increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

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increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby ElliotB » Mon Feb 09, 2015 4:10 pm

Some say CCSVI works. Others not. Many who have the surgery seem to have some initial benefit which only last a few years. Others don't have any benefit. And of course, some have long lasting positive results.

In any case, I think that most will agree that increasing blood flow to the brain is probably a good thing (whether you are sick with MS or not). I personally would not choose the surgery option unless it was an option of last resort. I am not at that point at this time, fortunately. I have done research in the past on this topic and feel that through exercise and other techniques I have followed for quite some time, I have perhaps achieved this goal without surgery. I have no way of knowing for sure but my brain has never in my life worked as well as it does now. I found this article which covers many of the techniques I use:


http://www.wikihow.com/Increase-Blood-Flow-to-the-Brain


There are many other similar articles on the web. These techniques are certainly worth adapting in my opinion.
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby CureOrBust » Tue Feb 10, 2015 1:45 am

The aim of CCSVI surgery is not directly aimed at increasing the blood flow to the brain, but is all about removing restrictions from the outflow from the brain.
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby 1eye » Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:25 am

All these things are usually good, unless blood vessel walls in the brain leak. If you do all these things, it may help. But see frodo's posting in the CCSVI forum...

It takes only about one second without blood flow to cause brain damage!


Fortunately, it takes years to poison the brain with stray blood most of the time.

Anyway, for most, it's not surgery, it's a 1-hour procedure with no general anesthetic.
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby ElliotB » Tue Feb 10, 2015 3:28 am

As blood flow to the brain increases, so does blood flow throughout the body. It should be effective in both directions, and thus increase blood flow away from the brain, which is the goal of CCVSI. And by increasing blood flow away from the brain, the ultimate goal of CCVSI, are you not at the same time increasing blood flow to the brain? Again, I am not a doctor or scientist, but I strongly believe the increase in blood flow and thus the increase in oxygen is beneficial, especially to the brain and of course throughout the rest of the body. It only makes sense to feed the brain and the rest of the body what it needs. The brain is, after all the most important organ in the body. The brain uses 20% of available oxygen for normal functions. And by increasing blood flow to the brain, it only makes sense that outflow would be increased also. Which is the goal of the CCVSI procedure.

The CCVSI surgical procedure is unfortunately not without risks. Increasing blood flow 'naturally' has no risks and brings with it the possibility of numerous health benefits. Which I believe I am reaping. My brain is 'on' and my body is following suit. I don't know what tomorrow will bring me but for today, I am doing fantastic. And I strongly believe the increasing blood flow and oxygen within the body is playing an important role. (I also do oxygen treatment daily in addition to lots of exercise and of course a very limited/strict 'controversial' diet.)
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby vesta » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:36 am

ElliotB: You are absolutely right, whatever enhances cerebrospinal fluid and blood circulation throughout the central nervous system will prevent the blood "reflux" and bring oxygen and nutrients to the brain. Below I re-post my 5 steps to MS health. But consult also Matt Embry's video. He had CCSVI and the vein remained open for 3 months only to close up again, now he uses exercise to keep fluids circulating. This accords with my thinking that the "stenosis" may not be rigid, that one can get fluids flowing through exercise, massage, any number of techniques. (For me swimming and an exercise bike works best.) UNLESS there is a structural obstruction like a bone.

http://www.mshope.com (Matt Embry's video)

THE FIVE STEPS TO MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS HEALTH

1. DETOXIFY
“Dr. Hyman explains his 10 day detox diet. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgcGlei_JLo
want2bike (From Thisisms.com)
I had the advice/assistance of a kinesiologist/nutritionist and won’t myself suggest a detox protocol. Dr. Hyman maintains that a simple diet change over 10 days will do the trick (or at least be a beginning) which is something anyone can try. So why not?
See also Detoxification and Supplements

2. OPTIMAL NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTS - Paleo-Macrobiotic Diet

3. ENHANCE BLOOD/CEREBROSPINAL FLUID CIRCULATION - CCSVI - See Acupuncture (which includes Tens Self Acupressure)
Simple blood/cerebrospinal fluid circulation thérapies such massage, acupuncture, neuro-muscular electrical stimulation, osteopathy, or swimming may suffice. I do daily Tens self acupressure treatments to stay afloat and try to get an acupuncture or osteopathic treatment once a month. A serious venous blockage may require ANGIOPLASTY. Prior to taking that decision, one might consult a specialist in skeletal disorders (e.g. Chiropractors or Osteopaths) to be certain a bone, muscle, artery etc is not obstructing the vein.

