Wellbutrin and Melatonin

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Wellbutrin and Melatonin

Postby Wendigo » Sun Nov 13, 2011 11:22 am

I stopped smoking about 2 months ago and was given Wellbutrin for depression last week 100 mg twice a day. It has worked for depression but is "speedy" and makes me feel weak and difficult to sleep at night. I take one at 7 am and one at 1 pm. I feel better before taking the morning pill strength wise. I'm wondering if anyone else has had that side effect - maybe it goes away with time?

For sleep I have temazepam (Restoril), a benzodiazepine, and even with 30 mg temazepam I cannot sleep more than 4 hours. The Wellbutrin keeps me from being able to take a nap in the day, something I used to need and treasure. I try just resting for 30-60 minutes during the day but sleep won't happen even though I am tired.

Someone suggested melatonin 3 mg for sleep. I was reading on this site that almost half of those with MS have a deficient pineal gland, where melatonin comes from. Does anyone here with MS use melatonin for sleep or is there anything unsafe about it?

Thanks in advance.
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Re: Wellbutrin and Melatonin

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Nov 13, 2011 12:22 pm

FYI

ms patients tend to have sub-optimal magnesium status. magnesium is known to help relax and sleep. it also has links to pineal health and melatonin production.

Dietary magnesium deficiency decreases plasma melatonin in rats
http://www.jle.com/en/revues/agro_biote ... article.md
It has been postulated that Mg depletion is associated with decreased melatonin. Exogenous magnesium (Mg) has been found to increase the activity of serotonin N-acetyltransferase, an enzyme in the pathway for melatonin synthesis\; but no data have been found on the effect of Mg deficiency on plasma melatonin. This pilot study examined the effect of a dietary Mg deficiency on plasma melatonin in male, Sprague-Dawley rats. Weanling rats were placed on a Mg-deficient (150 ppm) or a Mg-adequate (1000 ppm) diets for four weeks, after which they were sacrificed 4, 5 or 7 hours into the dark cycle. Plasma was assayed for melatonin concentrations. A significant decrease (p \= 0.0101) occurred in mean (± SEM) plasma melatonin levels of the Mg-deficient animals (50 ± 6.4 pg/mL) when compared to the Mg-adequate animals (75 ± 6.6 pg/mL). There was no obvious phase shift in the melatonin profile of the Mg-deficient animals when compared to the Mg-adequate animals.

Nocturnal Melatonin Secretion in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Affective Disorders

a human study including ms patients

The pineal gland has been implicated recently in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic demyelinating disease of CNS. Since nocturnal melatonin secretion is low in some groups of patients with mental depression, we predicted lower melatonin secretion in MS patients with history of affective illness compared to those without psychiatric disorders. To test this hypothesis, we studied single nocturnal plasma melatonin levels and the incidence of pineal calcification (PC) on CT scan in a cohort of 25 MS patients (4 men, 21 women; mean age = 39.4 years, SD = 9.3), 15 of whom had a history of coexisting psychiatric disorders with predominant affective symptomatology. Other factors that may be related to depression such as vitamin B12, folic acid, zinc, magnesium, and homocysteine, were also included in the analysis. Neither any of the metabolic factors surveyed nor the incidence of PC distinguished the psychiatric from the control group. However, the mean melatonin level in the psychiatric patients was significantly lower than in the control group. Since low melatonin secretion in patients with depression may be related to a phase-advance of the circadian oscillator regulating the offset of melatonin secretion, we propose that the depression of MS likewise may reflect the presence of dampened circadian oscillators. Furthermore, since exacerbation of motor symptoms in MS patients may be temporally related to worsening of depression, we propose that circadian phase lability may also underlie the relapsing-remitting course of the disease. Consequently, pharmacological agents such as lithium or bright light therapy, which have been shown to phase-delay circadian rhythms, might be effective in the treatment of affective symptoms in MS as well as preventing motor exacerbation and hastening a remission from an acute attack.

