MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby PointsNorth » Tue Apr 30, 2013 11:16 am

Has anyone seed this article?

Look at the range of problems that are solved: . . . . New therapeutic opportunities from an ancient herb.

http://www.advancedholistichealth.org/P ... rticle.pdf

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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby HappyPoet » Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:15 pm

Notice the prison sentences: Second-degree vehicular manslaughter equals the prison time for violation of the Controlled Substances Act for being in the marijuana business. I am thoroughly disgusted.

Even when 'legal,' marijuana is risky business

Business owners are jailed and often face mandatory minimum sentences of five years or more in federal prison.

http://money.cnn.com/2013/04/29/smallbu ... ?hpt=hp_t5

Marijuana is still illegal at the federal level, and that's a dilemma for pot entrepreneurs in states that legalized it.

At the local level, pot businesses are often welcomed by politicians and sheriffs alike. Medical marijuana is legal in 18 states and the District of Columbia. Most recently, Colorado and Washington legalized it for recreational use too.

But pot is still listed in the nation's Controlled Substances Act. Federal raids of pot businesses in those states continue at a feverish pace. In 2012 alone, federal agencies seized more than 2,500 indoor grow operations, killing close to 300,000 plants.

"The feds are saying one thing. The states are saying another," said Sean Cecil, a criminal defense attorney in Seattle. He is also a member of the Cannabis Defense Coalition, which raises awareness of pot laws.

The situation makes the so-called legal marijuana industry a risky one. A dispensary could be in full compliance with state laws, but the feds could still raid them.

Still, not every grower, seller and user is a federal target. Top U.S. Justice Department officials have issued two memos -- orders, essentially -- explaining how federal prosecutors are to deal with state-legalized marijuana.

One, in 2009, says U.S. attorneys shouldn't make it a priority to prosecute caregivers and seriously ill patients abiding by state laws.

"Prosecution of [patients and caregivers] in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state law... is unlikely to be an efficient use of limited federal resources," it states.

But another memo, issued in 2011, clarified that those protections don't extend to business owners.

"Persons who are in the business of cultivating, selling or distributing marijuana, and those who knowingly facilitate such activities, are in violation of the Controlled Substances Act, regardless of state law," it says.

So, what happens to a raided business?

If a dispensary or grow farm is raided, plants are destroyed. Cash and equipment is confiscated. Business owners are jailed and often face mandatory minimum sentences of five years or more in federal prison.

Those on the periphery face dangers as well. Investors in a business could lose money they put into the operation. And banks that deal with cannabis businesses open themselves up to accusations of money laundering.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Drunk-driver-gets-prison-in-fatal-crash

She was sentenced to 1 2/3 to 5 years in prison and must pay $2,200 in restitution.

http://www.timesunion.com/default/artic ... 394734.php
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby blossom » Sun May 26, 2013 9:44 pm

http://www.cana-med.ca/hemp_oil.html

anyone deal with or familiar with this?
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby jennykash » Mon Jun 10, 2013 8:16 pm

My husband has PPMS and a MMAR license in Canada. We are travelling to the Florida keys for a vacation in December and I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions re: finding medicine... I am pretty worried that he won't be able to cope with his symptoms without it!
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby HappyPoet » Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:55 pm

Hi jennykash,

I'm sorry to say that your husband's MMAR card won't be valid in the US. I don't take vacations unless I can take marijuana with me--I wouldn't trust sourcing it from a stranger in a strange place, unless you were in the states of Colorado or Washington which now have (licensed, iirc) retail stores for marijuana. The other US states that allow medical marijuana have residency requirements before rx cards are issued.

