IGFBP-1 deficiency and MS

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IGFBP-1 deficiency and MS

Postby joeymia » Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:49 pm

Does anyone have a deficiency in IGFBP-1? I am 30 years old and recently was tested as deficient with 9ng/mL. The reference range is 13-73. I should not be that low considering how young I am.

Has anyone had experience treating this?

Pro/Cons on getting on HGH with MS?

My doctor is recommending Gentropin Miniquick 0.8mg subcutaneous injections every day for 3 months. Hopefully I can get insurance approval because this stuff isn't cheap. Around $400 a week!

Reason I got tested was because I have a lot of fatigue.
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Postby joeymia » Mon Aug 09, 2010 11:42 am

no one has taken HGH? or tested low on IGF?
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Postby jimmylegs » Mon Aug 09, 2010 12:50 pm

try a zinc level test perhaps..? zinc is CHEAP.

Changes in Rat Hepatic Gene Expression in Response to Zinc Deficiency as Assessed by DNA Arrays (2003)
http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/133/4/1004
...the protein product of IGFBP1 also was lower than controls in zinc-deficient rats
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Postby jimmylegs » Mon Aug 09, 2010 1:03 pm

here's a cool graph from the study data

top left corner shows the IGFBP1, weaker results under "-", the zinc deficient diet compared to "+" the not deficient diet.

http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content-nw/ ... /4/1004/F2

Image


Larger version at http://jn.nutrition.org/content/vol133/ ... 39002.jpeg


.
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Aug 10, 2010 4:45 am

thanks for editing that img NHE :)

hey joey, here are some other abstracts that i put in your regimens post:

Role of insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormone in growth inhibition induced by magnesium and zinc deficiencies (2007)
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/di ... aid=871212
We have evaluated the effect of Mg and Zn deficiency on growth, serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (s-IGF-1), growth hormone (s-GH) and insulin (s-insulin) in young rats... In conclusion, both Mg and Zn deficiency lead to growth inhibition that is accompanied by reduced circulating s-IGF-1, but unchanged s-GH response... The reduction in s-IGF-1 could not be attributed to reduced energy intake, but seems to be a specific effect of nutritional deficiency of Mg or Zn.

Dietary supplementation with zinc oxide increases IGF-I and IGF-I receptor gene expression in the small intestine of weanling piglets
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=17901232
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Postby FastBenz » Tue Sep 07, 2010 11:38 am

I started this week. I'll let you know how it goes.
1iu HGH for 5 days and 2cc testosterone 1cc 2x a week.
Both were low for me. I am 40 though.
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Sep 07, 2010 4:36 pm

quick FYI, zinc boosts testosterone. and magnesium helps with fatigue. that's just a tiny taste of the hundreds of things these minerals are involved with in a healthy body.
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Postby FastBenz » Mon Sep 13, 2010 11:30 am

1 week down. I do have more energy from the hgh. I did start 2iu today as I was recommend by the Dr. Didn't take Nuvigil today and not tired at all. This could be good.
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Postby shye » Mon Sep 13, 2010 2:06 pm

fastBenz
curious if you even read the solid info Jimmylegs posted on the Zinc (and magnesium) related to your low counts--
Why take a potent medicine/hormone when you could most probably produce it yourself if you get your zinc and mg levels up?

We are a culture that reveres the quick fix.
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Postby lyndacarol » Mon Sep 13, 2010 5:44 pm

FastBenz-- please discuss with your doctor all these substances: human growth hormone, IGF-1, and IGFBP-1.

I found the following disturbing:

Growth factor was mentioned in the Winter 08-09 issue of the MS Society publication named Momentum:

The growth factor IGF-1 had shown some success in promoting myelin formation, so a Society-funded team led by Stephane Genoud, PhD (The Salk Institute, La Jolla, Calif.), injected it into mice with EAE. The injections actually worsened the disease. (Journal of Neuroimmunology 2005; 168:40-5) Such failures are important to pinpoint before they affect people with MS in clinical trials.

