change in dental amalgams

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change in dental amalgams

Postby want2bike » Sat May 31, 2014 9:02 am

The video from Dr. Huggins talks about an event which occurred in 1976 which changes the rate of MS cases but he never explained the event. The composition of the amalgam was changed in 1976 which released more mercury from the amalgams. Found an excellent article by Lawrence Wilson which explains how to take care of your teeth.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmYFDkIa6kw


http://ratherbehealthy.com/?p=270

http://drlwilson.com/articles/dentistry.htm
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby Kronk » Sat May 31, 2014 4:06 pm

Once again this is the "Dr Huggins" who had his license revoked back in 2006, and who agreed not to use the DDS qualification.
http://www.casewatch.org/board/dent/huggins/alj.pdf
Charged with gross negligence, diagnosing (cancerous) tumours that did not exist and charging obscene prices to "treat" them and then trying to shift responsibility onto his employees.

The whole amalgam issue is a joke. Amalgam is silver, tin, copper, zinc and a bit of mercury. When mixed, these elements bond to form a strong, stable substance. Water is hydrogen and oxygen both explosive gases. Saying that amalgam will poison you is just as wrong as saying that drinking water will make you explode and burst into flames.

http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRel ... rcury.html

I do agree that dental health is important. But don't fret over a few silvers in your mouth. You will be exposed to more mercury breathing fresh country air, eating fish and drinking organic tea.
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby jimmylegs » Sat May 31, 2014 7:03 pm

a couple decades of scientific perspectives and findings:

Adverse immunological effects and autoimmunity induced by dental amalgam and alloy in mice.
http://www.fasebj.org/content/8/14/1183.short
"Dental amalgam fillings are the most important source of mercury exposure in the general population, but their potential to cause systemic health consequences is disputed. In this study, inbred mice genetically susceptible to mercury-induced immune aberrations were used to examine whether dental amalgam may interfere with the immune system and cause autoimmunity."
hehe not sure about the external validity there...

The role of mercury and cadmium heavy metals in vascular disease, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17405690
"Mercury, cadmium, and other heavy metals have a high affinity for sulfhydryl (-SH) groups, inactivating numerous enzymatic reactions, amino acids, and sulfur-containing antioxidants (NAC, ALA, GSH), with subsequent decreased oxidant defense and increased oxidative stress. Both bind to metallothionein and substitute for zinc, copper, and other trace metals reducing the effectiveness of metalloenzymes. Mercury induces mitochondrial dysfunction with reduction in ATP, depletion of glutathione, and increased lipid peroxidation; increased oxidative stress is common. Selenium antagonizes mercury toxicity. The overall vascular effects of mercury include oxidative stress, inflammation, thrombosis, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, immune dysfunction, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The clinical consequences of mercury toxicity include hypertension, CHD, MI, increased carotid IMT and obstruction, CVA, generalized atherosclerosis, and renal dysfunction with proteinuria. Pathological, biochemical, and functional medicine correlations are significant and logical. Mercury diminishes the protective effect of fish and omega-3 fatty acids. Mercury, cadmium, and other heavy metals inactivate COMT, which increases serum and urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine. This effect will increase blood pressure and may be a clinical clue to heavy metal toxicity. Cadmium concentrates in the kidney, particularly inducing proteinuria and renal dysfunction; it is associated with hypertension, but less so with CHD. Renal cadmium reduces CYP4A11 and PPARs, which may be related to hypertension, sodium retention, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and zinc deficiency. Dietary calcium may mitigate some of the toxicity of cadmium. Heavy metal toxicity, especially mercury and cadmium, should be evaluated in any patient with hypertension, CHD, or other vascular disease. Specific testing for acute and chronic toxicity and total body burden using hair, toenail, urine, serum, etc. with baseline and provoked evaluation should be done."

