Minocycline Scores for Neuroprotection

A board to discuss future MS therapies in early stage (Phase I or II) trials.

Minocycline Scores for Neuroprotection

Postby Shayk » Wed Jan 24, 2007 7:43 pm

A positive study on minocycline and neuroprotection 8)

Multiple neuroprotective mechanisms of minocycline in autoimmune CNS inflammation
Available therapies mainly target the inflammatory component of the disease but fail to prevent neurodegeneration.

Functional and histopathological data of RGCs and optic nerves revealed neuronal and axonal protection when minocycline treatment was started on the day of immunization.

Furthermore, we demonstrate that minocycline-induced neuroprotection is related to a direct antagonism of multiple mechanisms leading to neuronal cell death such as the induction of anti-apoptotic intracellular signalling pathways and a decrease in glutamate excitotoxicity. From these observations, we conclude that minocycline exerts neuroprotective effects independent of its anti-inflammatory properties.

It doesn't look like they needed Copaxone to achieve these results. :wink:

Sharon
User avatar
Shayk
Family Elder
 
Posts: 779
Joined: Fri Feb 06, 2004 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Postby scoobyjude » Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:51 pm

Good news!! Do you think they will actually be able to push it through on it's own? I wonder.
User avatar
scoobyjude
Family Elder
 
Posts: 516
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 4:00 pm
Location: suburb of Chicago, IL USA

Postby marcstck » Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:39 pm

Very interesting. Might this indicate that those on one of the combination antibiotic protocols might be seeing a benefit that has nothing to do with the antibiotic properties of the drugs they are taking? I am convinced that these drugs are having a positive effect on their disease. I wish somebody would just fund a damn study on this, but I guess there's not enough money to be made...
User avatar
marcstck
Family Elder
 
Posts: 560
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2006 4:00 pm

Postby Shayk » Thu Jan 25, 2007 8:04 pm

Scooby
Do you think they will actually be able to push it through on it's own? I wonder

I wonder too. I think it's doubtful it would happen in the US but these researchers are in Germany, so who knows? It would be nice though.

marcstk
Might this indicate that those on one of the combination antibiotic protocols might be seeing a benefit that has nothing to do with the antibiotic properties of the drugs they are taking?

Personally I think it could mean that. There are of course many who would disagree with me. In a discussion about the Avonex tetracycline trial someone framed a similar question and dubbed it the million dollar question.

Sharon
User avatar
Shayk
Family Elder
 
Posts: 779
Joined: Fri Feb 06, 2004 4:00 pm

Postby dignan » Thu Jan 25, 2007 10:00 pm

I don't think it's crazy to consider the anti-inflammatory effects of antibiotics, and at least one company out there is looking into it. For some 2006 info on Paratek, the company working with Serono to develop an oral, non-antibacterial tetracyline derivitive to treat MS, see slides 16-21 of this presentation:

http://www.jefferies.com/pdfs/confs/060 ... alsInc.pdf
User avatar
dignan
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1608
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2004 3:00 pm

Postby SarahLonglands » Fri Jan 26, 2007 4:22 am

Marcstck said:
Very interesting. Might this indicate that those on one of the combination antibiotic protocols might be seeing a benefit that has nothing to do with the antibiotic properties of the drugs they are taking?

Of course people are experiencing both neuro-protective and anti-inflammatory benefits as well as the antibiotic benefits: when I swapped from doxycycline, which is very immunomodulatory to rifampicin, which isn't, I felt it for more than a few weeks! However, with someone like me, with very aggressive progressive disease, to have her disease stopped dead in its tracks, who then experiences a pretty marked improvement in her condition which continues long after stopping full-time antibiotics, it is more than neuroprotection. I do still improve bit by bit in ever lengthening periods when I am not taking anything and although I know that I am never going to be completely as I was before, I also know that I am not going to get worse due to MS.

Sarah
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
SarahLonglands
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2111
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Bedfordshire UK


Return to Drug Pipeline

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service