jimmylegs, Help Needed!

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.

Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby THX1138 » Sat Aug 25, 2018 6:36 pm

good re veg. re unclean vs clean, can you post a bullet point list for me? whfoods is a main info source for me and you may already know its author is jewish so i think we're likely partway there. also, now i might be looking into insects for you to eat ;) jk. noted re allergies, preferences or lack thereof and calories.
http://www.uncleanfoodsdietarylaws.com/ ... _list.html

noted. is your help good at persuasion, bullying and/or enforcing food intake? ;) more to follow.
She's working into that role. As with everything she does, I think she will be great at it.


10 mins better than nothing. what are your main barriers to doing more? eg swimming for example, which is particularly good for those of us who deal with balance and heat tolerance issues (i say this already knowing it can suck a bit when getting *out* of the pool and full gravity reality hits again). on the plus side, at least you don't have to worry about athletic nutrient depletion per se.
Main Barrier is not eating enough.
(For the pool) I would have to go across town to get to a pool, plus get in and out of a vehicle and get in and out of the pool building = too much struggle and I don't like chlorine.
I have not experienced heat issues on the XR-6. I also have a good rowing machine; Barrier = legs spread out when I go forward on it. Also, I have a BOSU 3D trainer system which is not set up at this point and a Leverage squat machine for which I need some more strength and flexibility to use. With enough food and the right nutrients, I can later envision myself using all of them!



i need a journal detailing the last three days of whatever you did eat. failing that pls post times and estimated quantities for dietary intakes for today, monday and tuesday. as elsewhere, post in recipe format not menu format pls.
Food Log
Sat 8-18
~ 11am 2oz brisket and 6oz cabbage salad
Peanut Butter sandwich w 2pc bread ~2Tbs Peanut Butter
6pm meatloaf and 6oz cabbage salad, 1 turkey stick

8pm drumstick (ice cream)

9:30 pm smallish banana


Sunday I got up at 2-3pm
5:30 pm
7oz cabbage salad - ,carrot, onionand parsley
8oz meatloaf (carmelized onion and herb THK).
Medium avocado.

11pm small banana. A large bite of meatloaf.


Monday
Noon 2 Tbs Peanut Butter + 2 pieces New England Brown Bread

330pm small banana

8pm
10oz meatloaf, 1/3 plantain from tostones,1/2 cup quacamole.

1140pm 2oz spring mix with some carrot and onion & 2 oz tostones


Tuesday 21st

Noon 2.5 oz tostones
2 turkey sticks
1/2 cup guacamole

430pm
12 oz tacos from "Taco Night"
4oz above salad with spring mix
1/2 cup guacamole

8:30pm 3.7oz tostones
5 Tbs Old Home peanut butter

Tuesday
Taco night ~ 15oz (Meat, plantain, cauliflower rice).
Avocado 1


Wednesday
1pm Taco night & 1cup guacamole & 4ooz spring mix salad

530pm 1 16oz coconut water

7pm -- 4 turkey sticks 15 grams each, 5oz sauteed yellow squash with onion sauteed in c oil, but 1 medium avocado

930pm 2 pc. Bread + 3Tbs PB
6oz cabbag,carrot,onion, parsley salad


Thursday 23rd
925 am --- 1 Tbs PB

1030 2 Gilbert Craft Sausages's, 2 pc bread, cabbage salad

110 pm 6oz cucumber

3pm Greek Gyro & 13 chicken Mcnuggets & 5oz tomato... after which I could feel my heart beating somewhat and I became dry and somewhat weak. I also started clearing my throat as I do after eating often times. yes it definitely dehydrated me later on my eye muscles are tight and are having problem with the coordination of the eyes.

8pm 1can coconut water, 1 chicken nugget

830 4 chicken McNuggets and a large bite of a gyro. now I'm getting noticeably weak again.

915 2oz home grown plum
and one avocado medium.
And the rest of the gyro
1 5oz cucumber


Friday 24th
12pm 6oz cucumber, 6oz tomato, 10 chicken Mcnuggets. Now, after eating, I'm in somewhat of a daze and I am experiencing some weakness.

7:30 15 chicken Mcnuggets, roughly 6oz roasted veges (carrots and parsnips)

830 1/2 lb hamburger sandwich, 3oz cucumber, 3oz tomato

1215 am -- 1 Tbs PB, 1 Chicken Mcnugget

1250am 2oz tostones, 1tsp PB

Saturday the 25th
1:30pm 4oz cucumber, 9 cChicken Mcnuggets, 2oz spring mix salad,

3pm coconut water
440 pm 3 nuggets
7pm 1.5 cups chili with beans & 2pc New England Brown Bread

9pm 3 salmon patties







what about plain old magnesium glycinate, without the bis? also what happened to putting some salt in the water.
I will See about it.




nice. do any include an emphasis on nutrient density?
Yes.
Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook & Action Plan: A Practical Guide to Easing Your Autoimmune Disease Symptoms with Nourishing Food https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/16231 ... UTF8&psc=1

The Paleo Healing Cookbook: Nourishing Recipes for Vibrant Health https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/16241 ... UTF8&psc=1

The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook: An Allergen-Free Approach to Managing Chronic Illness https://www.amazon.com/Autoimmune-Paleo ... TD00V80GR8


The Healing Kitchen https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/16286 ... UTF8&psc=1

first i need the complete current daily supplement regimen pls and thx.

