mitochondrial dysfunction

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mitochondrial dysfunction

Postby dignan » Tue Aug 22, 2006 8:45 am

Mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be getting quite a bit of research attention these days, lets hope all the study leads to effective therapies.



Mitochondrial protein nitration primes neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

J Biol Chem. 2006 Aug 18;
Qi X, Lewin AS, Sun L, Hauswirth WW, Guy J.
Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32605.

The mechanisms of axonal and neuronal degeneration causing visual and neurologic disability in multiple sclerosis are poorly understood. Here we explore the contribution of mitochondria to neurodegeneration in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis animal model of multiple sclerosis.

Oxidative injury to the murine mitochondrion preceded the infiltration of inflammatory cells, classically heralded as the mediators of demyelination and axonal injury by transection. Nitration of mitochondrial proteins affected key subunits of complexes I and IV of the respiratory chain and a chaperone critical to the stabilization and translocation of proteins into the organelle. Oxidative products were associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptotic cell death. Reductions in ATP synthesis were severe and even greater than those associated with disorders caused by mutated mitochondrial DNA. Mitochondrial vacuolization, swelling and dissolution of cristae occurred in axons as early as 3 days after sensitization for EAE.

Our findings implicate mitochondrial dysfunction induced by protein inactivation and mediated by oxidative stress initiates a cascade of molecular events leading to apoptosis and neurodegeneration in EAE that is not mediated by inflammatory cells.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum
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Postby mrhodes40 » Tue Aug 22, 2006 9:07 am

Gee DIgnan I see that as an extremely important paper. thank you for posting it
marie
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Postby topcat72 » Wed Aug 23, 2006 3:28 pm

"Oxidative injury to the murine mitochondrion preceded the infiltration of inflammatory cells, classically heralded as the mediators of demyelination and axonal injury by transection"

What would cause this oxidative injury? I may appear slightly more concerned as I am a smoker (albeit light) and know that smoking can cause oxidative stress. It also makes me wonder more and more about the healing potential of "Pranayam" or yogic breathing!

Thanks for the info.

RT
The rules of life and bonds of sorrow, in reality are the one manifestation
Before realizing the ultimate truth, how can then one attain liberation?

Mirza Ghalib (1797 - 1869)
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Postby dignan » Wed Aug 23, 2006 5:06 pm

Yogic breathing, whatever you want to call it -- glad you brought it up, I was meaning to look into that a little. Here's what I saw on Pubmed.



Effect of a comprehensive yoga-based lifestyle modification program on lipid peroxidation.

Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2005 Jul-Sep;49(3):358-62.
Yadav RK, Ray RB, Vempati R, Bijlani RL.
Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. raj3kr@yahoo.co.in

Oxidative stress contributes to the process of aging as well as a variety of chronic degenerative diseases. There are indications that psychological stress increases oxidative stress whereas relaxation decreases it. We have measured the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in blood as an indicator of oxidative stress at the beginning and at the end of a comprehensive yoga-based lifestyle modification program (YLMP).

The data was collected from 104 subjects (59 male, 45 female), 19-71 years of age (mean +/- SD, 41.2 +/- 14.6 years). The YLMP consisted of a nine-day educational out-patient course on the theory and practice of yoga and included, besides a daily one-hour practice of physical postures (asanas) and breathing exercises (pranayama), lecture and films on yoga, stress management and nutrition, practice of meditation and shavasana (a relaxation technique), and individual counseling. Venous blood samples were collected on the first and last day of the course. The serum concentration of TBARS decreased significantly from 1.72 +/- 0.72 nmoles/ml on day 1 to 1.57 +/- 0.72 nmoles/ml on day 10 (P<0.05).

The study suggests that a brief low cost lifestyle intervention based on yoga reduces oxidative stress.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum



Short-term effects of an intensive lifestyle modification program on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant systems in patients with coronary artery disease.

Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2003;29(3-4):429-36.
Jatuporn S, Sangwatanaroj S, Saengsiri AO, Rattanapruks S, Srimahachota S, Uthayachalerm W, Kuanoon W, Panpakdee O, Tangkijvanich P, Tosukhowong P.
Department of Biochemistry, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. srisakul.j@chula.ac.th

The purpose of this study was to compare the short-term effects of an intensive lifestyle modification (ILM) program on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant systems in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).

Twenty-two patients in the control group continued to receive their conventional treatment with lipid-lowering drugs, whereas 22 patients in the experimental group were assigned to intensive lifestyle modification (ILM) without taking any lipid-lowering agent. The ILM program comprised dietary advice on low-fat diets, high antioxidants and high fiber intakes, yoga exercise, stress management and smoking cessation.

After 4 months of intervention, patients in the experimental group revealed a statistically significant increase in plasma total antioxidants, plasma vitamin E and erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) compared to patients in the control group. There was no significant change in plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), a circulating product of lipid peroxidation, in either group.

We concluded that the ILM program increased circulating antioxidants and reduced oxidative stress in patients with CAD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum



Improvement in oxidative status with yogic breathing in young healthy males.

Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2002 Jul;46(3):349-54.
Bhattacharya S, Pandey US, Verma NS.
Department of Physiology, King George's Medical College, Lucknow, 226 003.

The modern living lifestyle is known to produce various physical and psychological stresses and subject the individual to produce oxidative stresses as well. The aim of this study has been to assess the effect of yogic breathing exercises (pranayama) on the oxidatives stress.

The study group consisted of 30 young male volunteers, trained for the purpose of this study and an equal number of controls were used. The free radicals and Super oxide dismutase (SOD) levels were measured before the study and at the end of the study.

The free radicals were decreased significantly in the study group but the SOD was increased insignificantly as compared to the control group. Yogic breathing exercises not only help in relieving the stresses of life but also improve the antioxidant status of the individual. An improvement in the antioxidant status is helpful in preventing many pathological processes that are known with impaired antioxidant system of body.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_docsum
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