mushrooms raise levels of vitamin D

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.

mushrooms raise levels of vitamin D

Postby Cece » Tue Apr 23, 2013 8:54 am

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Endocrinolo ... logy/38605
Eating mushrooms may be as effective at raising serum vitamin D levels as taking capsuled supplements, researchers reported here.

Results are from a small randomized trial.
Cece
Family Elder
 
Posts: 9018
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2010 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Re: mushrooms raise levels of vitamin D

Postby jimmylegs » Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:07 am

Bioavailability of vitamin D2 from UV-B-irradiated button mushrooms in healthy adults deficient in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D: a randomized controlled trial (2011)
http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v65/ ... 1153a.html
Mushrooms contain very little or any vitamin D2 but are abundant in ergosterol, which can be converted into vitamin D2 by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Our objective was to investigate the bioavailability of vitamin D2 from vitamin D2-enhanced mushrooms by UV-B in humans, and comparing it with a vitamin D2 supplement.
Subjects/Methods: Fresh mushrooms were irradiated with an UV-B dose of 1.5 J/cm2, increasing vitamin D2 content from <1 to 491 μg/100 g and made to an experimental soup. In this 5-week, single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 26 young subjects with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) less than or equal to50 nmol/l were randomly assigned into three groups ((a) mushroom, (b) supplement and (c) placebo). They received during winter (a) 28 000 IU (700 μg) vitamin D2 via the experimental soup, or (b) 28 000 IU vitamin D2 via a supplement or (c) placebo, respectively.
Results: After 2 weeks, serum 25OHD was significantly higher in the mushroom than in the placebo group (P=0.001). The serum 25OHD concentrations in the mushroom and supplement groups rose significantly and similarly over the study period by 3.9 nmol/l (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.9, 4.8) and by 4.7 nmol/l per week (95% CI: 3.8, 5.7), respectively.
Conclusions: We are the first to demonstrate in humans that the bioavailability of vitamin D2 from vitamin D2-enhanced button mushrooms via UV-B irradiation was effective in improving vitamin D status and not different to a vitamin D2 supplement

Ergocalciferol from Mushrooms or Supplements Consumed with a Standard Meal Increases 25-Hydroxyergocalciferol but Decreases 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol in the Serum of Healthy Adults (2012)
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/142/7/1246.short
Few foods contain ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol. Treatment of mushrooms with UV light increases ergocalciferol content and could provide a dietary source of vitamin D. We evaluated the impact of consuming UV-treated white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) on the vitamin D status of healthy adults. Thirty-eight volunteers were randomized to 4 treatments consumed with a standard meal for 6 wk: the control (C) group received untreated mushrooms providing 0.85 μg/d ergocalciferol (n = 10); groups M1 and M2 received UV-treated mushrooms providing 8.8 (n = 10) and 17.1 μg/d (n = 9), respectively; and the supplement (S) group received purified ergocalciferol plus untreated mushrooms, providing a total of 28.2 μg/d (n = 9). Serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and 25-hydroxyergocalciferol [25(OH)D2] were 83 ± 38 and 2.4 ± 2.0 nmol/L, respectively, at baseline (mean ± SD). At wk 6, 25(OH)D2 had increased and was higher in all treatment groups than in the C group, whereas 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D3] had decreased and was lower in the M2 and S groups than in the C group. Increases in 25(OH)D2 for groups C, M1, M2, and S were 1.2 ± 5.2, 13.8 ± 7.3, 12.7 ± 3.7, and 32.8 ± 3.3 nmol/L and decreases in 25(OH)D3 were −3.9 ± 16.3, −10.4 ± 6.4, −20.6 ± 14.6, and −29.5 ± 15.9 nmol/L, respectively. Concentrations did not change in group C. In summary, ergocalciferol was absorbed and metabolized to 25(OH)D2 but did not affect vitamin D status, because 25(OH)D3 decreased proportionally.

WEIRD why did they go to rat study :S

Vitamin D2 from light-exposed edible mushrooms is safe, bioavailable and effectively supports bone growth in rats (2013)
http://link.springer.com/article/10.100 ... 012-1934-9
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 9025
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm


Return to General Discussion

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service