What Is the Safest Cookware to Use?

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Re: What Is the Safest Cookware to Use?

Postby Petr75 » Sun Sep 09, 2018 6:11 am

2018 Aug 18
The Birchall Centre, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK
Aluminium in Brain Tissue in Multiple Sclerosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30126209

Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a devastating and debilitating neurodegenerative disease of unknown cause. A consensus suggests the involvement of both genetic and environmental factors of which the latter may involve human exposure to aluminium. There are no data on the content and distribution of aluminium in human brain tissue in MS. The aluminium content of brain tissue from 14 donors with a diagnosis of MS was determined by transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The location of aluminium in the brain tissue of two donors was investigated by aluminium-specific fluorescence microscopy. The aluminium content of brain tissue in MS was universally high with many tissues bearing concentrations in excess of 10 μg/g dry wt. (10 ppm) and some exceeding 50 ppm. There were no statistically significant relationships between brain lobes, donor age or donor gender. Aluminium-specific fluorescence successfully identified aluminium in brain tissue in both intracellular and extracellular locations. The association of aluminium with corpora amylacea suggests a role for aluminium in neurodegeneration in MS.
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Re: What Is the Safest Cookware to Use?

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Sep 09, 2018 6:38 am

nice find - hopefully for 'future research' recommendations, the posted study includes some investigation into aluminum interactions with other metals in MS, as has previously been examined in the context of dialysis below.

recalling general-discussion-f1/topic30297.html#p254130

Zinc Supplementation Alters Plasma Aluminum and Selenium Status of Patients Undergoing Dialysis: A Pilot Study (2013)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705357/

After two-month Zn treatment, these patients had higher plasma Zn and Se concentrations, reduced plasma Al concentrations and oxidative stress. Furthermore, increased plasma Zn concentrations were related to the concentrations of Al, Se, oxidative product malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase activities. In conclusion, Zn supplementation ameliorates abnormally high plasma Al concentrations and oxidative stress and improves Se status in long-term dialysis patients.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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