Mercury exposure from "silver" tooth fillings: emerging evidence questions a traditional dental paradigm
http://www.fasebj.org/content/9/7/504.short
"For more than 160 years dentistry has used silver amalgam, which contains approximately 50% Hg metal, as the preferred tooth filling material. During the past decade medical research has demonstrated that this Hg is continuously released as vapor into mouth air; then it is inhaled, absorbed into body tissues, oxidized to ionic Hg, and finally covalently bound to cell proteins. Animal and human experiments demonstrate that the uptake, tissue distribution, and excretion of amalgam Hg is significant, and that dental amalgam is the major contributing source to Hg body burden in humans. Current research on the pathophysiological effects of amalgam Hg has focused upon the immune system, renal system, oral and intestinal bacteria, reproductive system, and the central nervous system. Research evidence does not support the notion of amalgam safety."

Amalgam studies: Disregarding basic principles of mercury toxicity
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 3904703028
"Dental amalgam, which has been used for over 150 years in dental practice, consists of about 50% metallic mercury. Studies on animal and humans show that mercury is continuously released from dental amalgam and absorbed by several body tissues. It is widely accepted that the main source of mercury vapor is dental amalgam and it contributes substantially to mercury load in human body tissues. There is still a controversy about the consequences of this additional mercury exposure from amalgam to human health. Many studies were performed to evaluate possible adverse effects. In this comment, these studies were analyzed with regard to their methodical quality by considering the newest findings on mercury toxicity and metabolism. In sum, a number of studies are methodically flawed drawing inaccurate conclusions as to the safety of dental amalgam."

Mercury amalgam dental fillings: An epidemiologic assessment
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 3906000034
"Dental amalgam fillings containing approximately 50% mercury have been used for almost 200 years and have been controversial for almost the same time. Allegations of effects caused by amalgams have involved many diseases. Recent evidence that small amounts of mercury are continuously released from amalgam fillings has fuelled the controversy. This is a comprehensive review of the epidemiologic evidence for the safety of dental amalgam fillings, with an emphasis on methodological issues and identifying gaps in the literature. Studies show little evidence of effects on general chronic disease incidence or mortality. Limited evidence exists for an association with multiple sclerosis, but few studies on either Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases. The preponderance of evidence suggests no renal effects and that ill-defined symptom complexes, including chronic fatigue syndrome, are not caused by amalgams. There is little direct evidence that can be used to assess reproductive hazards. Overall, few relevant epidemiologic studies are available. Most prior assessments of possible amalgam health effects have been based on comparisons of dental mercury exposures with occupational exposures causing harm. However, the amalgam-exposed population contains a broader, possibly more susceptible, spectrum of people. Common limitations of population-based studies of dental amalgam effects include inadequate longitudinal exposure assessment and negative confounding by better access to dental care in higher socioeconomic groups. Better designed studies are needed, particularly for investigation of neurodegenerative diseases and effects on infants and children."

Nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and mercury exposure among children with and without dental amalgam fillings
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 3908000801
"A scientific review panel for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently identified the need for more data on the health risk of mercury exposure from dental amalgam among susceptible populations. We evaluated impacts of low-level mercury exposure on renal function and neurobehavioral and neuropsychological performance among children.
Dental histories for 403 children aged 7–11 years in five schools from Xuhui, Shanghai were checked by dentists. Of them, 198 with confirmed amalgam fillings were recruited (exposure group). Reference children (N=205) were those who never had dental amalgam treatment. In May 2004, each child provided a urine sample for measurements of total mercury, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase activity, microalbumin, and creatinine (Cr). The Child Behavior Checklist, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and an intelligence screening test were administered.
The geometric mean urinary mercury concentration was 1.6 μg/g Cr for children with and 1.4 μg/g Cr for children without amalgam fillings. No differences were found between children with and without fillings for either renal function biomarker, or on neurobehavioral, neuropsychological, or intelligence tests.
Although urinary mercury concentration was slightly elevated among children with amalgam fillings, we found no evidence of adverse effects on the outcomes evaluated. These results agree with those from recent trials in developed countries."

