Some Interesting Connections

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Re: Some Interesting Connections

Postby CaveMan » Mon Dec 02, 2013 12:37 am

Thank you for the glowing endorsement,
I did actually read your paper before commenting, but couldn't be bothered tracking it any further because they always end up in a beaurocratic blind alley.
Not really much of a paper with only 7 references linked to support the assumptions.
Just on the Aluminium Adjuvants there,
How exactly did they come to their conclusion on that one?
- They rubbished two papers which suggested that there may be a problem with using aluminium as an adjuvant and used the GFDA recomendations as their pro argument to say it's safe, hardly watertight by any means.
Reading into the FDA safety allowance for ingestion of Aluminium and corrolating that to an amount directly injected into the blood stream, how is this relevant?
Any time food is ingested the immune system goes into overdrive, digestion is one of the riskiest functions as we need to absorb large nutrient molecules but at the same time we need to keep toxins & pathogens out, or at the very least deal with them promptly, so it's obvious that ingested aluminium will be dealt with in a completely different manner to injected aluminium.
Just for those who may not be aware of what an Adjuvant is:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adjuvant
Basically the aluminium acts as an irritant at the injection site to increase physiological damage, that the body will assume is caused by the minute quantity of antigen presented, otherwise without the adjuvant the inate immune system would simply clean up the injected mess and no antibodies would be created.
While where on the topic it might be a good idea maybe for the WHO & FDA to maybe consider the potential links in using nut oils & shellfish proteins as carriers in vaccines and explain the increasing rates of allergies to these food products in children these days, it seems that there is little evidence to show that the vaccines actually do what their supposed to and a lot of circumstantial evidence to suggest they are doing harm in other areas.

Just to clarify my position,
Yes I am a vaccination skeptic, I do agree the process of vaccination has helped us to increase quality of life immensly over the last 100 years, but I think we have passed the point of maximum benefit now and the focus of vaccinations on less deadly diseases has balanced the scales where vaccination risks far outweigh any benefits that may be recieved.
I am just an interested individual trying to crack the autoimmune nut.
Partner has Graves Disease, 5 years, showing good test results, looking forward to potential remission in the near future.
3 friends have MS, 1 just recently diagnosed, severity 7/10.
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Re: Some Interesting Connections

Postby Leonard » Mon Dec 02, 2013 1:32 am

CaveMan wrote:Just to clarify my position,
Yes I am a vaccination skeptic, I do agree the process of vaccination has helped us to increase quality of life immensly over the last 100 years, but I think we have passed the point of maximum benefit now and the focus of vaccinations on less deadly diseases has balanced the scales where vaccination risks far outweigh any benefits that may be recieved.


I share this view.
EBV may be awakened because of immune system (read gut vaccination induced) disorder.

Food is also a factor.
I find this intriguing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death
The 14 century pandemic is allegedly linked to an overconsumption of wheat.

Trends in societal health may be telling.
The current surge of autoimmune diseases is an important signal that needs to be taken serious.

Our current system for medical care is in a deadly spiral, in particular as regards the diagnosis of chronic (read in particular immune system) diseases.
New insight in MS may help transform the health care system.
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Re: Some Interesting Connections

Postby MSandI » Mon Dec 02, 2013 7:28 am

I am in total agreement with caveman and leonard. What was not discussed is the adverse effects of vaccines that are published but not shared with the person taking the vaccine. You have to dig deep to find the adverse effects, but yet the ratio of adverse effects seems way to low considering the amount of people who question their medical condition verses vaccines. Just a thought that I consider every day.
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Re: Some Interesting Connections

Postby Annesse » Thu Dec 05, 2013 11:28 am

I thought these studies provided additional evidence on the association between vitamin B12 and MS.

In the following study the researchers concluded that the damage caused by a vitamin B12 deficiency is manifested as an increase in the number of cells positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (a protein released by astrocytes during pathological processes in the central nervous system).

Prog Neurobiol. 2009 Jul;88(3):203-20. doi: 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2009.04.004. Epub 2009 Apr 24.
The multi-faceted basis of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) neurotrophism in adult central nervous system: Lessons learned from its deficiency.
Scalabrino G.

“Glial cells, myelin and the interstitium are the structures of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) mainly affected by vitamin B(12) (cobalamin, Cbl) deficiency. Most of the response to the damage caused by Cbl deficiency seems to come from astrocytes and microglia, and is manifested as an increase in the number of cells positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein…”


Researchers in the following study concluded that patients with MS has increased levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and that GFAP levels correlated with neurological disablility and disease progression.

J Neurol. 2011 May;258(5):882-8. doi: 10.1007/s00415-010-5863-2. Epub 2011 Jan 1.
Glial fibrillary acidic protein: a potential biomarker for progression in multiple sclerosis.
Axelsson M, Malmeström C, Nilsson S, Haghighi S, Rosengren L, Lycke J.

“The major intermediate cytoskeletal protein of astrocytes, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)…may…be released into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during pathological processes in the central nervous system (CNS)…MS patients had increased GFAP levels compared with controls…and GFAP levels correlated with neurological disability…and disease progression…GFAP level at the first examination had predictive value for neurological disability 8-10 years later…GFAP, a marker for astrogliosis, is a potential biomarker for MS progression and may have a role in clinical trials for assessing the impact of therapies on MS progression.”
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Re: Some Interesting Connections

Postby Annesse » Fri Dec 13, 2013 6:51 pm

I ran across this study on homocysteine and cerebral small vessel disease. The researchers concluded this effect may be mediated via endothelial dysfunction.

Brain. 2004 Jan;127(Pt 1):212-9. Epub 2003 Nov 7.
Homocysteine is a risk factor for cerebral small vessel disease, acting via endothelial dysfunction.
Hassan A, Hunt BJ, O'Sullivan M, Bell R, D'Souza R, Jeffery S, Bamford JM, Markus HS.

"...In conclusion, hyperhomocysteinaemia is an independent risk factor for SVD, particularly ischaemic leukoaraiosis, and this effect may be mediated via endothelial dysfunction."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14607791

I have also been posting additional research on my Facebook page (check profile).
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Re: Some Interesting Connections

Postby cervocuit » Thu Jan 30, 2014 3:30 am

Hi Annesse,
I have very little knowledge in biology. I have read your topic partially but i didn’t found what i searched.
Where does proteases come from ? What do you think is the cause of this missing enzyme, and what can we do about it ?
Can you make it short ?
Thanks in advance
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Re: Some Interesting Connections

Postby Annesse » Sat Feb 01, 2014 1:34 pm

Hi cervocuit~

Protease and DNase 1 originate in the exocrine pancreas. Your body makes your enzymes, which are proteins, just like it makes all of your bodily proteins-by digesting dietary proteins. In order to properly digest proteins, you need sufficient HCL, beneficial bacteria, and of course the enzymes designed for this purpose-protease and DNase 1. So, it is just a circle really. Even your HCL is produced from the digestion of proteins. You need to keep your pancreas and entire GI tract healthy in order to keep this cycle going.

Also, many things can destroy these enzymes--fluoride, certain medications, etc.

There isn't really one thing you can do that will restore the function of your entire GI tract. The entire last section of our book is devoted to doing this. There are different foods that will help you replenish these enzymes and digest proteins while you are going about this though. Fermented foods such as raw organic fermented sauerkraut will help tremendously.
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