'normal' serum range for magnesium is 0.70-1.10 mmol/L but to be optimal serum magnesium must be minimum 0.90 mmol/L. i strongly suspect that most or all ms patients (including the 'controls') in the above study had levels below 0.90, and that in some it manifested as poor pineal function, whereas others would have had pain or spasticity or something else from one of the other 300+ pathways in which magnesium is involved.
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Re: Wellbutrin and Melatonin

Postby jackD » Sun Nov 13, 2011 12:49 pm

After reading this abstract I decided not take melatonin supplements nor to do anything to increase my melatonin levels.

jackD

Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2001 Mar;10(3):467-76.

The immunotherapeutic potential of melatonin.

Maestroni GJ.
SourceCenter for Experimental Pathology, Istituto Cantonale di Patologia, PO Box, 6601 Locarno, Switzerland. icpcps@guest.cscs.ch

Abstract
The interaction between the brain and the immune system is essential for the adaptive response of an organism against environmental challenges. In this context, the pineal neurohormone melatonin (MEL) plays an important role. T-helper cells express G-protein coupled cell membrane MEL receptors and, perhaps, MEL nuclear receptors. Activation of MEL receptors enhances the release of T-helper cell Type 1 (Th1) cytokines, such as gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN) and IL-2, as well as of novel opioid cytokines.

[b]MEL has been reported also to enhance the production of IL-1, IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocytes
. [/b][/color]These mediators may counteract stress-induced immunodepression and other secondary immunodeficiencies and protect mice against lethal viral encephalitis, bacterial diseases and septic shock. Therefore, MEL has interesting immunotherapeutic potential in both viral and bacterial infections. MEL may also influence haemopoiesis either by stimulating haemopoietic cytokines, including opioids, or by directly affecting specific progenitor cells such as pre-B cells, monocytes and NK cells. MEL may thus be used to stimulate the immune response during viral and bacterial infections as well as to strengthen the immune reactivity as a prophylactic procedure. In both mice and cancer patients, the haemopoietic effect of MEL may diminish the toxicity associated with common chemotherapeutic protocols. Through its pro-inflammatory action, MEL may play an adverse role in autoimmune diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis patients have increased nocturnal plasma levels of MEL and their synovial macrophages respond to MEL with an increased production of IL-12 and nitric oxide (NO). In these patients, inhibition of MEL synthesis or use of MEL antagonists might have a therapeutic effect.

In other diseases such as multiple sclerosis the role of MEL is controversial. However, the correct therapeutic use of MEL or MEL antagonists should be based on a complete understanding of their mechanism of action. It is not yet clear whether MEL acts only on Th1 cells or also on T-helper Type 2 cells (Th2). This is an important point as the Th1/Th2 balance is of crucial importance in the immune system homeostasis. Furthermore, MEL being the endocrine messenger of darkness, its endogenous synthesis depends on the photoperiod and shows seasonal variations. Similarly, the pharmacological effects of MEL might also be season-dependent. No information is available concerning this point. Therefore, studies are needed to investigate whether the immunotherapeutic effect of MEL changes with the alternating seasons.

PMID:11227046[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE
.
http://home.ix.netcom.com/~jdalton/ms-two-stages.pdf
.
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Re: Wellbutrin and Melatonin

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Nov 13, 2011 2:21 pm

don't dismiss this point though jack:
the correct therapeutic use of MEL or MEL antagonists should be based on a complete understanding of their mechanism of action. It is not yet clear whether MEL acts only on Th1 cells or also on T-helper Type 2 cells (Th2). This is an important point as the Th1/Th2 balance is of crucial importance in the immune system homeostasis.
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Re: Wellbutrin and Melatonin

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Nov 13, 2011 7:20 pm

check out this post wendigo. see any other red flags?

general-discussion-f1/topic18397-15.html#p180615
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