Inactivity can shorten telomeres and icrease biological age

Using exercise and physical therapy for recovery from the effects of MS, and for maintaining physical function.

Inactivity can shorten telomeres and icrease biological age

Postby NHE » Mon May 01, 2017 10:50 pm

Lack of activity may be aging you biologically
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national ... story.html

Spending too much of the day sitting has been linked to weight gain, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Might it also age you biologically?

The study analyzed data on 1,481 older women (age 79, on average) who wore movement trackers to record their activity. They also had DNA samples extracted to measure the length of telomeres, the caps at the end of DNA strands that protect chromosomes from wearing down, somewhat like the plastic tips at the end of shoelaces. Telomeres naturally become shorter with age. On average, the participants were sedentary for about nine hours a day. Women who were the most sedentary had the shortest telomeres, a length that the researchers said correlated to their being biologically older by eight years than their actual age. Abnormally shortened telomeres were not found among women who recorded at least 30 minutes a day of moderate to vigorous physical activity.
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Re: Inactivity can shorten telomeres and icrease biological

Postby NHE » Mon May 01, 2017 11:01 pm

Associations of Accelerometer-Measured and Self-Reported Sedentary Time with Leukocyte Telomere Length in Older Women
Am J Epidemiol. 2017;185(3):172–184

    Few studies have assessed the association of sedentary time with leukocyte telomere length (LTL). In a cross-sectional study conducted in 2012–2013, we examined associations of accelerometer-measured and self-reported sedentary time with LTL in a sample of 1,481 older white and African-American women from the Women's Health Initiative and determined whether associations varied by level of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA). The association between sedentary time and LTL was evaluated using multiple linear regression models. Women were aged 79.2 (standard deviation, 6.7) years, on average. Self-reported sedentary time was not associated with LTL. In a model adjusting for demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, and health-related factors, among women at or below the median level of accelerometer-measured MVPA, those in the highest quartile of accelerometer-measured sedentary time had significantly shorter LTL than those in the lowest quartile, with an average difference of 170 base pairs (95% confidence interval: 4, 340). Accelerometer-measured sedentary time was not associated with LTL in women above the median level of MVPA. Findings suggest that, on the basis of accelerometer measurements, higher sedentary time may be associated with shorter LTL among less physically active women.

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Re: Inactivity can shorten telomeres and icrease biological

Postby lyndacarol » Tue May 02, 2017 9:21 am

Another angle on telomeres to consider:

Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Has a Modest Positive Association with Leukocyte Telomere Length in Middle-Aged US Adults. (Feb 8, 2017)
Beilfuss J, Camargo CA Jr, Kamycheva E
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28179486

Conclusions: In a nationally representative population of adults, serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with LTL [leukocyte telomere length] in middle-aged participants (aged 40-59 y), independently of other factors. These findings suggest that decreased 25(OH)D concentrations are associated with genomic instability, although the clinical impact of this observation remains unclear.
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