Vitamin D Levels Correspond to Disability in MS

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Vitamin D Levels Correspond to Disability in MS

Postby tedhutchinson » Tue May 15, 2012 1:30 am

Vitamin D Levels Correspond to Disability in MS
They found that for every 10-ng/mL (25nmol/l) increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, subsequent EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale) scores were 0.05 points lower, and subsequent normalized gray matter volume was 7 cc higher
.....................
Based on the results and a growing body of literature suggesting a role for vitamin D in MS, lead investigator Dr. Ellen Mowry, an assistant professor of neuroimmunology at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, often supplements her patients to a vitamin D level of 40-60 ng/mL =100-150nmol/l, which usually takes 2,000-4,000 international units a day.


People who live north of Baltimore may require more. In the UK it is likely to take more than 5000iu/daily.
CityAssays Birmingham NHS Path lab will send a postal 25(OH)D test for £25 UK or £30 for International. IMO as MS is an inflammatory condition and the highest anti-inflammatory action of vit d is found at 125nmol/l or 50ng/ml Up to 10,000iu daily is safe (it's the amount your skin would create if you were able to live naked outdoors)
BigVits or Amazon UK now offer 5000 iu drops/capsules around £12 for a years supply, Almost as cheap as Iherb/Vitacost or other US discount supplier.
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Re: Vitamin D Levels Correspond to Disability in MS

Postby tedhutchinson » Tue May 15, 2012 4:46 am

Vitamin D status predicts new brain MRI activity in multiple sclerosis
Abstract
Objective:
We sought to determine if vitamin D status is associated with developing new T2 lesions or contrast-enhancing lesions on brain MRI in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS).

Methods:
EPIC is a five-year longitudinal MS cohort study at the University of California, San Francisco. Participants had clinical evaluations, brain MRI, and blood draws annually. From the overall cohort, we evaluated patients with clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing-remitting MS at baseline. In univariate and multivariate (adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, smoking, and MS treatments) repeated measures analyses, annual 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were evaluated for their association with subsequent new T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhancing T1-weighted lesions on brain MRI, clinical relapses, and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS]).

Results:
2,362 3T brain MRI scans were acquired from 469 subjects. In multivariate analyses, each 10 ng/mL higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with a 15% lower risk of a new T2 lesion (incidence rate ratio [IRR]= 0.85, 95% CI [0.76, 0.95], p=0.004) and a 32% lower risk of a gadolinium-enhancing lesion (IRR=0.68, 95% CI [0.53, 0.87], p=0.002). Each 10 ng/mL higher vitamin D level was associated with lower subsequent disability (-0.047, 95% CI [-0.091, -0.003], p=0.037). Higher vitamin D levels were associated with lower, but not statistically significant, relapse risk. Except for the EDSS model, all associations were stronger when the within-person change in vitamin D level was the predictor.

Interpretation:
Vitamin D levels are inversely associated with MS activity on brain MRI. These results provide further support for a randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation. ANN NEUROL 2010
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Re: Sun Exposure, Vitamin D Intake and Progression to Disabi

Postby tedhutchinson » Wed May 16, 2012 2:19 am

Sun Exposure, Vitamin D Intake and Progression to Disability among Veterans with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Link downloads full text PDF to your PC.
Abstract
Background:

Early life events have been suggested to influence multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility, and to potentially modulate its clinical course. We assessed vitamin D-related exposures from childhood to disease onset and their associations with MS progression.
Methods:
Among veterans in the Multiple Sclerosis Surveillance Registry, 219 reported
having the progressive form and met the inclusion criteria.
Participants reported their past sun exposure, vitamin D-related intake and age at disability milestones using the Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to examine the association between vitamin D-related exposures and time (years) to disability.
Results:
Low average sun exposure in the fall/winter before disease onset was associated with an increased risk of progressing to a PDDS score of 8 (hazard ratio, HR: 2.13,95% confidence interval, CI: 1.20–3.78), whereas use of codliver oil during childhood and adolescence was associated with a reduced risk (HR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.20–0.96).
Conclusions:
These results suggest that exposure to vitamin D before MS onset might slow disease-related neurodegeneration and thus delay progression to disability among patients with the progressive subtype.

It's worth having a look at the graphs from the paper showing the difference between those with highest/lowest vitamin D levels and taking effective action to ensure we minimize the disabling/life-shortening aspects as much as possible. It's not as if the cost of £12 Years supply of 5000iu vitamin D3 is expensive or the £25 cost of postal 25(OH)D tests to check you are around 50ng/ml 125nmol/l are exorbitant.
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