2018 paper: In Defense of Sugar: A Critique of Diet-Centrism

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2018 paper: In Defense of Sugar: A Critique of Diet-Centrism

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Sep 15, 2018 6:53 am

well, from what i recall physical activity does sit at the base of the food pyramid... but i guess that's no reason not to start a good argument lol

In Defense of Sugar: A Critique of Diet-Centrism (2018)
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 2018300847
Abstract
"Sugars are foundational to biological life and played essential roles in human evolution and dietary patterns for most of recorded history. The simple sugar glucose is so central to human health that it is one of the World Health Organization's Essential Medicines. Given these facts, it defies both logic and a large body of scientific evidence to claim that sugars and other nutrients that played fundamental roles in the substantial improvements in life- and health-spans over the past century are now suddenly responsible for increments in the prevalence of obesity and chronic non-communicable diseases. Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide a rigorous, evidence-based challenge to ‘diet-centrism’ and the disease-mongering of dietary sugar. The term ‘diet-centrism’ describes the naïve tendency of both researchers and the public to attribute a wide-range of negative health outcomes exclusively to dietary factors while neglecting the essential and well-established role of individual differences in nutrient-metabolism. The explicit conflation of dietary intake with both nutritional status and health inherent in ‘diet-centrism’ contravenes the fact that the human body is a complex biologic system in which the effects of dietary factors are dependent on the current state of that system. Thus, macronutrients cannot have health or metabolic effects independent of the physiologic context of the consuming individual (e.g., physical activity level). Therefore, given the unscientific hyperbole surrounding dietary sugars, I take an adversarial position and present highly-replicated evidence from multiple domains to show that ‘diet’ is a necessary but trivial factor in metabolic health, and that anti-sugar rhetoric is simply diet-centric disease-mongering engendered by physiologic illiteracy. My position is that dietary sugars are not responsible for obesity or metabolic diseases and that the consumption of simple sugars and sugar-polymers (e.g., starches) up to 75% of total daily caloric intake is innocuous in healthy individuals."

and so to a contradictory? complementary? point: i've seen other research suggesting a far greater proportion of people are actually sedentary, than would account for overall incidence of overweight and obesity. might moderation be the key? again???
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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Re: 2018 paper: In Defense of Sugar: A Critique of Diet-Cent

Postby NHE » Sat Sep 15, 2018 10:51 pm

Yes. Glucose is vital to the health of every cell. That's a red herring though. The problem is sucrose with its 50% mix of fructose and the lack of fiber in processed foods. High intakes of fructose without the fiber normally found in whole fruit is toxic to the liver and causes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease which is indistinguishable from liver cirrhosis due to alcohol.

Are these authors out for an ignoble? Who's paying them?
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Re: 2018 paper: In Defense of Sugar: A Critique of Diet-Cent

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Sep 16, 2018 3:23 am

who knows. think it's just one person, and i don't have time to dig in any further atm, but there are so many opportunities to call bs right in the abstract.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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jimmylegs
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Posts: 11759
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm


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