Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe?

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Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe?

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:19 am

Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe? (2017)
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.10 ... 43027-0_21

Abstract
Reducing consumption of dietary saturated fat (SFA) has been part of dietary recommendations for many years as a means to prevent cardiovascular outcomes. Yet, recent research has challenged this very basic concept in preventive nutrition. Data have suggested that LDL-C raising effect of dietary SFA may be influenced by its dietary source, cheese having less hypercholesterolemic effects than butter. Observational cohort studies have generally failed to find significant associations between intake of SFA and risk of coronary heart disease. In large intervention studies, substituting vegetable oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids for SFA have not yielded consistent results in terms of cardiovascular benefits. In the end, there is no absolute consensus on the importance of SFA in a heart-healthy diet. As emphasized in this chapter, more research is required to put this debate at rest. In the mean time, focusing on whole foods and dietary patterns, without overly emphasizing the importance of SFA in the diet, seems entirely reasonable and appropriate.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
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jimmylegs
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Re: 2017 chapter: Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe?

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:22 am

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) Makes Food-Based Recommendations in the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2016)
http://www.aafp.org/afp/2016/0315/p525.html

Key Points for Practice
• Diets should include nutrient-dense foods in all food groups and in the proper amounts.
• Intake of added sugars and saturated fat should be limited, and sodium intake should be reduced.
• Nutrient-dense foods should replace those that are less healthy, taking into account cultural and personal preferences.

Saturated fats [max] 10% of calories per day

but what is the min?
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10772
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: 2017 chapter: Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe?

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:33 am

Nutritional assessment of macronutrients in primary school children and its association with anthropometric indices and oral health
fft: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/do ... 1&type=pdf

"1.6 percent of children have received saturated fat less than 75% recommended dietary allowance...

"only with saturated fat deficiency did we find a statistically significant difference for permanent teeth and a tendency toward statistical significance with deciduous teeth.

"This study highlights the important role of saturated fatty acids in prevention of dental carries."

so is the minimum 75% of 10%? not interested in promoting cavities...!
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10772
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe?

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:48 am

Saturated Fat
https://healthyforgood.heart.org/eat-sm ... rated-fats
The American Heart Association recommends aiming for a dietary pattern that achieves 5% to 6% of calories from saturated fat. For example, if you need about 2,000 calories a day, no more than 120 of them should come from saturated fat. That's about 13 grams of saturated fat per day.

or is the min 75% of 5-6%?
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10772
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Re: Saturated Fat: Friend or Foe?

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:51 am

Systematic Review of the Association between Dairy Product Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular-Related Clinical Outcomes (2016)
fft: http://advances.nutrition.org/content/7/6/1026.full

Abstract
The objective of this systematic review was to determine if dairy product consumption is detrimental, neutral, or beneficial to cardiovascular health and if the recommendation to consume reduced-fat as opposed to regular-fat dairy is evidence-based.

A systematic review of meta-analyses of prospective population studies associating dairy consumption with cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, hypertension, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and type 2 diabetes (T2D) was conducted on the basis of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Quality of evidence was rated by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scale.

High-quality evidence supports favorable associations between total dairy intake and hypertension risk and between low-fat dairy and yogurt intake and the risk of T2D.

Moderate-quality evidence suggests favorable associations between intakes of total dairy, low-fat dairy, cheese, and fermented dairy and the risk of stroke; intakes of low-fat dairy and milk and the risk of hypertension; total dairy and milk consumption and the risk of MetS; and total dairy and cheese and the risk of T2D.

High- to moderate-quality evidence supports neutral associations between
the consumption of total dairy, cheese, and yogurt and CVD risk;
the consumption of any form of dairy, except for fermented, and CAD risk;
the consumption of regular-and high-fat dairy, milk, and yogurt and stroke risk;
the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, cheese, yogurt, and fermented dairy and hypertension risk; and
the consumption of regular- and high-fat dairy, milk, and fermented dairy and T2D risk.

Data from this systematic review indicate that the consumption of various forms of dairy products shows either favorable or neutral associations with cardiovascular-related clinical outcomes.

The review also emphasizes that further research is urgently needed to compare the impact of low-fat with regular- and high-fat dairy on cardiovascular-related clinical outcomes in light of current recommendations to consume low-fat dairy.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 10772
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm


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