im a sloppy riter

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im a sloppy riter

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Nov 11, 2017 4:16 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:

English 289 Intermediate Composition
Genre Analysis
https://caseymdeng289.wordpress.com

"There are several nonprofessional (popular) and professional sources of information on this topic. Sources comprised of the former used in this genre analysis are an article from The New York Times and a multiple sclerosis website, both of which give valuable information about MS. The latter sources considered are two peer-reviewed journals that study curtain problems that result from this disease in more detail. ...

"The nonprofessional theme continues with the website http://www.thisisms.com, which is a blog used by MS sufferers in a forum format. ...

"For example, the professional sources distribute information about MS to their audience by using observed facts or data collected in studies or trials, while the popular sources employ elements of emotion to capture the audience, making the disease something that can be overcome with “friendly” advice. ...

(we're only 'air quotes' friendly :lol: )

"It is important to analyze these two different genres of rhetorical writing to understand how elements of persuasion (ethos, pathos, and logos) are used for relaying similar information. For example, the professional sources distribute information about MS to their audience by using observed facts or data collected in studies or trials, while the popular sources employ elements of emotion to capture the audience, making the disease something that can be overcome with “friendly” advice. In addition, the ability of recognizing what genre is being used can help the reader use the information properly, preparing them to have the correct mindset for receiving data.

"Audience and Purpose
The audience in the New York Times article is geared towards the public, those who are not informed about the issues surrounding MS, not informed or unclear of the symptoms, or the crippling effects the disease has on individuals suffering from it. It starts the article by giving a clear definition of what MS is, explaining how nerves are protected in a myelin covering and how they are damaged. It also gives the readers technical terms with definitions for them, further displaying the basic, elementary elements of the disease. The way the article slowly builds the readers vocabulary by adding components one at a time with bullets points helps for better understanding. From top to bottom, it introduces the most basic terminology to the more complex pathology’s of the disease. The blog (http://www.thisisms.com) has an audience that is well informed and, in fact, are dealing with the disease from day to day. These persons have a more knowledgeable vocabulary of the subject matter and will be able to decipher technical jargon. The audience reading the former article will spend much time reading to build their vocabulary and will be generally informed, while the later audience can glance through articles to gather needed information and possibly be well entertained.

(at least we're kinda smart!)

"Unlike The New York Times publication, the language is very informal on the website. ...
The Times article is very formal and structured, which leads to the notion that it is a credible, well-established source of information. ...
In contrast, quoting jimmylegs words of “definitely feeling the magnesium connection on this one” from the other popular article gives the sense that no specialized vocabulary is needed"

(hope no one was traumatized by the academic article which directly follows that touchy-feely tidbit ;) )

"On the other hand, the popular genre can give way to a lack of intrigue from professional readers because of the lack of structure – no capital letters in the blog to establish the start of a new sentence, thus a new thought 2 – and the tendency for non-subject matter to infiltrate the writing."

so wHaT d!d 3v3ryb0dy hAv3 for DiNn3r?
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
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Re: im a sloppy riter

Postby Scott1 » Sat Nov 11, 2017 5:58 pm

Hi,

This site exists and thrives because of the failings of the so called experts drives people with MS to look further.

Everything ends up being covered here from suicide to depression, spasticity to incontinence, lack of support to outright aggression from others and on and on.

When you have had MS for a long time and sit opposite a neurologist and have to tell him which drugs need to be tested in case they cause PML you know there is something wrong with the system.

When you watch the experts embrace then abandon an approach they considered to be the gold standard because it doesn't work then where do you go?

When you have been through treatment protocols, delivered by so called professionals, and find when you are finished you are no better or perhaps worse off where should you look?

When your cardiologist says "I know nothing about MS" and your neurologist says "I know nothing about cardiology" should just accept there is no point looking further?

When "experts" spend more time trying to put labels on a disease and splice it into categories are they actually helping anyone other than themselves?

When a neurologist puts his hand on your leg and mutters that its tight do you have to be an expert to do that?

When researchers publish something in 2017 and you can find an almost identical article dated 1994 are you not entitled to wonder if specialists talk to each other, read their peer literature or actually understand their senior publications like Nature, the Journal of cell Biology and on and on are not for decoration?

MSUK have have provided links to this site that show an absurdly high proportion of medical practitioners are very uncomfortable dealing with patients who have neurological problems because they don't know what to do about them.

This site publishes links to sites that talk about significant breakthroughs in research and its obvious when you see a clinician that they are oblivious to these findings.

No one here can write a prescription, access diagnostic tools or treat a patient. But, we can tell you where to look, what to look for and what works for us. That is the benefit of practical experience.

The bulk of clinicians are just interested in the hourly rate and building up a client list. No one here is a client of another. We do read the medical literature and show it to each other.

Most MS societies exist to sustain themselves. Their senior management are fund raisers not the people who get their hands dirty. What a pity that is. Playing politics is not the game on a site like this.

So if this site is about "friendly" advice then what sort of advice comes from the people who fail to test for JCV, see you once or twice a year or pompously say there is no cure.

It says a lot when the author of that article thinks the use of capital letters determines quality.

Don't know where it came from but it gets an F for clear thinking.

Regards,
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Re: im a sloppy riter

Postby jimmylegs » Sat Nov 11, 2017 6:17 pm

probably this by the looks of things:

http://www.artsci.uc.edu/departments/en ... tions.html
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
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Re: im a sloppy riter

Postby THX1138 » Sat Nov 11, 2017 8:07 pm

The writer of the article cited above obviously failed to comprehend the field specific, highly specialized nomenclature contained in the phrase, “definitely feeling the magnesium connection on this one”.

And you even have the pathos, that is the feeling part, down too.
pathos
[pey-thos, -thohs, -thaws]
Spell Syllables
Examples Word Origin
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
1.
the quality or power in an actual life experience or in literature, music, speech, or other forms of expression, of evoking a feeling of pity, or of sympathetic and kindly sorrow or compassion.
2.
pity.
3.
Obsolete. suffering.
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/pathos


The audience reading the former article will spend much time reading to build their vocabulary and will be generally informed, while the later audience can glance through articles to gather needed information and possibly be well entertained.
Yes it's the thrill ride of the season.
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Re: im a sloppy riter

Postby NHE » Sun Nov 12, 2017 10:13 am

Scott1 wrote:When you have had MS for a long time and sit opposite a neurologist and have to tell him which drugs need to be tested in case they cause PML you know there is something wrong with the system.

When you watch the experts embrace then abandon an approach they considered to be the gold standard because it doesn't work then where do you go?

When you have been through treatment protocols, delivered by so called professionals, and find when you are finished you are no better or perhaps worse off where should you look?

When your cardiologist says "I know nothing about MS" and your neurologist says "I know nothing about cardiology" should just accept there is no point looking further?

When "experts" spend more time trying to put labels on a disease and splice it into categories are they actually helping anyone other than themselves?

When a neurologist puts his hand on your leg and mutters that its tight do you have to be an expert to do that?

When researchers publish something in 2017 and you can find an almost identical article dated 1994 are you not entitled to wonder if specialists talk to each other, read their peer literature or actually understand their senior publications like Nature, the Journal of cell Biology and on and on are not for decoration?

I had a neurologist tell me that there was no connection between vitamin D and magnesium. He still held that position even after I told him that I was getting charlie horse leg cramps in my feet and calf muscles and had them go away never to return after changing the timing of my magnesium so I took it in the morning and took the vitamin D in the evening. That's the same neurologist who didn't even bother to look at my MRI scans and just read the radiologist's report instead.
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