Summary of the pipeline

A board to discuss future MS therapies in early stage (Phase I or II) trials.

Postby Melody » Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:26 am

My husband goes to Dr. O'Connor at St' Mike's as well as Dr. Lee at Sunnybrook. Dr. O'Connor prescribed 2000iu to 4000iu of Vitamin D3 daily. Make sure it is vitamin D3 as that is a natural source. Depending on your sunlight exposure will determine what dose. My husband takes 2000iu per day. Keep in mind that Vitamin D3 is fat soluble so can be toxic. (Stored in the liver)You really need to monitor your dose closely.
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Progestin (Synthetic Progesterone)

Postby Shayk » Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:07 pm

Hi Dignan

I’d also like to thank you. LisaBee's post prompted me to review your list again. I can’t believe I missed :roll: suggesting progestin (a synthetic version of progesterone).

The Myelin Project has a brief description.

Dr. Christian Confavreux in Lyon and Dr. Etienne-Emile Baulieu in Paris are getting close to launching a placebo-controlled trial of progestin – a derivative of the sex hormone progesterone – involving 300 post-partum women with MS (for the rationale of this experiment please refer to our preceding reports). Enrollment will be open to patients in those European countries where there are centers that participate in the European Database for Multiple Sclerosis (EDMUS), a cooperative network of MS clinicians headed by Dr. Confavreux.


Additionally, the article Steroid hormones in multiple sclerosis notes that

The POPART’MUS study aim is then to compare MS clinical activity, in terms of relapses during the post-partum period, in women treated immediately after delivery and for 3 months with progestin and estradiol, by comparison to placebo-treated women.

If a beneficial effect of progestin drugs on relapses could be demonstrated, it would provide a new, rapidly active, safe and cheap preventive treatment for post-partum relapses.

Three hundred women will be enrolled in the POPART’MUS study, which will start during late spring 2005. Results are expected to be available in 2008.


I hope that's enough to get it on the Phase I or II list. Even though this trial isn't for everyone, I'm ever optimistic about progesterone's potential for everyone, men and women, young and old. :)


Sharon
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Postby dignan » Wed Aug 17, 2005 7:57 am

Done. Thanks for pointing that out. I put it under Phase II because if 300 people are in the trial, it can't be phase I, those are usually less than 50 people.
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Postby dignan » Wed Aug 17, 2005 10:45 am

I just moved the Popart'mus study to Phase III based on this:

Condition
Multiple Sclerosis

Intervention
Drug: nomegestrol acetate
Drug: Estradiol

Phase
Phase III

http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/N ... 5?order=21
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Postby Shayk » Wed Aug 17, 2005 7:49 pm

Terrific Dignan!

I like the Phase III and safe, fast, effective and cheap combo. :) I'm so glad you found they're recruiting and registered.

Thanks!

Sharon
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Postby Arron » Thu Aug 25, 2005 6:23 pm

bromley wrote:Arron,

Would you mind telling us something about yourself.


Glad you asked! Sorry I missed this question for so long. Even though this is quite off-topic, I'll answer it here given I missed it for so long.

Well let's see, I like fine dining, moonlit walks on the beach, and moderating forums in my spare time. :!: hahahahah

The story about ThisIsMs, its unbiased nature (and by that, I mean non-sponsored, and non-affiliated-- we most definitely ARE biased towards eliminating MS!), and the anonymity of it all are explained on our FAQ:

FAQ link

At some point, if people are interested, I will find time to delve further into the man, the myth, and the machine... perhaps by making this quite eligible bachelor available to the Lovely Ladies of This is MS?!? :twisted: (see above reference to moonlit walks on the beach) ... LOL

but not just yet :)
Disclaimer: Any information you find on this site should not be considered medical advice. All decisions should be made with the consent of your doctor, otherwise you are at your own risk.
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Postby dignan » Tue Aug 30, 2005 7:00 pm

Just wanted to mention that I've been trying to update this list when I find something new or different or find a mistake, so it's changed a bit since it was first posted.
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Postby dignan » Fri Sep 02, 2005 8:26 am

A new one I added to the list...


Highlights of chemical society meeting in Washington, D.C., Aug. 28 - Sept. 1
Iminosugars show promise against leukemia - Iminosugars are a special class of sugar molecules that are attracting widespread attention for their potential disease-fighting abilities. Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and Industrial Research Ltd. in New Zealand have designed synthetic iminosugars, called Immucillins, which are inhibitors of natural enzymes involved in promoting the growth of cancerous T-cells. When these enzymes (purine nucleosidases) are inhibited, cancerous T-cells can't divide, but normal, healthy cells are not affected. Immucillin-H shows promise in Phase II clinical trials for fighting leukemia, according to the researchers. Another iminosugar, DADMe-Immunicillin-H, has entered early clinical studies for treatment against T-cell autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disorder, multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. (CARB 42, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2:35 p.m., Washington Convention Center, Room 202A, during the symposium, "Iminosugars: Therapeutic Potential.")

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medical ... wsid=30014
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Postby dignan » Tue Sep 06, 2005 12:46 pm

There are now 100 substances on the pipeline list - a bit of a milestone.
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Postby bromley » Wed Sep 07, 2005 5:38 am

Dignan,

To get passed the 100 mark, the following should be included - ATL 1102 (Antisense Therapeutics). This was in Phase 11 trials but was halted because of the Tysabri fiasco (as was the trial for GSK 683 699 which is on the list).

It's good that so many drugs are in trials but it must be getting more difficult to recruit triallists - there are only a limited number of us and many will already be on treatment.


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Postby dignan » Wed Sep 07, 2005 8:27 am

Yeah, I didn't want to put a suspended drug on the list, so I'll actually take GSK off the list...but I've already added another, so it's still at 100.
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Postby dignan » Fri Sep 09, 2005 8:11 am

added vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the list as pre-clinical
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Postby dignan » Fri Sep 16, 2005 5:42 pm

Added a few new ones, unfortunately they're all pre-clinical so their chances of eventual approval are pretty lousy.
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Another drug in the MS pipeline

Postby joegeologist » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:41 am

Dignan,
I didn't see Fampridine SR (Acorda) on your list. Fampridine SR has completed phase II trials with encouraging results, and is now begining phase III trials.

Thanks for your efforts,
Joegeologist
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Postby dignan » Tue Sep 20, 2005 8:33 am

Yeah, that's an interesting one, but I decided that I would try to keep the list purely disease-modifying therapies and not drugs targeted at aleviating symptoms. Improving walking ability is a huge symptom, but from what Acorda says about Fampridine, it isn't going to be a disease-modifying therapy.


"In June 2005, Acorda initiated a Phase 3 clinical trial designed to evaluate the effects of Fampridine-SR on walking ability in people with MS. The study is a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that will enroll a total of 240 people at approximately 30 of the leading MS clinical centers in the United States and Canada."
http://www.acorda.com/pipeline_fampridine_ms1.asp
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