Dr Calabresi webcast

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Dr Calabresi webcast

Postby bromley » Mon Mar 13, 2006 10:12 am

The NMSS has a webcast today (as part of MS week) featuring Dr Calabresi - 'Repair of MS damage and Protection of the Nervous System'.

Attached is the transcript.

Not too much new stuff but it looks like they are looking at existing drugs which should speed up the work.

Ian


http://skins.broadbandvideo.com/nmss2/2 ... script.pdf
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Postby scoobyjude » Mon Mar 13, 2006 7:20 pm

Wow this is exciting to hear. It would be great if they can repair the myelin and give us more time for them to find a cure. I'm assuming that if they use already FDA approved medication that all they will have to prove is effectiveness so the trial should be shorter- or am I just wishful thinking? It was nice to hear a top researcher state confidently that this is going to happen because sometimes I think I am delusional for being so optimistic. Does anyone know if it is believed that older plaques may be able to be remyelinated or is it just newer ones that still have partial remyelination occuring? Also, how about axons that have already been damaged? Either way, great news!!
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Postby Shayk » Mon Mar 13, 2006 8:53 pm

Scoobyjude--

You asked:
Does anyone know if it is believed that older plaques may be able to be remyelinated or is it just newer ones that still have partial remyelination occuring? Also, how about axons that have already been damaged?


Here's something on the topic which seems to suggest remyelination is possible. I don't know though if it's in "older plaques".
CNS Axons Retain their Competence for Myelination Throughout Life
there are no changes in axons remaining unmyelinated for many months that would prevent effective remyelination. This finding suggests that chronically demyelinated regions of axons such as those in seen in multiple sclerosis are likely to remain competent to be remyelinated.


I have no idea about repairing axons.

Sharon
Last edited by Shayk on Mon Mar 13, 2006 9:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby scoobyjude » Mon Mar 13, 2006 9:11 pm

Who knows Sharon, they may play a part yet. If that is what you believe then who am I or anyone else to tell you differently. You have done a lot or research that supports your theory and I have to say it makes a lot of sense. I've always thought that the fact that pregnant women suffer less relapses shows that hormones affect MS. Whatever keeps you going I say. I was asking about older plaques in regards to those with SPMS and those who have had MS longer. My plaques are pretty new so I hope that they will be able to be remyelinated. I hope that this will be a promising treatments for all types of MS.
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Postby Shayk » Mon Mar 13, 2006 9:25 pm

Hi again Scoobyjude--

I just deleted the part about "axotomy". It really pertained to saving motoneurons and not axons. Sorry about that and I regret the information I shared didn't address your question either.

Sharon
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Postby scoobyjude » Tue Mar 14, 2006 10:30 pm

Sharon, actually what you posted did pertain to my question. From what I read it seems that even chronically demyelinated axons and I'm assuming plaques still have the ability to be remyelinated. Although, I could be wrong because I am not very scientifically inclined. That's why I need all of you to read the articles and tell me what they mean :D
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