Lyme Disease and MS

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Re: Tysabri (Lyme disease and MS)

Postby AlmostClever » Wed Aug 31, 2011 3:52 am

NHE wrote:
bartman wrote:Having just been on Tysarbri, you have basically wiped out your immune system.


This is not correct. Tysabri does not "wipe out" the immune system. It is an antibody which blocks cell adhesion molecules, such as VCAM-1, necessary for T-lymphocytes to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB). The immune system remains active. Indeed, patients coming off of Tysabri often experience Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) where the active immune system is now free to cross the BBB and cause enhanced inflammation.

For more details, the following information is quoted from Tysabri's prescribing information. http://www.tysabri.com/en_US/tysb/site/ ... BRI-pi.pdf

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
12.1 Mechanism of Action
Natalizumab binds to the alpha 4-subunit of alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 7 integrins expressed on the surface of all leukocytes except neutrophils, and inhibits the alpha 4-mediated adhesion of leukocytes to their counter-receptor(s). The receptors for the alpha 4 family of integrins include vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), which is expressed on activated vascular endothelium, and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) present on vascular endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Disruption of these molecular interactions prevents transmigration of leukocytes across the endothelium into inflamed parenchymal tissue. In vitro, anti-alpha 4-integrin antibodies also block alpha 4- mediated cell binding to ligands such as osteopontin and an alternatively spliced domain of fibronectin, connecting segment-1 (CS-1). In vivo, natalizumab may further act to inhibit the interaction of alpha 4-expressing leukocytes with their ligand(s) in the extracellular matrix and on parenchymal cells, thereby inhibiting further recruitment and inflammatory activity of activated immune cells.

The specific mechanism(s) by which TYSABRI exerts its effects in multiple sclerosis and Crohn’s disease have not been fully defined.

In multiple sclerosis, lesions are believed to occur when activated inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes, cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Leukocyte migration across the BBB involves interaction between adhesion molecules on inflammatory cells and their counter-receptors present on endothelial cells of the vessel wall. The clinical effect of natalizumab in multiple sclerosis may be secondary to blockade of the molecular interaction of alpha 4 beta 1-integrin expressed by inflammatory cells with VCAM-1 on vascular endothelial cells, and with CS-1 and/or osteopontin expressed by parenchymal cells in the brain. Data from an experimental autoimmune encephalitis animal model of multiple sclerosis demonstrate reduction of leukocyte migration into brain parenchyma and reduction of plaque formation detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following repeated administration of natalizumab. The clinical significance of these animal data is unknown.


NHE


The Western-Blot for Lyme actually looks for proteins (specific or associated with Lyme bacteria). Antibodies are used in the lab to detect or react with these proteins.

I believe Tysabri would not affect these proteins in your body, so a Lyme W-B would still be unaffected after taking Tysabri.

I do not know how Tysabri affects antibodies in your body that would normally target Lyme. Obviously, it affects those antibodies that control the JC Virus which is why we see the elevated PML risk in Tysabri patients.

The advanced biology knowledge required escapes me. :?:
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Al Einstein
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Re: Tysabri (Lyme disease and MS)

Postby AlmostClever » Wed Aug 31, 2011 4:03 am

AlmostClever wrote:Obviously, it affects those antibodies that control the JC Virus which is why we see the elevated PML risk in Tysabri patients.



Maybe I should have said "leukocyte" or "white blood cell" instead of "antibodies"... I think you get the picture.
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Postby bartman » Wed Aug 31, 2011 3:17 pm

I'm not a doctor or a scientist but Tysarbri suppresses the immune system. I'm not sure of the mechanism but I have been told by a few neurologists. Regardless, it does not help attain an accurate reading on a test designed to fail!
Sometimes people with Lyme treated with long term antibiotics develop candida. It is not the norm but it happens. That is why it is important to take probiotics and adjust diet.

My point is your willing to give Tysarbri a try but not minocycline? Minocycline is a miracle drug! I can't see why your neuro would object, safe, cheap, easy to take, time tested, used to treat acne for years. This is what you tell the neuro or any doctor. Just be prepared for the herxheimer.
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Postby AlmostClever » Wed Aug 31, 2011 3:28 pm

Yes. The W-B has a low accuracy rate. Most figures I have seen range between 40-60% accuracy! Far from 100%!
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Re: Tysabri (Lyme disease and MS)

Postby AlmostClever » Thu Sep 01, 2011 8:40 am

AlmostClever wrote:The Western-Blot for Lyme actually looks for proteins (specific or associated with Lyme bacteria). Antibodies are used in the lab to detect or react with these proteins.

