PM10

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PM10

Postby Petr75 » Fri Jul 13, 2018 1:04 pm

May 2018
METIS Department, EHESP French School of Public Health, Rennes, France ..
Ozone, NO2 and PM10 are associated with the occurrence of multiple sclerosis relapses. Evidence from seasonal multi-pollutant analyses
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 5118300422

Highlights
•Season-dependent associations between short term exposure to NO2 and O3 and risk of MS relapses were observed.
•Confirmation of PM10-associated risk of MS relapses.
•A multi-pollutant approach should be systematically intended, especially when assessing level of PM10 and NO2.
•Individual characteristics should be considered alongside other MS relapses risk factors.

Conclusion
We observed significant single-pollution associations between the occurrence of MS relapses and exposures to NO2, O3 and PM10, only O3 remained significantly associated with occurrence of MS relapses in the multi-pollutant model.
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Re: PM10

Postby Petr75 » Fri Jul 13, 2018 1:12 pm

2017 Sep 27
Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands
Long-Term Air Pollution Exposure and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in Netherlands: A Population-based Case-control Stud
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29989551

BACKGROUND:
Recently, there has been increasing evidence that exposure to air pollution is linked to neurodegenerative diseases, but little is known about the association with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

CONCLUSIONS:
Based on a large population-based case-control study, we report evidence for the association between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and increased susceptibility to ALS. Our findings further support the necessity for regulatory public health interventions to combat air pollution levels and provide additional insight into the potential pathophysiology of ALS.
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Re: PM10

Postby Petr75 » Fri Jul 27, 2018 8:54 am

2015 Dec 6
Epigenetics and Toxicology Lab - Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via San Barnaba, Italy
Effects of particulate matter exposure on multiple sclerosis hospital admission in Lombardy region, Italy
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4797990/

..Results
A higher RR of hospital admission for MS relapse was associated with exposure to PM10 at different time intervals. The maximum effect of PM10 on MS hospitalization was found for exposure between days 0 and 7: Hospital admission for MS increased 42% (95%CI 1.39–1.45) on the days preceded by one week with PM10 levels in the highest quartile. The p-value for trend across quartiles was < 0.001.

Conclusions
These data support the hypothesis that air pollution may have a role in determining MS occurrence and relapses. Our findings could open new avenues for determining the pathogenic mechanisms of MS and potentially be applied to other autoimmune diseases.
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Re: PM10

Postby Petr75 » Tue Aug 07, 2018 10:08 pm

2014 May
State Meteorological Agency (AEMET), Madrid, Spain
Partitioning of magnetic particles in PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 aerosols in the urban atmosphere of Barcelona (Spain)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24583390

Abstract
A combined magnetic-chemical study of 15 daily, simultaneous PM10-PM2.5-PM1 urban background aerosol samples has been carried out. The magnetic properties are dominated by non-stoichiometric magnetite, with highest concentrations seen in PM10. Low temperature magnetic analyses showed that the superparamagnetic fraction is more abundant when coarse, multidomain particles are present, confirming that they may occur as an oxidized outer shell around coarser grains. A strong association of the magnetic parameters with a vehicular PM10 source has been identified. Strong correlations found with Cu and Sb suggests that this association is related to brake abrasion emissions rather than exhaust emissions. For PM1 the magnetic remanence parameters are more strongly associated with crustal sources. Two crustal sources are identified in PM1, one of which is of North African origin. The magnetic particles are related to this source and so may be used to distinguish North African dust from other sources in PM1.
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Re: PM10

Postby Petr75 » Wed Aug 22, 2018 12:03 pm

2018 Aug 17
Department of Epidemiology, Lazio Regional Health Service, ASL Roma 1, 00147 Rome, Italy
Short-Term Effects of Heat on Mortality and Effect Modification by Air Pollution in 25 Italian Cities.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30126130