Mercury exposure and risks from dental amalgam in the US population, post-2000
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 9711006607
"Dental amalgam is 50% metallic mercury (Hg) by weight and Hg vapour continuously evolves from in-place dental amalgam, causing increased Hg content with increasing amalgam load in urine, faeces, exhaled breath, saliva, blood, and various organs and tissues including the kidney, pituitary gland, liver, and brain. The Hg content also increases with maternal amalgam load in amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, meconium, various foetal tissues including liver, kidney and brain, in colostrum and breast milk.
Based on 2001 to 2004 population statistics, 181.1 million Americans carry a grand total of 1.46 billion restored teeth. Children as young as 26 months were recorded as having restored teeth. Past dental practice and recently available data indicate that the majority of these restorations are composed of dental amalgam.
Employing recent US population-based statistics on body weight and the frequency of dentally restored tooth surfaces, and recent research on the incremental increase in urinary Hg concentration per amalgam-filled tooth surface, estimates of Hg exposure from amalgam fillings were determined for 5 age groups of the US population.
Three specific exposure scenarios were considered, each scenario incrementally reducing the number of tooth surfaces assumed to be restored with amalgam. Based on the least conservative of the scenarios evaluated, it was estimated that some 67.2 million Americans would exceed the Hg dose associated with the reference exposure level (REL) of 0.3 μg/m3 established by the US Environmental Protection Agency; and 122.3 million Americans would exceed the dose associated with the REL of 0.03 μg/m3 established by the California Environmental Protection Agency.
Exposure estimates are consistent with previous estimates presented by Health Canada in 1995, and amount to 0.2 to 0.4 μg/day per amalgam-filled tooth surface, or 0.5 to 1 μg/day/amalgam-filled tooth, depending on age and other factors."

Mercury (Hg) burden in children: The impact of dental amalgam
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 9711004359
"The risks and benefits of using mercury (Hg) in dental amalgam have long been debated. This study was designed to estimate Hg body burden and its association with dental amalgam fillings in 182 children (ages: 5–15 years) living in Taif City. Hg was measured in urine (UHg), hair (HHg) and toenails (NHg) by the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Vapor Generator Accessory system. Urinary Hg levels were calculated as both micrograms per gram creatinine (μg/g creatinine) and micrograms per liter (μg/L). We found that children with amalgam fillings (N = 106) had significantly higher UHg-C levels than children without (N = 76), with means of 3.763 μg/g creatinine versus 3.457 μg/g creatinine, respectively (P = 0.019). The results were similar for UHg (P = 0.01). A similar pattern was also seen for HHg, with means of 0.614 μg/g (N = 97) for children with amalgam versus 0.242 μg/g (N = 74) for those without amalgam fillings (P = 0). Although the mean NHg was higher in children without amalgam (0.222 μg/g, N = 61) versus those with (0.163 μg/g, N = 101), the relationship was not significant (P = 0.069). After adjusting for many confounders, the multiple logistic regression model revealed that the levels of UHg-C and HHg were 2.047 and 5.396 times higher, respectively, in children with dental amalgam compared to those without (P < 0.01). In contrast, a significant inverse relationship was seen between NHg levels and dental amalgam fillings (P = 0.003). Despite the controversy surrounding the health impact of dental amalgam, this study showed some evidence that amalgam-associated Hg exposure might be related with symptoms of oral health, such as aphthous ulcer, white patches, and a burning-mouth sensation. Further studies are needed to reproduce these findings. The present study showed that significant numbers of children with or without amalgam had Hg levels exceeding the acceptable reference limits. The detrimental neurobehavioral and/or nephrotoxic effects of such an increased Hg on children should be a cause of concern, and further investigation is warranted. Our results are alarming and indicate an urgent need for biomonitoring and assessment of exposure. Changes in dental practices involving amalgam, especially for children, are highly recommended in order to avoid unnecessary exposure to Hg."