I believe Tysabri would not affect these proteins in your body, so a Lyme W-B would still be unaffected after taking Tysabri.

I do not know how Tysabri affects antibodies in your body that would normally target Lyme. Obviously, it affects those antibodies that control the JC Virus which is why we see the elevated PML risk in Tysabri patients.

The advanced biology knowledge required escapes me. :?:


Sorry, after more research I am unsure if what I stated is true.

I will report back when I find specific info.
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Postby AlmostClever » Thu Sep 01, 2011 8:50 am

"Antibody tests usually involve mixing the patient’s sample with a known antigen, the substance that the antibody is directed against or produced in response to, and seeing if a reaction takes place. If an antibody is present and binds to the known antigen, the formation of the antibody-antigen complex can be measured."

source:
http://labtestsonline.org/understanding ... ce?start=2
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Re: Lyme Disease and MS

Postby fee001 » Thu Sep 08, 2011 12:14 am

Hi!



http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Lyme-disea ... ptoms.aspx


Symptoms of Lyme disease

Chronic Lyme disease
Chronic Lyme disease is a syndrome (a collection of symptoms) that is experienced by some people who have had Lyme disease.

The symptoms of chronic Lyme disease are similar to those of fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome, and it is thought that it might be triggered by late-stage Lyme disease. More research into this form of Lyme disease is needed.
The symptoms of Lyme disease usually fall into three distinct stages - early, mid and late. You should only experience symptoms of mid and late stage Lyme disease if you are not treated with antibiotics during the initial stage of the condition.

Early stage Lyme disease
The symptoms of early stage Lyme disease develop three to 30 days after someone is bitten by an infected tick. The most common symptom of early stage Lyme disease is a distinctive circular skin rash, known as erythema migrans.

The rash develops at the site of the tick bite and is often described as looking like a bull’s-eye on a dart board. The affected area of skin will be red and feel slightly raised to the touch.

The size of the rash can range from between 2-30cm (0.7-12 inches) and in most people it expands over a period of several days or weeks. In up to a third of people with Lyme disease, the rash may be the only symptom experienced.

Other symptoms of early stage Lyme disease are flu-like and can include:

•tiredness (fatigue)
•muscle pain
•joint pain
•headache
•fever or chills
•neck stiffness
Mid stage Lyme disease
The symptoms of mid stage Lyme disease usually develop many weeks, or sometimes several months, after being bitten by an infected tick. However, they usually only affect people who were not treated with antibiotics at an early stage.

In untreated cases of Lyme disease, people will develop flu-like symptoms, such as aching muscles and tiredness. Some people may also experience two or three episodes of inflammatory arthritis (swelling and pain in the joints) which lasts for about a week. However, symptoms such as joint pain should eventually resolve even if they are left untreated.

In around 15% of untreated cases of Lyme disease, people will get neurological symptoms (those that affect the nervous system). These symptoms include:

•numbness and pain in your limbs
•temporary paralysis of your facial muscles - usually only one half of the face is affected; this symptom is sometimes known as Bell’s palsy)
•impaired memory
•difficulty concentrating
•changes in personality
Some people may also develop meningitis, which is a serious condition where the meninges (the protective membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord) become inflamed. The symptoms of meningitis include:

•severe headache
•stiff neck
•increased sensitivity to light (photophobia)
Seek immediate medical advice if you experience any of these symptoms.

Late stage Lyme disease
In a minority of untreated cases, the symptoms of late stage Lyme disease can develop after many months, or even years. As with mid stage Lyme disease, the symptoms can affect both the joints and the nervous system. The symptoms can include:

•long-lasting (chronic) joint pain and swelling
•pins and needles
•tiredness
•impaired memory
•difficulty concentrating
•depression
•blue or red rash, leading to thinning of the skin (atrophy) which is more common in older women
I do my own research, and find my own answers Its good to talk
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Re: Lyme Disease and MS

Postby fee001 » Mon Sep 19, 2011 8:28 am

Pet owners are warned by PDSA vets of a 150% rise in Lyme disease


http://www.vetsonline.com/actualites/de ... -pdsa.html
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