2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in PwMS

A board to discuss various diet-centered approaches to treating or controlling Multiple Sclerosis, e.g., the Swank Diet

2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in PwMS

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:10 pm

Nutritional Intake Correlates with Function in Persons with Mild-to-Moderate Multiple Sclerosis (2018)
http://www.ijmsc.org/doi/abs/10.7224/15 ... =cmsc-site

Abstract
Background: To assess the association between nutrition, ambulation, daily activity, quality of life (QOL) and fatigue in individuals with mild-to-moderate disability with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Methods: Cross-sectional pilot study that included twenty ambulatory volunteers with MS (14 F/6 M, 57.9±10.2 years, EDSS = 4.1±1.8). Primary outcome variables included dietary assessment (3-day dietary consumption and the Food Frequency Questionnaire), and 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). Secondary measures included the Timed 25-Foot Walk test (TW-25), Timed Up and Go test, daily activity and 3 self-report questionnaires; 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12), Short Form (SF)-36, and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS).

Results: Significant correlations were seen between the percent of diet comprised from fats and the 6MWT (r = 0.51, P = .02) and the physical functioning (PF) component of the SF-36 (r = 0.47, P = .03). The percent of carbohydrates was significantly correlated with the 6MWT (r = −0.43, P = .05), daily activity (r= −0.59, P = .005) and the PF component of the SF-36 (r = −0.47, P = .03). Cholesterol, folate, iron, and magnesium were significantly positively correlated with the PF component of the SF-36 and the 6MWT.

Conclusions: These findings indicate better ambulation and daily function as well as QOL with increased fat intake, decreased carbohydrate intake, and increased intake of the micronutrients cholesterol, folate, iron, and magnesium. This pilot study highlights the potential impact that diet may have on function and QOL in MS.
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Re: 2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in

Postby ElliotB » Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:36 am

The conclusion of the study:

These findings indicate better ambulation and daily function as well as QOL with increased fat intake, decreased carbohydrate intake, and increased intake of the micronutrients cholesterol, folate, iron, and magnesium


OMG, imagine that contrary to what most believe and have been told by so called experts, increased fat (I assume they are referring to good Omega 3 fats) and reduced carbs is a good thing! The Dr. Swank people and others who are advocates of low fat/no fat MS diets will not be happy!!! Although I would imagine they will just ignore this.

I happen to agree with this finding as that the general diet they recommend (too bad they don't give details) is basically the type of diet I follow and have been for 4 years and I am doing very well. But of course there are many (most) who follow a diet low in fat and high in carbs that are also doing well. The bottom lines is nobody is certain at this time as to what is the best diet to follow.
Last edited by ElliotB on Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:26 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: 2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:16 am

all such studies would do far better to measure dietary impacts on internal macro and micronutrient status as well as on function. would help explain contradictory study results, why a given diet worked for subject a and didn't for subject b, etc.

i had a next to no fat diet at dx. i had done things like take nutrient laden nuts out of my vegan diet, because of the fat content. idiotic.

for the far greater proportion of the population for whom a high fat diet is status quo leading up to dx, certainly one could expect benefits from a lower fat approach.

extremes in either direction are the danger.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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Re: 2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in

Postby ElliotB » Fri Jun 15, 2018 3:57 am

Perhaps the most important message from this study is that diet effects people with MS, something we probably already knew. Which diet is best is another story. Because ultimately if identical studies were done on all the different MS diets, the results for each diet would likely be the similar, because most people do well regardless of the diet they follow, especially if they are at the RRMS and likely SPMS stages.

But what is interesting is that this study included twenty ambulatory patients. But the results are not specific as to what the effect of diet was to this specific group.

Another oddity of this study is that a second variable, increased intake of the micronutrients cholesterol, folate, iron, and magnesium, was introduced. Usually when a study is done, there is only one variable that changes. Was it the diet or micronutrients that caused the improvement, or both?

There is ample evidence the a high good fat diet is likely a good diet to follow and additional studies will hopefully be done. Meat with good fats (high in EFAs/Omega 3s (whether from red meat, poultry or seafood) should likely be part of a healthy diet.
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Re: 2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in

Postby jimmylegs » Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:34 am

i don't believe there was anything 'introduced' or experimental about the micronutrients.

i haven't reviewed in fine detail, but my understanding is that they recruited via convenience sample, calculated nutrient intakes from subects' three day diet diaries, measured performance on various tests, and looked for any status quo patient nutrient intake correlations with performance, that achieved significance.

if i had time i'd be checking what the authors mean by higher and lower in absolute rather than relative terms. eg what if 'lower fat' means negligible/deficient daily fat intake, and 'higher fat' in this study context means 'adheres to healthy sat fat and total fat grams per day'...
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ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
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Re: 2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in

Postby Zyklon » Tue Jun 19, 2018 6:54 pm

Whatever diet makes us happy...

I believe specialized diets for MS are overrated. We are not different than non-MS people. Science, please prove me that I am wrong.
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Re: 2018 study: Nutritional Intake Correlates w Function in

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jun 20, 2018 6:49 am

i don't have the impression that study subjects were adhering to any specific diet. just that the researchers measured components of their status quo diet and noted which elements correlated to better health indicators.

pretty sure diets that make people happy (especially where happiness is measured in terms of convenient quieting of a growling belly with minimal time and effort) are a huge contributor to chronic health issues in developed nations

i agree that specialized 'ms' diets are overrated. there's a case to be made for specialized 'individual' diets.

not having spent much time on it to date, nutritgenomics has a distinct flavour of big brother - so far anyway. but genetics do tend to be a limiting factor where my capacity to help others with 'joe public' nutritional info is concerned.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 4415301400
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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