International Interactome Initiative

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International Interactome Initiative

Postby dignan » Thu Jul 08, 2010 11:47 am

It's hard to imagine getting to the bottom of any complex, as yet not understood disease, like MS, without knowing all the proteins involved and how they interact.


Human genome: the hunt continues for 'malicious proteins'

July 8, 2010 -- Scientific advances of the past decade have shed new light on the interaction and roles of the body's 21,000 proteins

This undated handout illustration shows the DNA double helix. Scientific advances of the past decade, such as the sequencing of the human genome, have opened up compelling new fields of research on the interaction of the body's 21,000 proteins, and the role they play in cancer and other diseases.

Scientific advances of the past decade, such as the sequencing of the human genome, have opened up compelling new fields of research on the interaction of the body's 21,000 proteins, and the role they play in cancer and other diseases.

This is the focus of the "International Interactome Initiative" ("Triple I") or as some researchers call it, "I Cubed," led by Canadian Benoit Coulombe, director of the Gene Transcription and Proteomics Laboratory at the Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal -- the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal.

"Through genome sequencing, we obtained a list of all the proteins in the human body. We know their sequence through the DNA that encodes them, but for a large number of them, we had never seen them before and never studied them," he said.

We know even less about how they interact and what the biological outcomes are.

Proteins act not individually, but in "complexes" or groups, as they exert their influence on cells and on the human body, so researchers must map out their connections to understand their functions, Coulombe said.

To chart this, researchers select a protein, mark it or tag it, then yank it from its cell along with its "partners," after which it can be identified by mass spectrometry.

Studying certain proteins that we already knew to be involved in skin cancer, for example, allowed the discovery in the same grouping of a new protein responsible for a specific form of the disease -- research which is key to finding the right treatments one day.

While we may already know the culprit gene, it is impossible at the moment to modify the DNA in all cells. On the other hand, we can have an effect on the proteins with the right chemical molecule, the biologist explained.

A protein can become "malicious" because of a "bad" genetic code in its DNA, an evolution could be the result of something else, such as modification by an enzyme, in what is called an "epigenetic" event.

Charting the interactions of all of the body's 21,000 proteins is an immense task. Benoit Coulombe said laboratories currently use their own technologies to do so, but eventually will have to standardize their procedures to obtain comparable results.

The "I Cubed" program involves for now American, Austrian, Canadian, Swiss and German laboratories. Its steering committee has already started to standardize their procedures. Each group of researchers conducts the same experiments with 30 proteins and then they compare the results.

"For a complete map (of protein interactions), the human interactome, we will need 100 million dollars, five to 10 laboratories and five years of work," said Coulombe, whose team is primarily interested in cancer and neuromuscular diseases.

"We have to move step by step," but the genome sequencing "formidably accelerated" the scientific effort, he said.

"Genomic specialists are interested in genes, medical doctors in diseases, our research fills a void between these two," he added. They may also someday discover drugs for use against "bad proteins."

http://www.physorg.com/news197807005.html
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Postby dignan » Sat Jul 17, 2010 10:15 am

Not the same initiative, but related research. It's no wonder we haven't been able to figure out diseases like MS when we don't even know all of the different proteins that could potentially be involved.


Thousands of New Proteins Discovered in Spinal Fluid

July 16, 2010 -- PhysOrg.com -- Scientists and doctors have a far better understanding of the proteins in healthy spinal fluid, thanks to a U.S., Swedish team who identified 2,630 proteins in the clear fluid that protects the brain and spinal cord. This discovery nearly triples the number of proteins known to exist in spinal fluid. Another striking finding was that slightly more than half of the proteins were not found in blood.

The team was led by Richard D. Smith, Ph.D., of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Steven E. Schutzer, MD, of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey -- New Jersey Medical School.

In conducting this research, the team used integrated resources at EMSL that included a custom-built automated nanocapillary liquid chromatography system coupled on-line to one of two mass spectrometers, modified in-house with an electrodynamic ion funnel.

This research establishes a reference database that may help researchers and clinicians determine the root causes of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other neurological conditions. In addition, this work could improve the chances of devising faster, more efficient diagnostic tests and treatments for diseases with neurological and psychiatric features.

While this work is the most comprehensive characterization of normal spinal fluid to date, it is only the beginning. Quickly and precisely determining the proteins in different samples opens doors to fundamentally understanding human health.

"These exciting findings are the tip of our research iceberg," said Smith, a Wiley Research Fellow at the Department of Energy's EMSL.

http://www.physorg.com/news198482236.html
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