ATX MS 1467

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ATX MS 1467

Postby bromley » Wed Jan 30, 2008 4:44 am

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Re: ATX MS 1467

Postby NHE » Wed Jan 30, 2008 6:00 am

Thanks for the link Bromley. Do you know any details regarding this vaccine?
Keith Martin, Apitope chief executive, said the phase two trial of ATX-MS-1467 would start this year with about 80 patients in south-west England and last about two years. A diagnostic blood test for MS is also being developed.

Apitope’s approach is based on 20 years of research by David Wraith, professor of experimental pathology at Bristol University. The vaccine works by retuning the immune system so it no longer overreacts to patients’ own myelin protein.

Prof Wraith said this approach was more specific – and likely to carry fewer side-effects – than existing MS drugs that suppressed the immune system or reduced nerve inflammation.

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Re: ATX MS 1467

Postby NHE » Wed Jan 30, 2008 7:14 am

OK. This paper seems like it might be related.

Intranasal peptide-induced peripheral tolerance: the role of IL-10 in regulatory T cell function within the context of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2002 Sep 10;87(3-4):357-72.

Several of David Wraith's other papers appear to be focused on MBP suggesting that this new vaccine might be for MBP reactive cells. If true, this would leave out MOG and PLP reactive cells which Tovaxin also targets. Still, without knowing the specifics, it's difficult to know for certain.

More info on David C. Wraith can be found at...
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cellmolmed/staff/wraith.html
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cellmolmed/pos ... ofile.html
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cellmolmed/pos ... raith.html

Here's some slightly more detailed info on ATX-MS-1467...
The company, initially, is testing the safety and efficacy of ApitopesTM in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Its lead product is ATX-MS-1467, a peptide vaccine, which up regulates T cells through the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II receptor. The vaccine is potentially a disease-modifying therapy specifically designed from a naturally occurring antigenic protein to selectively inhibit the immune system's harmful attack on the nervous system. The normal immune response to infection is preserved. The ATX-MS-1467 vaccine is an equal parts mixture of four soluble, synthetic peptides (ApitopesTM). The company plans to develop ApitopesTM for other chronic diseases including Type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and the common allergies.

The unique Apitope peptides function as tolerogens, exerting their therapeutic effect via an highly selective immune re-balancing process that, in pre-clinical studies, has been linked to the induction of IL-10 secreting regulatory T cells.


From the abstract of Apitope's patent application...
A peptide which is capable of binding to an MHC class I or class II molecule without further processing and is selected from the following myelin basic protein peptides: 134-148, 135-149, 136-150, 137-151, 138-152 and 140-154. The peptide can be used in the manufacture of a medicament for the prevention or treatment of multiple sclerosis.


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Postby bromley » Wed Jan 30, 2008 7:53 am

NHE,

I don't know any more about this vaccine. But Prof Wraith works in Bristol, UK where Professor Scolding is based. A profile of Prof Wraith, who has recieved research funding from the UK MS Society is attached.

http://www.mssociety.org.uk/go.rm?id=13620

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