4. SUNLIGHT OR UV RAYS on the skin at least 15 minutes daily to release Nitric Oxide essential to vascular health and blood circulation.

5. EXERCISE BUILD UP PROGRESSIVELY (Consulting a Physical Therapist can help)

Previously published on my site MS Cure Enigmas.net

http://www.mscureenigmas.net/
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby cheerleader » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:24 pm

I created the Endothelial Health program for my dear husband in '08. He's been following the program since then. I reached out and shared my research in MS with an endothelial specialist at Stanford, which is how this all began.
http://ccsvi.org/index.php/helping-myse ... ial-health

My husband had his severely stenotic dural sinus and jugular repaired in '09. Not surgery, it's called endovascular repair. His treatment was an FDA approved treatment for dural sinus stenosis, and covered by insurance. It was done with a local doctor--not tourism, and he has had ongoing follow up.

This month is the 8 year anniversary of his MS diagnosis, and he's still jogging, skiing, working full days at 51. He's in better shape than most "healthy" guys his age.
Cerebral perfusion is important. Hypoperfusion is present in all diseases of neurodegeneration, and there are lifestyle adjustments that can help. But if you have a severe venous malformation which is imparing outflow of CSF and blood--endovascular repair may be necessary. Hope it can help others!
cheer
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby CureOrBust » Wed Feb 11, 2015 4:53 am

ElliotB wrote:In any case, I think that most will agree that increasing blood flow to the brain is probably a good thing (whether you are sick with MS or not).

ElliotB wrote:As blood flow to the brain increases, so does blood flow throughout the body. It should be effective in both directions, and thus increase blood flow away from the brain, which is the goal of CCVSI. And by increasing blood flow away from the brain, the ultimate goal of CCVSI, are you not at the same time increasing blood flow to the brain?

vesta wrote:ElliotB: You are absolutely right, whatever enhances cerebrospinal fluid and blood circulation throughout the central nervous system will prevent the blood "reflux" and bring oxygen and nutrients to the brain.

No. The actual physics of the issue disagree.

If you have a physical issue (as most CCSVI doctors will talk of finding in MS patients) increasing the flow in without correcting the outflow path, may actually worsen the non-laminar flow and reflux; increased yes, but not "better". Think of a hose with your fingers pinching the outlet. The more you turn the tap up, the more the outflow becomes turbulent. I remember when this all started, there was a belief that the non laminar flow caused the permeability in the vessels ie the BBB.
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby ElliotB » Wed Feb 11, 2015 5:29 am

"Think of a hose with your fingers pinching the outlet. The more you turn the tap up, the more the outflow becomes turbulent."

Good point, and while true for a hose, I suspect the example does not hold true for the brain as there are numerous entrance and exit paths. And while a hose is not flexible, veins are. I certainly don't know for sure. I am not a doctor and know little about how the body works. But I sure know how it doesn't work! You may be right. I hope I am right. All I know is my various strategies seem to be working for me, but I also know that it is possible I would be doing as well as I am by doing nothing and the disease may just be going into remission on its own. I don't know if my veins are restricted or not and don't have any plans to have them checked or have the procedure done.
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby vesta » Wed Feb 11, 2015 8:24 am

If you have a physical issue (as most CCSVI doctors will talk of finding in MS patients) increasing the flow in without correcting the outflow path, may actually worsen the non-laminar flow and reflux; increased yes, but not "better". Think of a hose with your fingers pinching the outlet. The more you turn the tap up, the more the outflow becomes turbulent. I remember when this all started, there was a belief that the non laminar flow caused the permeability in the vessels ie the BBB.