Best wishes.
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby jennykash » Thu Jun 13, 2013 7:25 pm

Thanks happy post. That's what we figured but I was hoping maybe there was another option. We're looking into capsules which might be our only option.
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby HappyPoet » Thu Jun 13, 2013 7:49 pm

capsules?
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby jennykash » Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:43 am

Still getting info on them...called CBD rich capsules.
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby blossom » Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:25 pm

please watch some of the utubes that come up after sam suds is over. most here realize plastic is bad-but the way we as a society got dupped by such toxicity that those in charge in about every way possible have managed to ruin our health and destroy the earth because of corruption and greed--

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpmE_b90XTU

now, if you watched the above--this is how it pertains to legalization of hemp, cannabis, marijauna. and, the health of not only us, but even more important, the younger ones that will inherit this mess. when you see a baby, some their first meal comes from a "plastic" bottle. on and on.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/106 ... er-bottles

http://www.collective-evolution.com/... ... -stronger/

http://www.hempplastic.com/what-hemp.html

then they still want to deny us the plant that has the medicinal value to help those that their corrupt greedy hands played the part in bringing and dumping all their filth in our laps. -- and just think how much better off the world could have been. "do you think this hasn't been "one" of the big players in disease?" plus!

the dirty dirty sewer rats that are large and in charge.

but, it's still against the law to have and use mj. according to the feds. ---ONE OF THE BIGGEST SCAMS PULLED ON HUMANITY AND THE WORLD"! these postage stamp sized legalization--one state you can have 3 plants another 2 or 10 or some can get a script "but ins. doesn't pay" or maybe 1 dispensary if any in the whole state. on and on. "BS" PLAIN AND
SIMPLE!!
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby blossom » Thu Jul 18, 2013 9:51 am

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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby HappyPoet » Thu Jul 18, 2013 11:06 am

Five of the Drug War's Less Obvious Casualties

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/norm-stam ... 31804.html

There's little chance we'll hear even a whisper about the drug war during the parties' nominating conventions in Tampa and Charlotte. This, despite the calamitous, irrefutable harms caused by U.S. drug policy: the trillion dollars squandered trying to win a nonsensical, unwinnable war; the tens of millions of Americans arrested for nonviolent drug offenses over the past 40 years; the obscene death count in Mexico, the casualties on our own home soil.

That the drug war will get little or no play in the parties' platforms is a product of fear and political calculation. What both Democrats and Republicans fail to grasp is just how far behind public opinion they lag, especially on marijuana issues. Recent polls show an overwhelming majority (70 percent) of Americans favoring the legalization of medical marijuana, and a solid majority (50-56 percent) in support of regulated marijuana for recreational purposes. (The figures are much higher in the west, and among young, Democratic and independent voters, with conservatives showing growing support as well.)

Perhaps we can get the attention of the parties by focusing on five less obvious yet comparably dreadful byproducts of the drug war, conditions that millions of Americans are forced to live with daily.

1. Depressed property values and diminished quality of life. Not all of the physical deterioration in blighted communities can be traced to joblessness, underwater mortgages, vacant and repossessed homes. In fact, open-air drug markets, hand-to-hand street dealing, drug-related drive-by shootings and home invasion robberies have long afflicted inner city (and, increasingly, rural) neighborhoods.

I've worked in such neighborhoods, talked to numerous residents who've struggled against this reality, day after day, year after year. I've seen the proliferation of "For Sale" signs as families try to unload deeply depreciated homes in the futile hope of moving to a safer community. Were it not for drug trafficking, most of these neighborhoods would have an entirely different, much more secure and optimistic feel to them.

2. Strained community-police relations. Those arrested for nonviolent drug offenses are overwhelmingly young, poor, black or brown -- traditional prey for abusive cops. Reconciliation between police officers and minorities is possible; working together to build safer, healthier communities is achievable. But not so long as local cops embody the values and carry out the duties of frontline warriors in the feds' War on Drugs.

3. Increased police militarization. Enemies are pretty much essential to a war, and enemy combatants in the drug war are easy to spot (see above). 9/11 only added, albeit significantly, to a preexisting condition of police militarization. Thanks to the drug war, American cops have become more soldier-like in appearance, armament and tactics. This paramilitary mentality has enlarged the "us-them" gap between a community's police officers and its citizens. While certainly not acceptable, it's not hard to understand how cops come to dehumanize "targets" in drug busts. (Or an Occupy protest, for that matter.)

A five a.m. drug raid, replete with shouting, uniformed intruders and flashbang grenades, is not something people will ever forget -- especially if shots are fired, and family members or pets are struck. The tactics of the drug war are inherently militaristic, inherently violent.