Here is the abstract of the work mentioned:

1: J Neuroimmunol. 2005 Nov;168(1-2):40-5. Epub 2005 Aug 24. Links
Targeted expression of IGF-1 in the central nervous system fails to protect mice from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.Genoud S, Maricic I, Kumar V, Gage FH.
Laboratory of Genetics, The Salk Institute, 10010 N Torrey Pines Rd, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been identified as a critical molecule in the induction of myelination in the central nervous system (CNS). Systemic injection of IGF-1 has been shown to have a varied and transiently protective effect on the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Since systemic IGF-1 can also modulate peripheral immune lymphocytes, we examined whether a sustained and local delivery of IGF-1 into the spinal cord would have any influence on the chronic course of EAE in C57/BL6 mice. The capability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to be retrogradely transported efficiently from muscle to motor neurons of the spinal cord was used to overcome the difficulty routinely encountered when attempting chronic delivery of molecules into the CNS. We demonstrate that AAV-mediated delivery of IGF-1 in CNS did not have any beneficial effect on the clinical course of EAE. Injection of AAV-IGF1 after induction of the disease worsened the clinical symptoms. Furthermore, CNS expression of IGF-1 did not affect the pathogenic anti-MOG T cell response, as examined by proliferation and cytokine secretion. Thus, enhanced expression of IGF-1 in the CNS during inflammation does not have a significant effect on myelination. These data have important implications for the potential use of IGF-1 in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

PMID: 16120466 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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Re: IGF-1

Postby NHE » Mon Sep 13, 2010 10:28 pm

Hi Lyndacarol,
Thanks for posting that interesting abstract. That study used a virus to carry IGF-1 into the CNS. I don't know what type of treatment FastBenz is receiving, but it's likely systemic not CNS directed.

NHE
Last edited by NHE on Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Sep 14, 2010 5:16 am

speaking of myelin...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15921663
Brain Res. 2005 Jun 28;1048(1-2):228-34.

Morphological alterations produced by zinc deficiency in rat sciatic nerve: a histological, electron microscopic, and stereological study.
Unal B, Tan H, Orbak Z, Kiki I, Bilici M, Bilici N, Aslan H, Kaplan S.

Abstract
Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element for humans and animals. It is required for normal growth, gene expression, wound healing, protein metabolism, immune function, and membrane integrity. In this study, unbiased stereological methods have been used to quantify the effects of Zn deficiency on the sectioned surface area and the number of myelinated axons in the sciatic nerve of rats. Animals were fed a Zn-deficient or Zn-sufficient diet for a period of 4 weeks. At the end of this time, the samples of sciatic nerves were removed from the animals, processed for electron microscopy and embedded in resin. The Zn-deficient group of rats was found to have a lower body weight compared to rats in the control group (P < 0.05). The sectioned surface area of nerve cross-section and myelinated axon number in Zn-deficient rats decreased by 20% and 29%, respectively, compared to the control group. A significant correlation between sectioned surface area and myelinated axon number was also determined. Morphological findings were as follows: on light microscopy, it was determined that certain abnormalities occur specifically in the experimental group, such as collapsed nerve fascicles, irregular profiles of and degeneration in myelin sheaths, and on electron microscopy, extensive myelin damage was seen in Zn-deficient groups compared with control groups. This study suggests that peripheral nerves require Zn for development and preservation of their structure.
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Postby FastBenz » Tue Sep 14, 2010 1:36 pm

I will talk with my neuro. But I feel I have MUCH more energy and I'm less depressed and moody. I have the stress of divorce,losing my house, and mom having colon cancer going on. Sticking with it for now.
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Postby shye » Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:11 pm

wow FastBenz, you are definitely under a lot of stress--
lots of light to you..and your mother.
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:40 pm

ouch! glad you are feeling somewhat better at least, FB.

wonder what happened to joey?
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