Laser eye surgery

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.

Postby EyeDoc » Tue May 29, 2007 7:43 am

I had lasik 2 years ago. Having already had optic neuritis in one of my eyes, I strongly considered any possible problems the surgery may cause. I spoke with my ophthalmologist buddy that did the surgery several times about any potential problems. The only thing we could come up with is the fact that during Lasik, when the blade cuts the corneal flap (mostly done with a laser nowadays) a good deal of pressure is placed on the eye. Our concern was that this pressure, as shortlived as it is, could further injure an already compromised optic nerve. We thoroughly researched this in the literature and could find no known cases of this causing further damage. So I had the surgery and everything is fine.
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Postby SarahLonglands » Tue May 29, 2007 8:59 am

EyeDoc and Smilingface, perhaps you could both tell me one thing - is Lasik a one-off operation or will it likely need redoing, in the way that people who wear glasses or contacts periodically need a new prescription? I am a complete novice here because there is nothing wrong with my eyes, but I see friends of all ages periodically needing to get ever stronger lenses.

Sarah :?
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Postby EyeDoc » Tue May 29, 2007 12:10 pm

Anecdote wrote:EyeDoc and Smilingface, perhaps you could both tell me one thing - is Lasik a one-off operation or will it likely need redoing, in the way that people who wear glasses or contacts periodically need a new prescription? I am a complete novice here because there is nothing wrong with my eyes, but I see friends of all ages periodically needing to get ever stronger lenses.

Sarah :?


The short answer is: yes, it is permanent.

There are a few caveats, though. Briefly, the main reason we recommend people wait until they are 18-21 years of age before having Lasik is due to the fact that our eyes change with growth. If a 16 year old is nearsighted, he or she will likely continue to get more nearsighted as the eye lengthens with growth. This is why we see people need stronger glasses as they age. For the most part, our eyes do not change much at all after age 21-25 until we reach our 40s. This is when everyone's eyes (including those with perfect eyesight, Sarah!) begin having trouble with up close focus. Lasik does not affect nor correct this.

Of course, there are many factors to consider in discussing Lasik and vision change, but I have probably already bored you enough!
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Postby Minai » Tue May 29, 2007 1:55 pm

Wow, Eyedoc!

Thanks for such great info. This helps, as my husband and I are both 40+ (I'm the one with MS). Just picked up my new, very pricey pair of no-line bifocals, a few days, ago. Not brave enough to try bi-focal contacts, yet, though.

So, no comments from either you nor from Dr. SmileyFace about the risk of MRSA infection? Maybe a higher risk depending on where LASIK is performed?

My husband, an Army officer, would have had to have it done at a very large military facility. Had been thinking of e-mailing someone high up at the DOD to inquire about the risks... I would think the risks, there, would be much higher than having it done in civilian private practices. Between infection and the info that you have just provided; am just glad that my husband has reconsidered LASIK.
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Postby Muu » Tue May 29, 2007 2:30 pm

Ian
My hubby, a non mser, had laser surgery when it was in it's infancy, and, apart from having to be extra careful during the recovery period, never looked back. This must have been 20 or so years ago and no doubt recovery times etc have changed. May be worth looking into after care esp if your kids like to dive bomb daddy or if you're on crowded transport where you might get a knock.
Muu
Ps My recollection is that you looked v dashing in your specs!
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Postby EyeDoc » Wed May 30, 2007 2:06 pm

Minai wrote:Wow, Eyedoc!

Thanks for such great info. This helps, as my husband and I are both 40+ (I'm the one with MS). Just picked up my new, very pricey pair of no-line bifocals, a few days, ago. Not brave enough to try bi-focal contacts, yet, though.

So, no comments from either you nor from Dr. SmileyFace about the risk of MRSA infection? Maybe a higher risk depending on where LASIK is performed?

My husband, an Army officer, would have had to have it done at a very large military facility. Had been thinking of e-mailing someone high up at the DOD to inquire about the risks... I would think the risks, there, would be much higher than having it done in civilian private practices. Between infection and the info that you have just provided; am just glad that my husband has reconsidered LASIK.


Certainly, MRSA infections are a huge problem for any discipline of healthcare, be it in a hospital or for an outpatient surgery like Lasik. I am personally not aware of a higher incidence of MRSA infections with Lasik, per se. I do know that MRSA infection rates are more likely in a hospital setting, and that being said, I would assume that your chance of catching a rare infection like that would be higher there.

I have been involved in about 1,000 Lasik patients' care, and I have yet to see a serious eye infection, much less MRSA. ***knock on wood***
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Postby Baumer » Wed May 30, 2007 2:27 pm

I was dx'd with MS in Oct 04. I recently had LASIK done on both eyes (February). I still have a little bit of haloing in my right eye when watching movies in the dark. Other than that, I am very pleased with the results. It is nice not to have to worry about falling asleep with my contacts in, or having to worry about carrying solution and cleaners when I travel on an airplane.

The only thing my doctor said about having MS was that if I had any damage from an ON episode that affected the vision, LASIK would do nothing for that. He mentioned that if someone had damage from ON in an eye, he wouldn't recommend having LASIK because of the chance of something happening to the good eye. Even though he wouldn't recommend it, if someone really wanted it, he would do it as long as they had a good understanding of the risk.

Hope this helps,
Aaron
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Postby SarahLonglands » Thu May 31, 2007 3:15 am

For the most part, our eyes do not change much at all after age 21-25 until we reach our 40s. This is when everyone's eyes (including those with perfect eyesight, Sarah!) begin having trouble with up close focus. Lasik does not affect nor correct this.

That's alright, then: I'm 49 and I don't have trouble with close up focus, so I guess I'm just odd.

Sarah :wink:
An Itinerary in Light and Shadow Completed Dr Charles Stratton / Dr David Wheldon abx regime for aggressive secondary progressive MS in June 2007, after four years. Still improving with no relapses since starting. Can't run but can paint all day.
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Postby Minai » Thu May 31, 2007 11:21 am

EyeDoc wrote:Certainly, MRSA infections are a huge problem for any discipline of healthcare, be it in a hospital or for an outpatient surgery like Lasik. I am personally not aware of a higher incidence of MRSA infections with Lasik, per se. I do know that MRSA infection rates are more likely in a hospital setting, and that being said, I would assume that your chance of catching a rare infection like that would be higher there.

I have been involved in about 1,000 Lasik patients' care, and I have yet to see a serious eye infection, much less MRSA. ***knock on wood***


EyeDoc: Thanks for commenting on MRSA infection rates. Am just hoping it never will reach epidemic proportions, re: LASIK, as that American Journal of Opthalmology article is predicting it might. Yes, "knock on wood" that one does not become one of the few unfortunate. :(
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