Mercury in serum predicts low risk of death and myocardial infarction in Gothenburg women
http://link.springer.com/article/10.100 ... 012-0746-8
"We assessed the association between serum Hg (S–Hg) and risk of cardiovascular disease in a prospective population-based cohort, with attention to the roles of dental health and fish consumption. ... There was a strong inverse association between Hg exposure and CVD. Likely, reasons are confounding with good dental health (also correlated with the number of amalgam fillings in these age groups) and/or fish consumption. The results suggest potential effects of dental health and/or fish consumption on CVD that deserve attention in preventive medicine."

Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 5 years in children exposed prenatally to maternal dental amalgam: The Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 6213001724
We measured prenatal maternal amalgam status as a metric of mercury vapor exposure.
We administered age appropriate neurodevelopmental tests to the children at 5 years.
Prenatal mercury vapor exposure was not associated with any outcome.
We found no evidence that maternal amalgams harm children's neurodevelopment.
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby Kronk » Sun Jun 01, 2014 7:26 am

That's an impressive amount of research Jimmy Thanks!

I am not saying mercury is safe, or that amalgams are the best option to fill a cavity. But amalgams are not the primary culprit for increasing Hg in the human body. Focus on the things that matter if you are concerned. Salmon, Tuna and pretty much any other ocean fish will have much more Hg than an amalgam will leak over a lifetime. We must continue our environmental protection efforts to isolate mercury.

Original poster would have you fear amalgams, fear dentists, fear doctors, fear everything with little to no fact. All I am saying is avoid them if you choose, but don't be afraid of a dental amalgam you have from years ago. There are more important things to focus your energy on...
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Jun 01, 2014 9:30 am

hi no probs kronk :) i'd be interested to read the science on the seafood contribution, if you have some links. some of the studies above assert that amalgam is widely accepted as the major source of Hg exposure and loading in humans. (i went back and highlighted these). i'll certainly agree, as a fan of science, that in general it's better to back up claims with academic literature - fosters a better tone for the debate :)
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby want2bike » Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:28 pm

This is not science but some people do get their health back when they have amalgams removed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-qhxa-3Wbw
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby Kronk » Mon Jun 02, 2014 8:43 am

I just don't believe the incredibly small doses of mercury that are produced from Amalgams contribute to any kind of poor health. We are talking fractions of micrograms, and the study below states of those fractions an even smaller fraction is able to be absorbed by the body. Again Amalgams are not the culprit for mercury toxicity. Dentists do give other options, like the white caps that look better and don't contain the mercury. My concern is by over focusing on this one area you are missing where the real dangers lie.

http://www.ns.umich.edu/new/releases/21 ... ainability)
"...A common test used to determine mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings may significantly overestimate the amount of the toxic metal released from fillings, according to University of Michigan researchers..."

http://nutritionfacts.org/2012/07/27/me ... pregnancy/
"...One response to this debate has been the assertion that one receives more mercury from eating a tuna fish sandwich than from dental amalgam fillings (Greger, 2012). Greger even suggests that a total of 29 amalgam-filled teeth are required to deliver the same mercury dose as eating 1 tuna fish sandwich per week..."
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jun 02, 2014 8:48 am

luckily dental amalgams are not my focus (if i was dealing with someone with lots of fillings i'd be more worried about their nutrient status and how their dental health got that bad in the first place - not to mention deficient functionality of mercury handling pathways).
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby cheerleader » Mon Jun 02, 2014 9:13 am

Mercury is one of many known environmental endothelial disrupters. Small amounts may contribute to endothelial dysfunction and failure of the tight junctions of the blood brain barrier. Heavy metals, such as mercury and cadmium, change the lining of our blood vessels.
Low mercury concentrations cause oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction
http://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/ ... 3.full.pdf
Cadmium and mercury cause an oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction
http://link.springer.com/article/10.100 ... 6-0#page-1

But there is not just one cause of endothelial dysfunction. Mercury is only one contributor. Other environmental factors which can contribute to oxidative stress are plastics (especially BPA), cigarette smoke, and air pollution. The problem is that modern man is exposed to many more endothelial disrupters in everyday life, and the effect is cumulative. But there are things we can do.
For more info:
http://www.ccsvi.org/index.php/helping- ... ial-health
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jun 02, 2014 9:40 am

AND endothelial dysfunction too :) hi cheer
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby lyndacarol » Mon Jun 02, 2014 10:11 am

cheerleader wrote:Heavy metals, such as mercury and cadmium, change the lining of our blood vessels.

