Acupuncture, Acupressure Self Help

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Acupuncture, Acupressure Self Help

Postby vesta » Thu Jul 19, 2012 9:33 am

If I had known about Dr. Zamboni’s CCSVI theory that Multiple Sclerosis is essentially a vascular disease, I wouldn’t need a cane to walk today. I had all the tools for self help at my disposal, all I needed was the IDEA.
Well, now I have the idea. It comes a bit late for me, but I hope my suggestions can help others control if not outright heal the disease.

It’s Chinese Acupuncture theory which opened the door to this insight. Amazingly, Acupuncturists seem unaware of the possibilities their treatments can bestow, being limited (they and everyone else) by the idea that MS is an auto-immune disease. Let’s be clear. The auto-immune response is secondary to the true cause of MS, a blood reflux which injures the brain and spinal cord.

"In November 2009 Dr. Paolo Zamboni and colleagues reported that all patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) had abnormalities in veins in their neck or back that could be diagnosed using ultrasound." From Appendix 1 Lay Summary October 2011 of the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal.)

So let’s assume that the shortest distance between point A and point B is a straight line. Stress tenses up the neck and back. Veins draining the brain and spinal cord pass through the neck and back. Tensed muscles compress these veins thus impeding free flow of blood from the brain and spinal cord. Let’s consider treating the tension which knots up the muscles and deforms the veins. The Gall Bladder Meridian begins at the outer corner of the eye, runs over the side of the head, down the neck, down the upper shoulder under the arm, down the side of the body and legs to finish at the outer corner of the 4thtoe. The Bladder meridian begins at the inner corner of the eye, passes
over the head, down the back in 2 vessels parallel the spinal column, over the buttocks and down the back of the legs to end at the edge of the little toe. Since these are the main protective meridians which begin on the head and pass down the neck, over the shoulder or down the back they become the primary candidates for treating neck, shoulder and back stress which apparently “deform” the veins draining the Central Nervous System. End of story.

I get an acupuncture treatment once a month for maintenance. Tension builds up over the month until I feel like a clenched fist is knotting up my insides. The treatment opens up the fist like a flowering. I know the same relief when I swim. Now I realize that in both cases the blood flow has been freed.

Lest my insistence on this point makes me obnoxious, it IS the blood flow and the OXYGEN. Yesterday I was recovering from a minor cold. (I use the homeopathic remedy by Boiron, Oscillococcinum, to prevent or minimize a viral illness. The setback had been attenuated, but I was still feeling tense and dragged out. ) After swimming I felt SO much better, total relief. It’s the release of blood flow, the oxygen. Every time I experience that relief I can’t emphasize enough how important it is. I also can’t believe it. I’ve heard of oxygen therapy. If swimming is impossible–Acupuncture is a good replacement – oxygen therapy might work.)

It is therefore imperative that the Acupuncture therapist treats both the gall bladder and bladder (back) meridians. Both front and back of the body needs treatment. A traditional acupuncturist usually has several rooms so that he can treat patients consecutively which allows each to have a longer treatment. In France that often is not the case, so I have been treated by doctors who treat the back and then I lie down on an inclined table and the front is treated with the needles still in the back (taped flat.) (My Asiatic Doctors treats both front and back separately.) Your Doctor should be made aware of the CCSVI theory that veinous blood backs up into the brain and is need of release.

By accident I discovered that a point on the back slightly below where the neck meets the shoulder opens up the blood flow in the neck vein to give me much relief. This point belongs to the Gall Bladder meridian. Neither of my current Acupuncture doctors were aware of the importance of this point or of the CCSVI theory (even though the Gall Bladder meridian is known to be critical for MS treatment, but usually work is done on the leg.)
Not all acupuncture treatments are effective.

ACUPRESSURE SELF HELP: One evening while alone after learning about the CCSVI theory I could feel all the warning signs of an MS attack. I performed a TENS self acupressure treatment which relaxed me slightly but I was still worried about what the next day would bring. Well, the next day, the “attack” was gone. Just stopped in its tracks. That never happens without treatment. In fact once the MS process begins the stress feeds on itself, stress triggers it off and then the anxiety exacerbates it. So now, every morning I give myself a treatment. I’m probably in a progressive stage with occasional crisis. Often on waking I have the impression the blood flow is stagnating in my brain and doing some damage. So I get the flow going again. The summer of 1993 when I began to“lose” my legs, I made a terrible mistake. I listened to an Acupuncture Doctor who told me my TENS apparatus couldn’t do much. (I was using it to “balance” my meridiens in general because I had had an MS attack which caused me to limp.) True, the TENS self treatment is not as profound as a good acupuncture treatment, but now I realize it can and does get the blood flowing. It can stop brain damage. This doctor might have thought it wouldn’t do much good but it could do no harm, so why discourage me?