(The drug war also explains other abuses we see in modern policing: illegal stop and frisk practices; other violations of the Fourth Amendment [which bars unlawful searches and seizures]; character-challenged cops planting dope or guns or converting seized drugs to their own use.)

We need to come to terms with the fact that, for millions of Americans, community cops function more as an entitled, occupying force than a public safety resource.

4. Damage to the economy. Suffice to say, throwing upwards of 70 billion dollars annually at the "drug problem" (making matters worse, not better) takes a huge chunk out of both national and local treasuries. Money that could be put to much better use in prevention and treatment programs. And in attacking predatory crime like burglaries, robberies, auto thefts, car prowls, domestic violence, child abuse, rape and other sexual assaults -- crimes that frighten us, that cause us to change the way we live.

5. Disrespect for the rule of law, and for government. "Nothing," wrote Albert Einstein, "is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced." If U.S. drug laws were truly enforceable, there'd be no drug war.

But when, for example, over 100 million Americans have acknowledged using marijuana, when the president and at least two of his predecessors, along with the mayor of New York City and uncountable other notables in public life are known to have used pot and/or other drugs you have a clear picture of the unenforceability of our drug laws. Not to mention the hypocrisy of our leaders. Imagine if Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Michael Bloomberg had been busted for their "youthful indiscretions," had earned the label, "convicted drug offender." We wouldn't know their names today.

When the nation's drug czar informs us, in all his medical wisdom, that cannabis has no established medicinal value, or when he defends pot's classification as a "Schedule I" drug, alongside heroin, the legitimacy and credibility of governance suffers. Likewise, when congress fails to entertain legislation that would transfer drug control from the criminal justice to the public health system. Where it so clearly belongs.

If our political parties are too dense or too timid to end the drug war, the states will have to do the job.

Which is precisely how alcohol prohibition was defeated. Starting with New York and quickly picking up steam in other parts of the country, the people repealed the 13-year ban on alcohol and replaced it with sensible, regulated legalization.

This November, voter initiatives in Washington, Colorado, and Oregon will, if passed, put these three states on a collision course with the federal government.

Freedom-loving, responsible Americans ought to welcome that collision. It's long overdue.

This post is part of the HuffPost Shadow Conventions 2012, a series spotlighting three issues that are not being discussed at the national GOP and Democratic conventions: The Drug War, Poverty in America, and Money in Politics.

HuffPost Live will be taking a comprehensive look at America's failed war on drugs August 28th and September 4th from 12-4 pm ET and 6-10 pm ET. Click here to check it out -- and join the conversation.
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby blossom » Thu Jul 18, 2013 2:24 pm

yes poet-more political bs.

aaahh, the war on drugs! talk about talking out both sides of their mouths check this out.

http://www.naturalnews.com/034289_Afgha ... trade.html

http://www.globalresearch.ca/are-americ ... um/5309922


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChIF6yvTL6k

now, i'm in no way bashing our troops they are only following orders as the law inforcement does here. but, the law makers seem to do as they please to benefit or line their and their buddies pockets.

and they won't legalize hemp straight across the board!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

two faced greedy liars!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! billions of dollars spent-thousands of lives lost. and they try to classify hemp with stuff like this.--one read said it's their culture we don't wanna make hard feelings. well, as history here in the usa reveals hemp was very much a part of our culture but they didn't hesitate makeing it illegal and criminals of the good people growing or useing it.

what a crock!!!!!
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby HappyPoet » Thu Aug 08, 2013 10:41 am

blossom, this one's for you! A new, strong voice for us!

Finally, finally, finally, finally, finally, finally someone in the mainstream media will be helping us!

CNN's Sanjay Gupta: "Why I changed my mind on weed."

http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/08/health/gu ... ?hpt=hp_t1
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby David1949 » Thu Aug 08, 2013 1:18 pm

If you want freedom start voting Libertarian, or vote for Libertarian leaning candidates like Ron Paul. On the other hand if you want government to run your life for you then vote for the Rs or the Ds.
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Re: MARIJAUNA BEING ILLEGAL IS PURE "BS"-PLAIN AND SIMPLE

Postby Loriyas » Thu Aug 08, 2013 1:27 pm

^ what David said!!!
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