Three genes linked to longer life

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Three genes linked to longer life

Postby NHE » Sat May 13, 2006 2:47 am

This article was published in the Seattle Times not too long ago (I apologize for not having the exact date as failed to note it when I saved the article). It may be of general interest here as the genes discussed are involved in lipid metabolism, insulin, and inflammation.

    Scientists link 3 genes to secret of long life
    By Jamie Talan, Newsday

    Only one in every 10,000 people will celebrate a century of life, and scientist have identified three genes that can help achieve that age. Having any one of these genes can confer a longer, healthier life. "People with exceptionally long lives offer us a shortcut in understanding diseases and what prevents them," said Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. He Studied 300 Ashkenazi Jews between 95 and 108 years old and their children, many of whom themselves have lived beyond the average life span - 77.6 years. Thirty percent of these families had one of these three genes, compared with 5% of people without a history of longevity. One gene, called CETP, was present in 8% of 65-yearolds. The incidence jumped to 25% in those who made it to 105. CETP regulates lipoproteins which shuttle cholesterol and triglycerides through the bloodstream. CETP increases the good form of cholesterol, HDL. Those who inherited this rare form also showed no signs of dementia, seen in 50% of people older than 85. Barzilai reported the findings last week at a meeting on dementia, sponsored by Albert Einstein College. Another longevity gene identified is called apoC-III, also involved in lipid metabolism. The third gene is APM1, involved in regulation of insulin and the inflammatory process. In the future, scientists could develop medicines to manipulate proteins made by these genes, Barzilai said, adding that Pfizer is testing a cholesterol-lowering drug that seems to do the same thing CETP does. Environment plays a key role in determining life span as well. But, Barzilai said, "I have people who have smoked for 75 years, others who eat lots of meat and little vegetables, and others who have never exercised. Thirty percent are overweight or obese. The genes seems to protect them from these environmental risks."

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Re: Three genes linked to longevity

Postby NHE » Sat May 13, 2006 4:02 am

Here's some more general information on APM1, the gene product of which is known as adiponectin.

    Definition of Adiponectin
    Adiponectin: A protein hormone produced and secreted exclusively by adipocytes (fat cells) that regulates the metabolism of lipids and glucose. Adiponectin influences the body's response to insulin. Adiponectin also has antiinflammatory effects on the cells lining the walls of blood vessels.

    High blood levels of adiponectin are associated with a reduced risk of heart attack. Low levels of adiponectin are found in people who are obese (and who are at increased risk of a heart attack).

    Adipocytes produce and secrete a number of proteins, including leptin, adipsin, properdin, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). An adipose tissue-specific factor was isolated and termed APM1 (AdiPose Most abundant gene transcript 1). The protein product of APM1 is adiponectin. The APM1 gene maps to chromosome 3q27.

There are also many papers available through PubMed.

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