I am just curious and have a question: I understand that gadolinium, the substance injected into our bloodstreams as a contrast agent in our MRIs, is a heavy metal. Would this affect the lining of the blood vessels in the same manner as mercury and cadmium?
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby jimmylegs » Mon Jun 02, 2014 10:20 am

something:

Toxic effects of mercury, lead and gadolinium on vascular reactivity
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S01 ... xt&tlng=pt

Heavy metals have been used in a wide variety of human activities that have significantly increased both professional and environmental exposure. Unfortunately, disasters have highlighted the toxic effects of metals on different organs and systems. Over the last 50 years, the adverse effects of chronic lead, mercury and gadolinium exposure have been underscored. Mercury and lead induce hypertension in humans and animals, affecting endothelial function in addition to their other effects. Increased cardiovascular risk after exposure to metals has been reported, but the underlying mechanisms, mainly for short periods of time and at low concentrations, have not been well explored. The presence of other metals such as gadolinium has raised concerns about contrast-induced nephropathy and, interestingly, despite this negative action, gadolinium has not been defined as a toxic agent. The main actions of these metals, demonstrated in animal and human studies, are an increase of free radical production and oxidative stress and stimulation of angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity, among others. Increased vascular reactivity, highlighted in the present review, resulting from these actions might be an important mechanism underlying increased cardiovascular risk. Finally, the results described in this review suggest that mercury, lead and gadolinium, even at low doses or concentrations, affect vascular reactivity. Acting via the endothelium, by continuous exposure followed by their absorption, they can increase the production of free radicals and of angiotensin II, representing a hazard for cardiovascular function. In addition, the actual reference values, considered to pose no risk, need to be reduced.
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby want2bike » Wed Jun 04, 2014 10:37 am

Most of the studies concerning mercury are done over seas. The FDA does not want to know about the hazards of mercury in the amalgams. Bernard Windham has an excellent paper with studies concerning the hazardous of mercury.

http://www.thenaturalrecoveryplan.com/a ... -Safe.html

http://www.cfspages.com/bernie.html
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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby DrGeoff » Thu Jun 05, 2014 8:30 am

A post above cites an item on the Natural Recovery Plan:
http://www.thenaturalrecoveryplan.com/a ... -Safe.html
which is in turn based on a supposedly scientific paper from Germany.

What a pity that the original paper and the short story developed from it both contain what may be a serious flaw:
they both say that Mercury is a gas at room temperature.

Most basic textbooks will say that Mercury does not boil until the temperature exceeds 300 degrees C (atmospheric pressure can make a tiny difference).
Must be a very hot room!

If there is one blunder like this - how many others are there? From this, can you trust a single word?

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Re: change in dental amalgams

Postby HarryZ » Thu Jun 05, 2014 8:55 am

want2bike wrote: The FDA does not want to know about the hazards of mercury in the amalgams.


Notwithstanding Dr. Geoff's information about the serious flaw on the study that you quoted, Health Canada has pretty much the same reaction to amalgam fillings as does the FDA. Does that mean that Health Canada as well does not want to know about the hazards of amalgams? If so, do we now have beginning of a world wide conspiracy?

While for certain people amalgam fillings may be a problem, one cannot generalize and say they are dangerous for everyone. Peanut butter, fish and certain fruits can be deadly for some people but we don't ban them!

People have a choice but let's not use fear to try and influence them.
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