Brain MRI heterogeneity of the cervical cord

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Brain MRI heterogeneity of the cervical cord

Postby Lydia_S » Thu Jan 13, 2011 2:32 am

"In conclusion, and compared with an earlier control you get the impression of small deterioration, due to the presence of diffuse heterogeneity of the cervical cord along it's election without apparent outbreak of pathological lession"....

Has anyone heard it before?

The doctor that made the MRI, not the neurologist, told us that it seem's like the body has send it's army to fight for something. It was the first time we saw this. I can't find anything by googling it...Our friends from the greek forum had interesting ideas:

That it might be partial atrophy of the nervous tissue, this kind of MRI image can't be explained from autoimmune theory...Another suggestion is that this image fits with the Schelling theory:

The spinal cord is forced to sudden palidromes movements due to the violent displacement of cerebrospinal fluid. Because it is supported by denticulate ligaments, there is pressure at that point. In order to deal with the pressure it increases the production of astrocytes that "choke" the axons. This difference in the density of the structural tissue (astrocytes) may be the subject of observation.

Interesting don't you think?
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Postby sou » Thu Jan 13, 2011 5:14 pm

This is a small world, isn't it? :D

What is really important in MS is the clinical condition. MRIs are images that we can't really evaluate, in terms of damage type. Can you specify how the cord appears on the MRI? Is it hyper- or hypo- intense?

Like I said, hypointensity means that there is some tissue missing. Hyperintensity is a hallmark of inflammation, but not always. It can be scarring (astrocytes), demyelination, either or both. What is your radiologist's opinion about this matter?

Such findings are common in MS.

http://yassermetwally.wordpress.com/2010/04/30/myelopathy-in-multiple-sclerosis/

MS spinal cord abnormalities can be divided into three main types: (1) focal, well demarcated areas of high signal intensity on T2-WI; (2) diffuse abnormalities seen as poorly demarcated areas of increased signal intensity on T2-WI; and (3) spinal cord atrophy and axonal loss.
Shortest joke: "We may not be able to cure MS but we can manage its symptoms."
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Postby Lydia_S » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:03 am

Thanks for answering, both times :D. I'll check out the link you send me. He will see the neurologist tomorrow. I'll write if there is an interesting answer besides "That indicates that you should change the wonderful REBIF and take the most wonderful TYSABRI"...
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