Abstract
Evidence on the health effects of extreme temperatures and air pollution is copious. However few studies focused on their interaction. The aim of this study is to evaluate daily PM10 and ozone as potential effect modifiers of the relationship between temperature and natural mortality in 25 Italian cities. Time-series analysis was run for each city. To evaluate interaction, a tensor product between mean air temperature (lag 0⁻3) and either PM10 or ozone (both lag 0⁻5) was defined and temperature estimates were extrapolated at low, medium, and high levels of pollutants. Heat effects were estimated as percent change in mortality for increases in temperature between 75th and 99th percentiles. Results were pooled by geographical area. Differential temperature-mortality risks by air pollutants were found. For PM10, estimates ranged from 3.9% (low PM10) to 14.1% (high PM10) in the North, from 3.6% to 24.4% in the Center, and from 7.5% to 21.6% in the South. Temperature-related mortality was similarly modified by ozone in northern and central Italy, while no effect modification was observed in the South. This study underlines the synergistic effects of heat and air pollution on mortality. Considering the predicted increase in heat waves and stagnation events in the Mediterranean countries such as Italy, it is time to enclose air pollution within public health heat prevention plans.
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Re: PM10

Postby Petr75 » Sat Aug 25, 2018 9:12 pm

2018 Aug 22
Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration on Bamboo Resources and Utilization, China National Bamboo Research Center, State Forestry Administration, Hangzhou, Zhe Jiang, China
Phyllostachys edulis forest reduces atmospheric PM2.5 and PAHs on hazy days at suburban area
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30135438

Abstract
This study is aim to illustrate Phyllostachys edulis' role in affecting air quality under hazy day and solar day. P. edulis is a crucial plants growing well at suburban area at China Southern. In this manuscript, on 2 weather conditions (hazy day; solar day), changes in atmospheric particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), associated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and PAHs in leaves and soils were measured, with PM-detection equipment and the GC-MC method, in a typical bamboo forest at suburban areas. The results showed that: (1) Bamboo forest decreased atmospheric PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations significantly by 20% and 15%, respectively, on the hazy day nightfall time, when they were times higher than that on any other time. Also, similar effects on atmospheric PAHs and VOCs were found. (2) Significant increases in PAHs of leaves and soil were found inside the forest on the hazy day. (3) Bamboo forest also reduced the atmospheric VOC concentrations, and changed the compounds of 10 VOCs present in the highest concentration list. Thus, bamboo forests strongly regulate atmospheric PM2.5 through capture or retention, for the changes in atmospheric VOCs and increase in PAHs of leaves and soil.
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Re: PM10

Postby NHE » Sun Aug 26, 2018 2:21 am

This may be of interest.

Birch trees halve traffic pollution
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/lec/news-and ... news/2013/

Here's the published research.

Impact of roadside tree lines on indoor concentrations of traffic-derived particulate matter
Environ Sci Technol. 2013 Dec 3;47(23):13737-44.

    Exposure to airborne particulate pollution is associated with premature mortality and a range of inflammatory illnesses, linked to toxic components within the particulate matter (PM) assemblage. The effectiveness of trees in reducing urban PM10 concentrations is intensely debated. Modeling studies indicate PM10 reductions from as low as 1% to as high as ~60%. Empirical data, especially at the local scale, are rare. Here, we use conventional PM10 monitoring along with novel, inexpensive magnetic measurements of television screen swabs to measure changes in PM10 concentrations inside a row of roadside houses, after temporarily installing a curbside line of young birch trees. Independently, the two approaches identify >50% reductions in measured PM levels inside those houses screened by the temporary tree line. Electron microscopy analyses show that leafcaptured PM is concentrated in agglomerations around leaf hairs and within the leaf microtopography. Iron-rich, ultrafine, spherical particles, probably combustion-derived, are abundant, form a particular hazard to health, and likely contribute much of the measured magnetic remanences. Leaf magnetic measurements show that PM capture occurs on both the road-proximal and -distal sides of the trees. The efficacy of roadside trees for mitigation of PM health hazard might be seriously underestimated in some current atmospheric models.

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