S1PR2...does anyone know what this means?

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Re: S1PR2...does anyone know what this means?

Postby MSandI » Mon May 12, 2014 3:03 pm

Hi Annesse
I am officially lost. I thought I had to have extra b12 because I have ms.
Ann
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Re: S1PR2...does anyone know what this means?

Postby Annesse » Mon May 12, 2014 3:21 pm

I think the important thing is to restore your body's ability to metabolize vitamin B12.
Numerous studies have shown that MS patients lack vitamin B12 due to an inability to properly metabolize the vitamin. For instance, researchers in the following study found that MS patients had significantly lower vitamin B12 levels and concluded: “There is a significant association between MS and disturbed vitamin B12 metabolism.”

Vitamin B12 metabolism in multiple sclerosis.
Reynolds EH, Bottiglieri T, Laundy M, Crellin RF, Kirker SG. 1992. Arch Neurol.
49(6):649-52.



“…Patients with MS had significantly lower serum vitamin B12 levels…than neurological and normal controls…There is a significant association between MS and disturbed vitamin B12 metabolism…The cause of the vitamin B12 disorder and the nature of the overlap with MS deserve further investigation.”






In the next study the researchers stated they suspected the vitamin B12 deficiency in MS may be due to problems with binding and/or transport. In addition, the researchers concluded that further studies of vitamin B12 metabolism, binding, and transport in MS are indicated, as they feel this may offer clues to the understanding of MS.

Multiple sclerosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency.
Reynolds EH, Linnell JC, Faludy JE. 1991. Arch Neurol. 48(8):808-11.

“…A vitamin B12 binding and/or transport is suspected. The nature of the association of multiple sclerosis and vitamin B12 deficiency is unclear but is likely to be more than coincidental. Further studies of vitamin B12 metabolism, binding, and transport in multiple sclerosis are indicated, as these cases may offer a clue to the understanding of a still mysterious neurologic disorder.”







In the following study researchers also found that MS patients have a decrease in the binding capacity of vitamin B12, thus inhibiting the transport of vitamin B12 into the cells, even with normal levels in their blood.


Vitamin B12 metabolism and massive-dose methyl vitamin B12 therapy in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis.
Kira J, Tobimatsu S, Goto I. 1994. Intern Med. 33(2):82-6.

“Serum vitamin B12 levels and unsaturated vitamin B12 binding capacities were measured in 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 73 patients with other neurological disorders and 21 healthy subjects. There was no decrease in the vitamin B12 levels, however, a significant decrease in the unsaturated vitamin B12 binding capacities was observed in patients with MS when compared with other groups…”





In the next study the researchers concluded their results suggested a “specific association” between the timing of onset of the first neurological symptoms of MS and vitamin B12 metabolism. The researchers also discussed the importance of vitamin B12 in the formation of myelin and stated that its deficiency in MS is of “critical pathogenetic significance.”

Vitamin B12 and its relationship to age of onset of multiple sclerosis.
Sandyk R, Awerbuch GI. 1993. Int J Neurosci. 71(1-4):93-9.

“these findings suggest a specific association between the timing of onset of first neurological symptoms of MS and vitamin B12 metabolism. In addition, since vitamin B12 is required for the formation of myelin and for immune mechanisms, we propose that its deficiency in MS is of critical pathogenetic significance.”

You could think of this like a break in a water pipe. You need to repair the pipe, not keep turning on the water valve. This just sends water where it shouldn't go.
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Re: S1PR2...does anyone know what this means?

Postby cheerleader » Mon May 12, 2014 3:40 pm

Annesse wrote:Hi Ann,

I would not recommend you supplement with vitamin B12. Research shows that patients with MS are unable to properly metabolize the vitamin. Adding supplemental vitamin B12 to your bloodstream will not correct this. It may however greatly increase your risk of cancer. Cancer cells put out extra receptors to vitamin B12 because it helps them divide. Drug companies know this and are actually using supplemental vitamin B12 as the vehicle to deliver cytotoxic agents to cancer cells. Here is one study on this. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18540842


Whoa...association does NOT mean causation, Annesse.

....researchers theorize it’s more likely cancer causes high levels of B12 than B12 causing cancer.
http://www.everydayhealth.com/cancer/st ... -risk.aspx

In fact, low B12 levels are an MS differential.
Vitamin B12 deficiency has a negative impact on myelin, which is important for neurological function and is a particular target in MS. In fact, B12 deficiency can actually look like MS in some patients, and having low B12 if you have MS can further compromise the brain and spine. That said, healthy people who are eating a regular diet are rarely deficient in B12, and if you have normal levels, taking additional B12 has no proven value. People who are on some extreme diets or don’t eat red meat are more likely to have low levels and should be treated if that’s the case.

http://www.msconnection.org/Blog/June-2 ... r-Brenda-B

Low vitamin B12 creates high levels of homocysteine in the blood (a sulfur containing amino acid) which damages the endothelium. An unbalanced diet, a strict vegetarian diet that excludes all meat, fish, dairy and eggs diet, or a diet overly reliant on processed foods, could all lead to low vitamin B12 levels, potentially damaging the endothelium20.

http://www.ccsvi.org/index.php/helping- ... ial-health

Ann---Talk to your doctor or nurse practitioner about any supplements you take. Make sure you get your blood levels testing for vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Be careful of advice you get on the internet (and I include my advice in this comment!!!!)

Lifestyle changes like exercise, whole food nutrition, and smoking cessation can help your health and heal your endothelium. But you should always work with your health care team. And if the language gets too confusing, and you're told to buy an e-book....walk the other way.
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: S1PR2...does anyone know what this means?

Postby Annesse » Mon May 12, 2014 3:49 pm

Following is some research I posted on the thread concerning the association between vitamin B12 and an increased risk of cancer.

"The absorption of vitamin B12 is an amazingly complex process. A recent study from Norway may be an indication that it might be best if we don’t interfere with this process by taking vitamin B12 supplements.


In the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the researchers found that supplementation with vitamin B12 and folic acid increased the risk of being diagnosed with cancer, of dying from cancer, and of dying from any cause.

Here are the numbers:

The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial in which nearly 7,000 adults in Norway were randomly selected to take one of the following:

•0.8 mg of folic acid + 0.4 mg of vitamin B12 + 40 mg vitamin B6 per day
•0.8 mg of folic acid + 0.4 mg of vitamin B12 per day
•40 mg vitamin B6 per day
•placebo (no vitamins)

Double-blind means that neither the researchers nor the study participants knew who was taking which vitamins or the placebo. Randomized means that people were selected at random for each vitamin (or placebo) group. This type of study is considered "the gold standard" of research designs, because it is most likely to show results accurately, without errors that can happen with other study designs.

Study participants were followed for a median (similar to average) of approximately six and a half years (39 months of active study participation plus 38 months of post-study observation). The study showed that compared with people not receiving folic acid and vitamin B12, those who took these vitamins had:

•21% higher risk of being diagnosed with cancer (any type)
•38% higher risk of dying of cancer (any type)
•18% higher risk of dying of any cause
Taking vitamin B6 did not have any measurable effects (good or bad) on the health of the study participants.
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Re: S1PR2...does anyone know what this means?

Postby MSandI » Mon May 12, 2014 4:16 pm

Hi Annesse and Cheer
I like to learn to see all perspectives of everyone's thoughts and ideas. When I see and or think I might want to try something different than my regular routine, I will always discuss it with my health care team. You are all very kind for sharing your point of view, and I really appreciate that about this forum.
Thank you for sharing
Ann
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