Amiloride

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Amiloride

Postby gibbledygook » Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:19 am

Amiloride has been around for donkey's years. It is safe but is a diuretic so ought to be making me want to visit the privy rather more frequently. So far so good. What is very exciting here is that the acid sensing channels are genetically implicated in a Sardinian population of MS patients. I have been on the this drug approximately one week and I have not needed the toilet more frequently than usual but I am on only a half dose. I will increase the dose shortly and report in...

Brain. 2013 Jan;136(Pt 1):106-15. doi: 10.1093/brain/aws325.
Targeting ASIC1 in primary progressive multiple sclerosis: evidence of neuroprotection with amiloride.
Arun T, Tomassini V, Sbardella E, de Ruiter MB, Matthews L, Leite MI, Gelineau-Morel R, Cavey A, Vergo S, Craner M, Fugger L, Rovira A, Jenkinson M, Palace J.
Source
Division of Clinical Neurology, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
Abstract
Neurodegeneration is the main cause for permanent disability in multiple sclerosis. The effect of current immunomodulatory treatments on neurodegeneration is insufficient. Therefore, direct neuroprotection and myeloprotection remain an important therapeutic goal. Targeting acid-sensing ion channel 1 (encoded by the ASIC1 gene), which contributes to the excessive intracellular accumulation of injurious Na(+) and Ca(2+) and is over-expressed in acute multiple sclerosis lesions, appears to be a viable strategy to limit cellular injury that is the substrate of neurodegeneration. While blockade of ASIC1 through amiloride, a potassium sparing diuretic that is currently licensed for hypertension and congestive cardiac failure, showed neuroprotective and myeloprotective effects in experimental models of multiple sclerosis, this strategy remains untested in patients with multiple sclerosis. In this translational study, we tested the neuroprotective effects of amiloride in patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. First, we assessed ASIC1 expression in chronic brain lesions from post-mortem of patients with progressive multiple sclerosis to identify the target process for neuroprotection. Second, we tested the neuroprotective effect of amiloride in a cohort of 14 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging markers of neurodegeneration as outcome measures of neuroprotection. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging scans before (pretreatment phase) and during (treatment phase) amiloride treatment for a period of 3 years. Whole-brain volume and tissue integrity were measured with high-resolution T(1)-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. In chronic brain lesions of patients with progressive multiple sclerosis, we demonstrate an increased expression of ASIC1 in axons and an association with injury markers within chronic inactive lesions. In patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis, we observed a significant reduction in normalized annual rate of whole-brain volume during the treatment phase, compared with the pretreatment phase (P = 0.018, corrected). Consistent with this reduction, we showed that changes in diffusion indices of tissue damage within major clinically relevant white matter (corpus callosum and corticospinal tract) and deep grey matter (thalamus) structures were significantly reduced during the treatment phase (P = 0.02, corrected). Our results extend evidence of the contribution of ASIC1 to neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis and suggest that amiloride may exert neuroprotective effects in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis. This pilot study is the first translational study on neuroprotection targeting ASIC1 and supports future randomized controlled trials measuring neuroprotection with amiloride in patients with multiple sclerosis.
PMID: 23365093 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23365093
3 years antibiotics, 06/09 bilateral jug stents at C1, 05/11 ballooning of both jug valves, 07/12 stenting of renal vein, azygos & jug valve ballooning,
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Re: Amiloride

Postby Anonymoose » Fri Apr 26, 2013 1:01 pm

I'm very curious about this one. I hope it works!! I'll be watching for updates. :D
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Re: Amiloride

Postby CureOrBust » Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:38 pm

gibbledygook, I looked up what it was on the wiki, and saw a link to a "longer acting" substance you may also wish to look into Benzamil
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Re: Amiloride

Postby gibbledygook » Fri May 03, 2013 8:18 am

okay, so I do think that Amiloride may very well be a bit of a game changer for me but it is still early days. I started on 5mg daily although the trial used 10mg but I noticed after only a few days that the amiloride made my leg a bit stiffer. However this has now settled down a bit and I am now on the 10mg dose. Amiloride affects synaptic transmission so I don't think that this increased spasticity, though unpleasant, is unexpected for my damaged nerves.
The trial has won an award from the MS Society.

Thanks to Dr Gavin Giovannoni at Barts hospital and his excellent blog, where I read about amiloride [url]. http://multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.co.uk/[/url]
3 years antibiotics, 06/09 bilateral jug stents at C1, 05/11 ballooning of both jug valves, 07/12 stenting of renal vein, azygos & jug valve ballooning,
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