Amyloid-forming proteins may lead to therapies for MS

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Amyloid-forming proteins may lead to therapies for MS

Postby MSUK » Fri Apr 05, 2013 2:51 am

Amyloid-forming proteins may lead to therapies for MS and other neurodegenerative diseases

Amyloids - clumps of misfolded proteins found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders - are the quintessential bad boys of neurobiology. They're thought to muck up the seamless workings of the neurons responsible for memory and movement, and researchers around the world have devoted themselves to devising ways of blocking their production or accumulation in humans..... Read More - http://www.ms-uk.org/index.cfm/amyloids
MS-UK - http://www.ms-uk.org/
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Re: Amyloid-forming proteins may lead to therapies for MS

Postby lyndacarol » Fri Apr 05, 2013 5:25 pm

Insulin-Degrading Enzyme (IDE) breaks down insulin, as the name indicates. It also breaks down amyloid beta. BUT IDE is preferentially drawn to insulin FIRST. If the insulin level is high, IDE may be totally consumed in the process of insulin degradation – leaving little or no IDE remaining to degrade the amyloid beta.

This was the discovery of Dr. Dennis J Selkoe, Harvard researcher, several years ago and is his explanation for Alzheimer's disease, which is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid beta in the brain. http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchArt ... ne.0005274

I think a therapy which increases Insulin-Degrading Enzyme (IDE) would improve both Alzheimer's and MS, since I believe most, if not all, of my MS symptoms are due to excess insulin affecting the muscles.
My hypothesis: excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia) plays a major role in MS, as developed in my initial post: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-discussion-f1/topic1878.html "Insulin – Could This Be the Key?"
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