2011 study: Zn-fortified bread improves serum Zn & ferritin

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2011 study: Zn-fortified bread improves serum Zn & ferritin

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Jun 23, 2017 5:17 pm

Effect of Consuming Zinc-Fortified Bread on Serum Zinc and Iron Status of Zinc-Deficient Women: A Double Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial (Badii et al, 2011)
http://search.proquest.com/openview/d40 ... bl=1566339

ABSTRACT
After iron deficiency, zinc deficiency is the major micronutrient deficiency in developing countries, and staple food fortification is an effective strategy to prevent and improve it among at-risk-populations. No action has been taken to reduce zinc deficiency via flour fortification so far in Iran, and little is known about the influence of zinc fortification of flour on serum zinc and the iron status, and also about the optimum and effective amount of zinc compound that is used in food fortification. The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of consuming zinc-fortified breads on the zinc and iron status in the blood serum.

In this study, three types of bread were prepared from non-fortified and fortified flours, with 50 and 100 ppm elemental zinc in the form of sulfate. Eighty zinc-deficient women aged 19 to 49 years were randomly assigned to three groups; The volunteers received, daily, (1) a nonfortified bread, (2) a high-zinc bread, and (3) a low-zinc bread for one month.

Serum zinc and iron were measured by Atomic Absorption before and after the study. Results showed a significant increase in serum zinc and iron levels in all groups (p < 0.001) except in the control (p > 0.05). Absorption of zinc and iron in the group that consumed high-zinc bread was significantly greater than that in the group that received low-zinc bread (p < 0.01).

It was concluded that fortification of flour with 50–100 ppm zinc was an effective way to achieve adequate zinc intake and absorption in zinc-deficient people. It also appeared that consuming zinc-fortified bread improved iron absorption.

Keywords: Bread fortification, serum iron, serum zinc, zinc deficiency, zinc sulfate.

related:

Effect of iron-fortified foods on hematologic and biological outcomes: systematic review of randomized controlled trial (Gera et al, 2012)
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/96/2/309.short

Results: Data from 60 trials showed that iron fortification of foods resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin (0.42 g/dL; 95% CI: 0.28, 0.56; P < 0.001) and serum ferritin (1.36 μg/L; 95% CI: 1.23, 1.52; P < 0.001), a reduced risk of anemia (RR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.71; P < 0.001) and iron deficiency (RR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.62; P < 0.001), improvement in other indicators of iron nutriture, and no effect on serum zinc concentrations, infections, physical growth, and mental and motor development.

that last nuance has been on my mind lately. think i'll take a look at the studies included, specifically individual studies' serum zinc measurements, and whether or not the intake of iron from fortified bread is equivalent to your typical iron supplement pill.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
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jimmylegs
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Re: 2011 study: Zn-fortified bread improves serum Zn & ferri

Postby ElliotB » Sun Jun 25, 2017 2:55 am

Wouldn't taking a Zn supplement and/or eating foods that contain zinc have the same effects?

Many foods contain zinc and since zinc is an essential trace mineral (which means our bodies only need a small amount of it (8 mg for adult women and 11 mg for adult men) to maintain good health). Although a relatively a small amount may be needed, the importance of zinc should not be underestimated. A healthy level of zinc has been linked to an improved immune system and faster wound healing.

Foods containing zinc include oysters which contain more zinc per serving than any other foo and red meat/poultry which provide the majority of zinc in the American diet. Other good food sources include beans, nuts, certain types of seafood (such as crab and lobster), whole grains, fortified breakfast cereals, and dairy products.
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Re: 2011 study: Zn-fortified bread improves serum Zn & ferri

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jun 25, 2017 4:51 am

in this study, the fortified bread is tested as both zinc supplement and as a zinc containing food. along the lines of the way white flour is fortified with iron and b vitamins in north America (although as has been pointed out elsewhere, levels of these essential nutrients are not restored via this practice to levels seen in whole wheat, making the use of the term 'fortified' questionable). also similar to the way iodine is added to table salt. vitamin d to milk.

while a zinc supplement alone can be expected to have negative impacts on at least copper and iron status, this study shows that these known consequences did not occur with the use of fortified bread.

I had been having some concerns about the status quo fortification of wheat flour with iron, and the potential consequences for zinc status over and above wheat's gluten content. the second abstract provided above gives some evidence that this is not the case. i'm relieved to hear it and will be looking for more research along similar lines.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10780
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm


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