M.S. Don't grouse, degauss. If you can't chill out, chelate.

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.

M.S. Don't grouse, degauss. If you can't chill out, chelate.

Postby gristy56 » Mon Dec 11, 2017 2:16 am

Multiple Sclerosis is not an auto-immune condition as they insist. It is due to an overload of magnetite in the prescence of tiny electromagnetic fields at 50 Hz. It is prevented by placing steel wire wool in the pillow at night. It is reversed by degaussing and then chelating assisted by a Multiiple Sclerosis 'Desatascador' which you buy from the intermet as a personal fan costing less than 4e! and modifying in 2 seconds flat. I've had MS for almost 34 years but very soon it will be a thing of the past. If you have sensible comments or questions, just ask.
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Re: M.S. Don't grouse, degauss. If you can't chill out, chel

Postby ElliotB » Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:06 pm

I have asked before, can you please post instructions and/or a video on how to build a Multiiple Sclerosis 'Desatascador'.
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Re: M.S. Don't grouse, degauss. If you can't chill out, chel

Postby PJM26 » Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:12 am

ElliotB wrote:I have asked before, can you please post instructions and/or a video on how to build a Multiiple Sclerosis 'Desatascador'.


I echo this sentiment.

Make a video!!!
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Re: M.S. Don't grouse, degauss. If you can't chill out, chel

Postby jimmylegs » Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:10 am

related sci does not emphasize ms across the board, but fwiw

Increased levels of magnetic iron compounds in Alzheimer's disease (2008)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18334756
Abstract
A study of the magnetic properties of superior temporal gyrus brain tissue from 11 Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 11 age-matched control subjects demonstrates an exponential correlation between the concentrations of the Fe;{2+}-ion-containing iron oxide, magnetite (Fe{3}O{4}), and the fraction of those particles that are smaller than 20 nm in diameter. These data provide circumstantial evidence in favor of their genesis within the 8 nm diameter cores of the iron storage protein ferritin. We also show, for the first time, that the total concentration of biogenic magnetite is generally higher in the AD brain (in some cases as much as 15 times greater than controls) and that there are gender-based differences, with AD female subjects having significantly higher concentrations than all other groups. These results provide insights which may guide current efforts to develop iron-based MRI diagnosis of AD.

ties neatly back in with this in vitro work:

Zinc Deficiency-induced Iron Accumulation, a Consequence of Alterations in Iron Regulatory Protein-binding Activity, Iron Transporters, and Iron Storage Proteins (2007)
http://www.jbc.org/content/283/8/5168.short
One consequence of zinc deficiency is an elevation in cell and tissue iron concentrations. To examine the mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon, Swiss 3T3 cells were cultured in zinc-deficient (D, 0.5 μM zinc), zinc-supplemented (S, 50 μM zinc), or control (C, 4 μM zinc) media. After 24 h of culture, cells in the D group were characterized by a 50% decrease in intracellular zinc and a 35% increase in intracellular iron relative to cells in the S and C groups. The increase in cellular iron was associated with increased transferrin receptor 1 protein and mRNA levels and increased ferritin light chain expression. The divalent metal transporter 1(+)iron-responsive element isoform mRNA was decreased during zinc deficiency-induced iron accumulation. Examination of zinc-deficient cells revealed increased binding of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) and decreased binding of IRP1 to a consensus iron-responsive element. The increased IRP2-binding activity in zinc-deficient cells coincided with an increased level of IRP2 protein. The accumulation of IRP2 protein was independent of zinc deficiency-induced intracellular nitric oxide production but was attenuated by the addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or ascorbate to the D medium. These data support the concept that zinc deficiency can result in alterations in iron transporter, storage, and regulatory proteins, which facilitate iron accumulation.

Subclinical Zinc Deficiency in Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease (2010)
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10. ... 7510382283
To evaluate zinc status in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, 29 patients with Alzheimer’s disease, 30 patients with Parkinson’s disease, and 29 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. All patients and controls were older than age 50, and all zinc and copper supplements were prohibited beginning 30 days prior to study. Patients were diagnosed by standard criteria. Blood zinc and urine zinc were measured. Urine zinc was measured in a casual specimen, standardized for dilution by reference to creatinine content. Results showed a significantly lower blood zinc in patients with Alzheimer’s and patients with Parkinson’s than in controls. Urine zinc excretion, normalized to urine creatinine excretion, was not significantly different in either patient group compared to controls. These patients are probably zinc deficient because of nutritional inadequacy.

Serum Copper, Zinc, and Iron Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies (2017)
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10 ... 00300/full
Background: Many publications have investigated the association between metal ions and the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the results were ambiguous.
Aims: The objective of this study was to assess the association between the serum levels of metals (copper/zinc/iron) and the risk of AD via meta-analysis of case-control studies.
Methods: We screened literatures published after 1978 in the Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane library, Web of Science and ClinicalTrials.gov. Electronic databases. By using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we performed a systematic review of the 407 publications, there are 44 of these publications met all inclusion criteria. The Review Manager 5.3 software was used to calculate available data from each study.
Results: Consistent with the conclusions of other meta-analysis, our results demonstrated serum copper levels were significantly higher [MD = 9.27, 95% CI (5.02–13.52); p < 0.0001], and the serum zinc levels were significantly lower in AD patients than in healthy controls [MD = −6.12, 95% CI (−9.55, −2.69); p = 0.0005]. Serum iron levels were significantly lower in AD patients than in healthy controls after excluded two studies [MD = −13.01, 95% CI (−20.75, −5.27); p = 0.001].
Conclusion: The results of our meta-analysis provided rigorous statistical support for the association of the serum levels of metals and the risk of AD, suggesting a positive relationship between the serum copper levels and AD risk, and a negative relationship between the serum zinc/iron levels and AD risk.

have had lengthy evaluation on the significance of copper zinc ratio elsewhere here on the site.

not sure whether/how this factors into the equation:

Copper, iron, and zinc imbalances in severely degenerated brain regions in Alzheimer's disease: possible relation to oxidative stress (1996)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8981312
Abstract
Copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) levels in five different brain regions (amygdala, hippocampus, inferior parietal lobule, superior and middle temporal gyri, and cerebellum) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched control subjects. A significant decrease in Cu, and significant increases in Zn and Fe were found in AD hippocampus and amygdala, areas showing severe histopathologic alterations in AD. None of these elements were significantly imbalanced in the cerebellum which is minimally affected in AD.
odd sx? no dx? check w/ dietitian
DRI=MINIMUM eg bit.ly/1vgQclQ
99% don't meet these. meds/lifestyle can affect levels
status can be low in ms & other cond'ns
'but my results are normal'. typical panels don't test all
deficits occur in 'normal' range
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Re: M.S. Don't grouse, degauss. If you can't chill out, chel

Postby NHE » Fri Dec 15, 2017 1:16 am

ElliotB wrote:I have asked before, can you please post instructions and/or a video on how to build a Multiiple Sclerosis 'Desatascador'.

The Spanish word desatascador translates to plunger as in a sink or toilet plunger...
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Re: M.S. Don't grouse, degauss. If you can't chill out, chel

Postby ElliotB » Fri Dec 15, 2017 5:45 am

I was looking for info on the device on the web and really could not find any (did see some info on the OP) but that definition did come up and I did chuckle when I saw that!

The OP has repeatedly posted general information about this device on many different sites including TIMS but it seems he has never provided specifics and has never replied to my specific queries.
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