MRI report

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MRI report

Postby mrna » Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:31 am

Hi MRI report result stated few small foci of non enhancing t2/ flair signal involving the right frontal white matter are noted, particularly along the right superior frontal gyrus, nonspecific and possibly incidental with differential considerations including sequelae of prior infectious/ inflammatory process and demyelinating disease.

Everything else was normal . Symptoms are just ptosis or drooping of the right eyelid. Nothing else

If someone can please decipher the terminology and language and let me know what this means

I appreciate the help



Thank you
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Re: MRI report

Postby ElliotB » Sun Sep 03, 2017 11:35 am

Did you ask your doctor?
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Re: MRI report

Postby NHE » Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:10 pm

mrna wrote:Hi MRI report result stated few small foci of non enhancing t2/ flair signal involving the right frontal white matter are noted, particularly along the right superior frontal gyrus, nonspecific and possibly incidental with differential considerations including sequelae of prior infectious/ inflammatory process and demyelinating disease.

Everything else was normal . Symptoms are just ptosis or drooping of the right eyelid. Nothing else

If someone can please decipher the terminology and language and let me know what this means


I'm not an MRI expert, but I'll offer what I can.

...non enhancing: means that they're old lesions and not sites of active inflammation.

...flair signal: This is a special MRI mode that removes the water signal to improve resolution.
FLAIR MRI = Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery MRI

https://radiopaedia.org/articles/fluid- ... n-recovery

...right superior frontal gyrus: "The superior frontal gyrus is a broad longitudinal gyral formation running in an anteroposterior direction along the dorsal-medial margin of the frontal lobe until the precentral sulcus. That part of this gyrus on convex surface is distinguished as lateral SFG. It is bounded by the longitudinal fissure and the superior frontal sulcus."

http://www.thehumanbrain.info/brain/sections.php

...nonspecific and possibly incidental with differential considerations including sequelae of prior infectious/ inflammatory process and demyelinating disease: The lesion could be due to a variety of factors and is not specific to MS. Possible reasons given include prior infection or inflammation. Many things can cause lesions in the brain, e.g., migraines, sleep apnea, etc.

Here are some examples of MS lesions, many of which are periventricular.

https://radiopaedia.org/search?q=multip ... cope=cases
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Re: MRI report

Postby mrna » Mon Sep 04, 2017 4:42 am

Thank you very much. That was very helpful. Thank you
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Re: MRI report

Postby centenarian100 » Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:53 pm

to MRNA:

Radiologists often read films in a broad way because they do no know the clinical history of the patient. Many people have non-specific benign white matter lesions that are insignificant. These are common in people as they get older, but they can also be seen in young people, especially those with migraines. For instance, the lesions shown in this MRI are completely benign and insignificant (despite the dubious label posted by a clueless blogger)

Image

Multiple sclerosis usually is associated with lesions which are large, well-demarcated, and in specific anatomic locations such as the corpus callosum, periventricular area, juxtacortical area, and brainstem

Image

You just need a reasonably experienced doctor who will look at your scans and take into account your clinical history and exam and tell you whether the lesions are benign or significant.

Hope this helps

-Cent
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Re: MRI report

Postby 1eye » Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:33 pm

You might want to read the thread in the CCSVI forum on the Central Vein Sign. An experienced radiologist can recognize the pattern of lesions as the Cenral Vein Sign, which is usually considered to be consistent witn MS.
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Re: MRI report

Postby 1eye » Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:43 pm

Multiple sclerosis usually is associated with lesions which are large, well-demarcated, and in specific anatomic locations such as the corpus callosum, periventricular area, juxtacortical area, and brainstem
.

This, and the MRI accompanying it, is misleading. MS lesions are not necessarily large at all, especially at first, and maybe not ever. The Central Vein Sign will be present even when the lesions are still small. None of mine were anywhere near as large when I was diagnosed. They were very small focal hyperintensities. No contrast was required for my diagnosis. I would definitely consult your radiologist, not this forum.
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Re: MRI report

Postby 1eye » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:09 am

You might also want to read to the end of http://www.thisisms.com/forum/chronic-cerebrospinal-venous-insufficiency-ccsvi-f40/topic29390.html where I describe my experience with doctors who order MRIs. You should probably ask for a copy of the radiology report.
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Re: MRI report

Postby 1eye » Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:48 am

The venocentric distribution of lesions exists in all MS clinical phenotypes (RRMS, SPMS and PPMS)


This means we are finally free of these "phenotypes" which are merely ways for insurance people to exclude patients from treatment (on actuarial/financial grounds). Perhaps we can start treating the disease, now that we can identify it.
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