Now I will describe the basic TENS treatment I use as "maintenance" as well as to stop an impending "attack".
TENS stands for Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator which is sold to deliver small electrical impulses via electrode pads placed on the skin to ease pain. However, I use it to stimulate acupuncture points to open blood flow from the Central Nervous System. I use a small 9 volt battery powered apparatus (3.5¨ x 2.5¨or 9 cm x 6.5 cm). It has 2 controls linked to 2 leads which branch into 2 pads each, thereby giving the possibility of stimulating a total of 4 acupuncture points at a time. It can be purchased on the Internet in the US for about $50. I ordered one from England which was a bit more expensive. (You have to buy a supply of pads as well which come in packages of 4. The pads are adhesive. Eventually they stop adhering so I use tape for a while to extend their use longer.)

The basic principle is to balance 2 Yin points with 2 Yang points. The Yin Organs "nourish", the Yang "protect". One can consult the Acupuncture meridians on the internet at YingYangHouse.com. (The Spleen meridian runs up the INSIDE of the leg which isn't made clear on the chart.)

I now start with the upper back point to open circulation from the brain. I place a pad on the upper back just below (slightly outside) where the outside of neck meets the shoulder. (Acupressure points are sensitive so I poke around until I've found the point. This is apparently Gall Bladder 21 but the official description doesn't make much sense to me, so I follow my own idea of how to find it.) This Gall Bladder point "clears up" my head and I'm convinced it opens the blood flow from the head. For the complementary Yin point I use Spleen 10 which is found about 3 fingers up from the knee on the middle of the inside thigh. Again, this will be a very sensitive point. I place the pads from the lead on one side and then repeat the process on the other. Now I slowly turn on the "wheel" controls of the TENS unit to feel the electric impulses. (I don't touch the pads with my fingers when the unit is "on", the finger tips are very sensitive.) I get immediate relief with the upper back points. Also, if I start to have an "attack", this will stop it. Sometimes I'm not really aware that an attack has stopped, but by next morning the symptoms are gone.

I then turn to my original self treatment. I start with Spleen 6 which is a powerful Yin point. Called the 3 Yin it is the intersection of 3 Yin meridians - the Liver, Spleen and Kidney. (Warning – Don’t use needles on a pregnant woman. It’s good when giving birth.) The Spleen meridian runs up the INSIDE of the leg. I place 4 fingers at the top of the ankle bone along the leg bone, at the last finger I press into the leg to find a sensitive point, that's it. I place a pad over this point. Then I find the Yang Gall Bladder 34. I find the small bone on the outside of the knee. I press just below, slightly inside, this bone, (when an acupuncture needle is used one can feel an electric impluse down to the ankle.) I place a pad over this point on the same leg as the Spleen 6. I then do the same thing on the other leg with the second lead. Again I slowly turn on the "wheel" controls of the TENS unit to feel the electric impulses.

As an alternative Yang point I place the pad in the middle of the back of the knee which is Urinary Bladder 40, thinking this will open circulation from the spine

I don't know how effective this self-treatment will be for others. But it has changed my life. I used to live in dread of a breakdown. I can now control the stress and prevent “attacks”. The TENS device is a minor investment. I believe one should take confidence in one’s own healing powers.

(By the way, I received a diploma as an Acupressure Massage Therapist in 1987 from the Berkeley Acupressure Institute. I only practiced on myself, family and friends, but I have some knowledge of the subject. Ideally an Acupuncture Doctor or Acupressure Massage Therapist can help you get started. If you bring in these new ideas to your therapist, he/she might learn something which can help other patients. Amazingly enough, Acupuncturists are fixed on the auto-immune theory of MS and don't even realize the healing power of their own skills. Just don’t let some self important control freak discourage you.)
Taken from MS Cure Enigmas.net
Last edited by vesta on Thu Jul 26, 2012 12:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.
vesta
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Re: Acupuncture, Acupressure Self Help

Postby Serena42 » Fri Jul 20, 2012 10:09 am

Vesta,

Thank you for sharing your experience and this information. I would like to try this unit as I believe very strongly in the importance of blood flow with this disorder, being a former huge smoker and never, ever having any major illnesses prior to my diagnosis last year. I have chronic stress and figure that's just life and I certainly can't isolate myself to "living in a bubble" so to speak. I'm just afraid of placing the leads/pads on the wrong areas. I don't want to cause anymore damage. I know I always feel better when I leave my chiropractor's office. He's hooked me up to a similar machine and put the pads on the same area you described between the neck and shoulder blades. Maybe I should discuss this with him. He's young and has an uncle who has MS.
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Re: Acupuncture, Acupressure Self Help

Postby vesta » Fri Jul 20, 2012 10:50 am

Serena,
By all means discuss this with your chiropractor. I doubt any harm could come to you should you use the wrong area (actually it would simply mean you don't get the best results) but I know what it's like to feel like you're right on the edge of disaster and fear the slightest disturbance could push you over. Maybe talk to an acupuncturist as well. Thanks for the message. PS Rather than warn you against doing it, your therapist should show you HOW to do it.
vesta
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Re: Acupuncture, Acupressure Self Help

Postby Serena42 » Fri Dec 20, 2013 12:35 pm

Hello Vesta

It's been a while, but I finally purchased a TENS unit. Is there a diagram or can you be more specific about where to place the pads for the blood flow to the brain? When you poke around for the acupressure points, what do they feel like? I'm sorry to bother you about this again.