My point is that the stenosis is not always rigid and can be opened with massage, or exercise (swimming for instance). The only time that wouldn't be true is if the stenosis is caused by a hard physical obstruction like a bone.
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby cheerleader » Wed Feb 11, 2015 8:47 am

CureOrBust wrote: I remember when this all started, there was a belief that the non laminar flow caused the permeability in the vessels ie the BBB.


That's still the case, Cure. In fact, we have even more research to back this up now. Lack of laminar flow (called turbulant flow) and lack of shear stress (which we see in CCSVI) creates endothelial dysfunction and permeability of blood vessels--throughout the body. Dr. Cooke and other researchers are continuing to publish on this. Hemodynamic alterations change the veins, creating inflammation and aptosis of endothelial cells. Dr. Zamboni has found damaged jugular valves and veins that no longer have endothelial cells in pwMS/CCSVI.
chronic-cerebrospinal-venous-insufficiency-ccsvi-f40/topic24992.html
here's more:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3844671/

In the venous system, changes in hemodynamic forces in the vein wall, including shear stress and pressure, may induce inflammation and the subsequent remodeling of the wall and venous valves, which are the fundamental mechanisms underlying various venous pathologies, including telangiectasias, reticular veins, and varicose veins (424, 446, 448). Study of surgical specimens and direct observation by angioscopy have revealed that the wall and valves of varicose veins undergo profound morphological changes, with thickening in some segments of the wall and thinning in others, dilation of the valve annulus, bulging and stretching of the valvular leaflets, and even complete destruction of the valves (448). These remodeling processes of the vein wall and venous valves involve the complex interplay of a range of factors, including an altered ratio between MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs), and elevated levels of cytokines and growth factors that favor an alteration of the extracellular matrix (ECM) (424). In rodent models of venous thrombosis created by ligation of inferior vena cava to produce venous hypertension and altered shear stress (35), thrombus initiation is associated with a rapid vein wall inflammatory reaction involving early endothelial activation and neutrophil infiltration (35, 157), and later vein wall remodeling associated with increased expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 (35, 141). These results on the venous system, in concert with the observations on the arterial system, suggest that changes in hemodynamic forces play critical roles in the remodeling of blood vessels, including both arteries and veins.
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Re: increasing blood flow to the brain, WITHOUT surgery

Postby vesta » Wed Feb 11, 2015 9:17 am

cheerleader wrote:I created the Endothelial Health program for my dear husband in '08. He's been following the program since then. I reached out and shared my research in MS with an endothelial specialist at Stanford, which is how this all began.
http://ccsvi.org/index.php/helping-myse ... ial-health

My husband had his severely stenotic dural sinus and jugular repaired in '09. Not surgery, it's called endovascular repair. His treatment was an FDA approved treatment for dural sinus stenosis, and covered by insurance. It was done with a local doctor--not tourism, and he has had ongoing follow up.

This month is the 8 year anniversary of his MS diagnosis, and he's still jogging, skiing, working full days at 51. He's in better shape than most "healthy" guys his age.
Cerebral perfusion is important. Hypoperfusion is present in all diseases of neurodegeneration, and there are lifestyle adjustments that can help. But if you have a severe venous malformation which is imparing outflow of CSF and blood--endovascular repair may be necessary. Hope it can help others!
cheer


As I understood, your husband was the first to be treated at Stanford. He was Lucky in the treatment and that he was insured. We all know that the FDA has put obstacles in the way of MSers being treated for CCSVI. Matt Embry himself (you posted his video) underwent angioplasty and the vein remained open for 3 months and then closed again, but he has shown that through exercise he is able to keep the blood/fluids flowing. People should be encouraged to do what they can. Does the PTA success rate ramain the same, one third do very well, one third OK, the final third not at all? Understanding these variations can only validate the CCSVI idea. If I am put in a hospital setting and my veins examined, whatever closes under stress would be closed. But I've learned to keep the flow open through circulation thérapies and am much better as a consequence.
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