Fibrinogen

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Fibrinogen

Postby 1eye » Mon Aug 28, 2017 5:47 pm

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Re: Fibrinogen

Postby TomHennessy » Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:41 am

1eye wrote:http://www.msnetwork.org/ccsvihistory.htm#clotting

The cause is becoming known...


"Canola-type rapeseed oil reduces the level of fibrinogen, a leading cause of thrombosis and inflammation "
"The new research demonstrates for the first time that an increase in the fibrinogen level of the blood is largely caused by the lack of omega-3-alpha-linolenic acid in the diet. When there is too little of this beneficial fatty acid found in one?s diet, an imbalance between fatty acids in the body is created. When the omega-3-alpha-linolenic acid level is too low, the body starts to manufacture more harmful omega-6-arachidonic acid out of the omega-6-linoleic acid, creating hormone-like compounds that cause thrombosis and inflammation. According to the researchers, the fat composition of rapeseed oil is optimal with regard to fatty acids essential to the body and consequently is well-suited to reduce the fibrinogen levels in the blood. "
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Re: Fibrinogen

Postby NHE » Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:31 am

1eye wrote:http://www.msnetwork.org/ccsvihistory.htm#clotting

The cause is becoming known...

Has anyone tried taking supplemental nattokinase to reduce fibrin levels?
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Re: Fibrinogen

Postby 1eye » Sat Sep 16, 2017 8:56 am

Reducing fibrinogen by playing balancing games with canola oil, nattokinase, etc, will not prevent the autoimmune cascade brought on by one drop of blood on the wrong side of the blood-brain barrier. Once blood is in the brain, the brain becomes very vulnerable.
Cerebral Microbleeds in Multiple Sclerosis Evaluated on Susceptibility-weighted Images and Quantitative Susceptibility Maps: A Case-Control Study.
Zivadinov R1, Ramasamy DP1, Benedict RR1, Polak P1, Hagemeier J1, Magnano C1, Dwyer MG1, Bergsland N1, Bertolino N1, Weinstock-Guttman B1, Kolb C1, Hojnacki D1, Utriainen D1, Haacke EM1, Schweser F1.
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Abstract

Purpose To assess cerebral microbleed (CMB) prevalence in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and associations with clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods CMBs are associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders. The prevalence of CMBs has not previously been well established. In this study, 445 patients with MS (266 with relapsing-remitting MS, 138 with secondary progressive MS, and 41 with primary progressive MS), 45 patients with CIS, 51 patients with other neurological diseases, and 177 healthy control subjects (HCs) underwent 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical examinations. A subset of 168 patients with MS and 50 HCs underwent neuropsychological testing. Number of CMBs was assessed on susceptibility-weighted minimum intensity projections by using the Microbleed Anatomic Rating Scale; volume was calculated by using quantitative susceptibility maps. Differences between groups were analyzed with the χ2 test, Fisher exact test, Student t test, and analysis of variance; associations of CMBs with clinical and other MR imaging outcomes were explored with correlation and regression analyses. Because CMB frequency increases with age, prevalence was investigated in participants at least 50 years of age and younger than 50 years. Results Significantly more patients with MS than HCs had CMBs (19.8% vs 7.4%, respectively; P = .01) in the group at least 50 years old. A trend toward greater presence of CMBs was found in patients with MS (P = .016) and patients with CIS who were younger than 50 years (P = .039) compared with HCs. In regression analysis adjusted for age, hypertension, and normalized brain volume, increased number of CMBs was significantly associated with increased physical disability in the MS population (R2 = 0.23, P < .0001). In correlation analysis, increased number of CMBs was significantly associated with deteriorated auditory and verbal learning and memory (P = .006) and visual information processing speed trends (P = .049) in patients with MS. Conclusion Monitoring CMBs may be relevant in patients with MS and CIS at higher risk for developing cognitive and physical disability. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.
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Re: Fibrinogen

Postby 1eye » Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:05 pm

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Re: Fibrinogen

Postby 1eye » Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:25 pm

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