Thanks
Serena
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Re: Acupuncture, Acupressure Self Help

Postby vesta » Sun Dec 22, 2013 7:24 am

Hello Serena: I'm delighted to hear from you and that you have decided to try the TENS Acupressure. There is a diagram of the points/meridians on the site Yin/Yang house.com. Look up the Gall Bladder Meridian for the Yang, and the Spleen (which runs up the INSIDE of the leg) for the Yin. I've slightly modified the Blog post on Sept 9, 2013 (Tens Acupressure Self Help) - part of which I'll print here.

To find the shoulder point Gall Bladder 21 (GB21) I slide my hand down the neck, to top of the shoulder to above the nipple and slip the middle finger slightly on to the back, press the middle finger and you will find the sore point. That's it. Then put a pad on Spleen 10 Inside the thigh and repeat on the other side.

Next serie you use the outside knee point gall bladder 34 (GB34) (it's just below and Inside the outer knee bone - here you are unlikely to find a sore point - but with stimulation the "drop foot" will lift up.) As I've written below, place 4 fingers on top the ankle bone on the Inside leg, at the 4th press in, that's the powerful Spleen 6.

With experience this won't seem complicated at all. I don't know how effective this will be for you. Usually I wake up in a depressed mood and after the treatment I feel optimistic and hopeful again. A subtle change, but for me this means it has been effective. Also, if upset in the evening I do it to prevent a mini-attack. Do read the entire Blog post on Tens Acupressure.
I also hope you will read my latest blog post of December 12 "CCSVI: The Three Treatment Options" which shows how my thinking has evelved, especially in terms of self help.

I wish you a Happy Holiday Season. This is a stressful time of year, so we can use all the help we can get.

Feel free to ask me questions. Vesta

Quote from blog post TENS SELF HELP ACUPRESSURE"
"The basic principle is to balance 2 Yin points with 2 Yang points. The Yin Organs "nourish", the Yang
"protect". One can consult the Acupuncture meridians on the internet at YinYangHouse.com.

My original self treatment should be of use to every MS patient. I start with Spleen 6 which is a powerful Yin point. Called the 3 Yin it is the intersection of 3 Yin meridians - the Liver, Spleen and Kidney/Adrenals.
(Warning – Don’t use needles or “moxa” on a pregnant woman. It’s
good when giving birth.) The Spleen meridian runs up the INSIDE of the leg.
I place 4 fingers at the top of the ankle bone along the leg bone, at the last
finger I press into the leg to find a sensitive point, that's it. I
place a pad over this point. Then I find the Yang Gall Bladder 34. I find
the small bone on the outside of the knee. I press just below, slightly inside,
this bone, (when an acupuncture needle is used one can feel an electric impluse
down to the ankle.) I place a pad over this point on the same leg
as the Spleen 6. I then do the same thing on the other leg with the second lead
Again I slowly turn on the "wheel" controls of the TENS unit to
feel the electric impulses.

Drop Foot: If you increase the electric impulse on Gall Bladder 34 it will stimulate the "releveur" muscle and
lift up the foot. This is the "drop foot" muscle and if I had known this I would have tried to keep this muscle
working on my right side. (The muscle still works as a reflex, but I
can't make it work. Maybe continued stimulation will revive it, but at any
rate I will do everything to avoid losing the left side.)

As an alternative Yang point I place the pad in the middle of the back of the knee which is Urinary
Bladder 40, thinking this will open circulation from the spine. However, it can cramp the calves, so I go slowly.

In addition I now work the upper back point to open fluid circulation from the brain. I place a
pad where the outside of neck meets the shoulder in line with the nipple,
slightly below the top of the shoulder. This is Gall Bladder 21 "Shoulder Well".
(Acupressure points are sensitive so I poke around until I've found the
point.) This Gall Bladder point "clears up" my head and I'm convinced it opens
the blood flow from the head. For the complementary Yin point I use
Spleen 10 which is found about 3 fingers up from the knee on the middle of the
inside thigh. (An alternative would be Liver 9 found one third up the
inside of the thigh between the muscles.) Again, these will be very
sensitive points. I place the pads from the lead on one side and then repeat the
process on the other. Now I slowly turn on the "wheel" controls of the TENS
unit to feel the electric impulses. (I don't touch the pads with my
fingers when the unit is "on", the finger tips are very sensitive.) I get
immediate relief with the upper back points. Also, if I start to have
an "attack", this will stop it. Sometimes I'm not really aware that an attack
has stopped, but by next morning the symptoms are gone.

I don't know how effective this self-treatment will be for others. Since I now believe my
first known MS attack struck the upper spinal cord, it may be the upper back
GB21 point may be more effective for me than others. The GB34 knee point has
almost ALWAYS been used in my Acupuncture treatments so I believe it should be
of use to everyone." End of quote.

MS Cure Enigmas.net
vesta
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Posts: 313
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 10:10 am
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