BBB Permeability?

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BBB Permeability?

Postby CureOrBust » Wed Jun 28, 2006 3:32 am

Just wanted to gather all your knowledge on BBB Permeability reduction, and what we can do now. For example, with suppliments.

The thing that triggered this line of thought was probably the thread http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-2477.html which had statins reducing BBB permeability.

Now I (think I) know tysabri works by making the stuff too big to pass through the BBB. And when I did a search on this site, i also came accross the article "Interferon-Beta Treatment Improves Blood-Brain Barrier" at http://www.thisisms.com/article141.html and also http://www.thisisms.com/article124.html has
OddDuck wrote:Increasing IL-10 may help to reverse the process of blood/brain permeability

Anything else?
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uric acid and bbb

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Jun 28, 2006 6:00 am

hey there cure, i went looking for nutrition and blood brain barrier on seeing your post and it came back to uric acid. the abstract below is probably posted elsewhere in the forums but since it directly goes to your bbb comment...

can't recall if you read/commented on the earlier uric acid posts where uric acid was mentioned in abstracts as a peroxynitrite scavenger, and that by supplementing with inosine, serum uric acid can be raised more effectively than by direct uric acid supplementation, and there was also an abstract discussing relapse rates after boosting serum uric acid and it looked pretty good - that one was in my post with the all caps VANISHING LESIONS AND HALTED DISEASE PROGRESS or whatever it was. i will be looking to buy some inosine and introduce it into my regimen once i get to oz.

European Journal of Neurology
Volume 9 Page 221 - May 2002
doi:10.1046/j.1468-1331.2002.00384.x
Volume 9 Issue 3

Serum uric acid levels in multiple sclerosis patients correlate with activity of disease and blood–brain barrier dysfunction
G. Tonceva, B. Milicicb, S. Toncevc & G. Samardzicd

Several findings suggest lower levels of serum uric acid in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships of uric acid serum levels in relapse–remitting (RR) MS patients with clinical activity of disease and blood–brain barrier (BBB) condition. Sixty-three definite RRMS patients and 40 controls divided into two groups: 20 healthy donors and 20 patients with other inflammatory neurological diseases (OINDs) were analysed. By using a quantitative enzymatic assay according to the manufacture's protocol and a commercial uric acid standard solution, serum uric acid levels were measured and the results were standardized. To investigate BBB function, magnetic resonance imaging after administration of gadolinium was used. MS patients were found to have significantly lower serum uric acid levels (193.89 ± 49.05 μmol/l; mean value ±SD) in comparison with healthy donors (292.7 ± 58.65 μmol/l; P=0.000) and OIND patients (242.7 ± 46.66 μmol/l; P=0.001). We found that MS patients with relapse had significantly lower serum uric acid levels (161.49 ± 23.61 μmol/l) than MS patients with remission (234.39 ± 41.96 μmol/l; P=0.000) and more over, MS patients with BBB disruption had significantly lower serum uric acid levels (163.95 ± 26.07 μmol/l) than those with normal BBB (252.48 ± 25.94 μmol/l; P=0.000). Further, we also found that serum uric acid level independently correlated with disease activity, BBB disruption, and gender. These results indicate that lower uric acid levels in MS patients are associated with relapse and suggest that uric acid might be beneficial in the treatment of MS.
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I hate it when this happens

Postby notasperfectasyou » Wed Jun 28, 2006 7:39 am

I will be on the look out for stuff on this.

I remember reading an article that talked about b-cell's multiplying in the CNS. That they would migrate to the CNS then multiply there. The thing that's sorta iffy, is that I remember reading an article that noted that there were at least 3 ways for white blood cells to access the CNS. I don't remember much more than that and I have not yet found the articles. I will keep thinking and looking.

As for supplements, you might want to look up Curcumin. napay
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BBB and Estrogen, Progesterone and Magnesium

Postby Shayk » Wed Jun 28, 2006 6:48 pm

Based on rat studies in traumatic brain injury, I definitely think progesterone, estrogen and magnesium could be added to the list.

Magnesium and BBB
The findings of the present study support that beneficial effects of magnesium sulfate exist after severe traumatic brain injury in rats. These results also indicate that a blood-brain barrier permeability defect occurs after this model of diffuse traumatic brain injury, and magnesium seems to attenuate this defect.

There's also "magnesium as a statin" so it may not be any different than than taking a statin vis a vis BBB permeability. Who knows? :roll:

Estrogen and Progesterone Attenuate Edema in TBI
a single physiological dose of either hormone at 30 min after diffuse traumatic brain injury reduces both blood brain barrier permeability and edema formation.

Take care everyone

Sharon
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Postby CureOrBust » Thu Jun 29, 2006 2:40 am

one thing i thought i might mention, with no link to the article, just my memory.

I remember reading an article on treatment of cancer in the brain. Doctors were having trouble with chemo because the BBB would block the chemical from entering the brain. What they found was that they could inject sugar with the chemo drug, and this technique increased the entry of the chemo drug through the BBB. Just a memory, no references.
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things that make ya go hmm

Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jun 29, 2006 5:26 am

sugar! interesting... ve-ry interesting...
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Re: things that make ya go hmm

Postby notasperfectasyou » Thu Jun 29, 2006 7:12 am

jimmylegs wrote:sugar! interesting... ve-ry interesting...


similarly there are some articles out there about vitamin c being blocked and DHA making it in. I think I cited it in the C post in the natural section.
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jun 29, 2006 9:54 am

cool. have to check that out.
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Sugar? Maybe insulin too

Postby lyndacarol » Thu Jun 29, 2006 3:35 pm

If sugar crosses the BBB, maybe insulin too (especially excess). The brain needs glucose; insulin is needed to ferry glucose to cells. Could this account for those Louisiana State researchers proposing that MS might be a vascular disease and damage to cerebral endothelial cells found?[/list]
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Postby verminsquibble » Sat Jul 01, 2006 7:54 am

As for another supplement that may help with BBB permeability, any food or supplement containing proanthocyanosides or anthocyanosides should help stengthen the endothelial lining of the BBB. Anthocyanosides are found in berries, particularly blueberries and bilberries (European cousin). In Europe, bilberry extract is used to help with diabetic retinopathy.


Studies on vascular permeability in hypertension: action of anthocyanosides.

Clin Physiol Biochem, 4(2):143-9 1986

The initial phase of renal hypertension induced by ligature of the abdominal aorta was accompanied by a transient increase in vascular permeability. This permeability increase has not the same intensity in all parts of the organism: it is greater in the skin and in the aorta wall than in the brain vessels. Treatment of rats with a flavonoid-type drug (anthocyanosides of Vaccinium myrtillus) for 12 days before the induction of hypertension kept the blood-brain barrier permeability normal and limited the increase in vascular permeability in the skin and the aorta wall. As previously demonstrated, the collagens of the blood vessel walls play an important role in the control of vascular permeability. Interaction of these collagens with the drug may be partly responsible for the protection against the permeability-increasing action of hypertension observed in the treated animals.

Action of anthocyanosides of Vaccinium myrtillis on the permeability of the blood drain barrier.

J Med, 4(2):321-32 1977

Proteases and especially collagenase injected into the lateral brain ventricles of rats are able to increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to trypan blue. Treatment of the rats with anthocyanosides of Vaccinium myrtillis diminishes the permeability increasing effect of collagenase and accelerate the recovery of normal permeability. This effect seems to be related to a less effective enzymatic attack on collagen, as hydroxyproline content in the CSF is increased less after collagenase injection in treated animals than in untreated controls.
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Mention of aortic wall makes me recall...

Postby lyndacarol » Sat Jul 01, 2006 11:07 am

In the material by Y. Singh (U.S. Pharmacist, October 2004 feature on Vitamin D), the aortic endothelial cells were listed as one of about 30 locations in the body that have Vitamin D receptors (VDR). Why? What reactions could they be involved with? (In other words, what goes wrong or doesn't happen if there is a deficiency or insufficiency of Vitamin D?) Could there be VDRs in the BBB, too?

Oh, to have a background in human biology! But maybe the "experts" don't know either!
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Postby verminsquibble » Sat Jul 01, 2006 12:14 pm

Off of David Wheldon's website:

Vitamin D is vital for the maintenance of the blood/brain barrier. Not only may a mild Vitamin D deficiency allow ingress of Chl pneumoniae; it may also activate quiescent infections. The number of active white-matter lesions seen on MRI in persons with MS closely follows the seasonal fluctuation of levels of circulating Vitamin D.

I am sure Jimmylegs is thrilled to see this :D

VS
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bbb and d

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Jul 01, 2006 12:54 pm

woo hoo! i love the smell of cholecalciferol in the scorching midday sun
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Postby CureOrBust » Sat Aug 12, 2006 11:02 pm

I was browsing, when I came accross the following page, which had the paragrah below.

http://www.direct-ms.org/bestbet.html

Experiments with animals have shown that there are three related chemicals, anthocyanosides, proanthocyanidins and procyanidolic oligomers, which strengthen the BBB (Robert et al., 1977; Detre et al., 1986). These chemical are found in blueberries, cherries, blackberries, grapes and the bark and needles of certain pine trees. They are currently available as encapsulated supplements called bilberry, grape seed extract and pycnogenol.
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For Lyon

Postby notasperfectasyou » Sat Nov 18, 2006 9:27 pm

I think I found the article. Lyon got me thinking about this so here's the one I believe I was thinking about above.......
napay

Determinants of Human B Cell Migration Across Brain Endothelial Cells
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