Supplements

Natural Calm - 200mg in 1 gallon water
OptiZinc - 1
Curcumin Phytosome - 2 x 1000mg
Chromium nicotinate glycinate chelate - 200mcg
Fish Oil - 2 x 1000mg
Probiotic 66 billion CFU
Kirkland Daily Multi - 1
Mg Oil - 1 minute treatment about every other day
Vitamin K2 MK-7 - 100mcg every other day
THX1138
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 10:07 am

Diet:
Partially AIP and very inconsistent, such that to describe my diet is impossible. But usually not enough calories and that makes my extremities cold most of the time, in addition to causing low energy and brain fog and worsened muscle spasticity..


i need a journal detailing the last three days of whatever you did eat. failing that pls post times and estimated quantities for dietary intakes for today, monday and tuesday. as elsewhere, post in recipe format not menu format pls.

Sunday

I got up at 2-3pm

5:30 pm
7oz cabbage salad - carrot, onion and parsley
8oz meatloaf (carmelized onion and herb THK).
1 Medium avocado.

11pm
small banana.
large bite of meatloaf.

Monday

Noon
2 Tbs Peanut Butter
2 pieces New England Brown Bread

330pm
small banana

8pm
10oz meatloaf,
1/3 plantain from tostones (fried plantain)
1/2 cup quacamole.

1140pm
2oz spring mix with some carrot and onion
2 oz tostones (fried plantain)

Tuesday

Noon
2.5 oz tostones (fried plantain)
2 turkey sticks
1/2 cup guacamole

430pm
12 oz tacos from "Taco Night" (Meat, plantain, cauliflower rice).
4oz above salad with spring mix
1/2 cup guacamole

8:30pm

3.7oz tostones
5 Tbs Old Home peanut butter

first i need the complete current daily supplement regimen pls and thx.


Supplements

Natural Calm - 200mg in 1 gallon water
OptiZinc - 1
Curcumin Phytosome - 2 x 1000mg
Chromium nicotinate glycinate chelate - 200mcg
Fish Oil - 2 x 1000mg
Probiotic 66 billion CFU
Kirkland Daily Multi - 1
Mg Oil - 1 minute treatment about every other day
Vitamin K2 MK-7 - 100mcg every other day


re diet
make self care your full time job. get up in the morning for work ;)
eat something every 1-2 hours (breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, supper)`
include daily produce, whole grain, and protein including nuts/seeds
prep lasting meals on the weekend for easy access through the week.

re produce - diversify and make an array of veg 40% of each day's intake, and an array of fruits 10%

yesterday i made a lentil/veg soup which will help make lunches easy through the week.
today i will thaw mixed fruit to go with oats for breakfast, for probably 4 days in the week ahead.

re whole grain - routine looks low; diversify and make it 25% of each day's intake
prepare one or more lasting items on sunday to add to your existing whole grain bread

personally i already have brown rice leftovers in the fridge and this aft i will prep steel cut oats for the week's breakfast, plus a quarter box of multigrain fusilli, which will go into a salmon pasta salad (3-4 servings total)

re protein - routine looks high for content, medium for diversity
include both meat & alternatives incl legume/grain combos, eggs, seafood, chicken, red meat.

personally, i often have half servings of animal protein at any one time, and make up the balance with alternatives.

weekend chore pending: trail mix. 1/2 c pumpkin seeds, 1/2 c sunflower seeds, 1/2 c walnuts, 1/2 c cashews, 1/4 c dried cranberries, 1/4 c dark choc coverered cacao nibs, 1/4 c honey flax peanuts. this makes a 1/4 c daily snack which will last me for 11 days.

weekends are also when i tend to have a couple eggs. sometimes i hard boil a couple for use through the week.

right now i am working my way through a chicken breast (it will end up being 3 portions total)

later today i will open a can of salmon to put into a pasta salad (it will end up being 3-4 servings of pasta salad). i am trying to work on diversifying my seafood choices. (ps re the list - finally understand why oysters do not appear in the zinc foods list via whfoods.com!)

personally i aim for one red meat serving per week. last week it was lamb. i don't know what it will be in the week ahead.

re paleo routine
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diet-and ... -stone-age
https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritions ... aleo-diet/
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... eally-eat/

re supplements
not a fan of kirkland any more, if i can't find their product info on their own web site. (and just realized it's kirkMAN i used to be a fan of - have never tried kirkland products)
also, can't see product details for a kirkland multi. too many different ones and i have no idea which is yours
regardless, consider investing in a high quality 3 a day.

looking forward to seeing your test results
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby THX1138 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 1:39 pm

looking forward to seeing your test results
:?: :?:


I payed the $4.99 so I could see the rest of the Harvard article linked above. I thought I might now have an additional source for health info, but upon seeing the incorrect info early on saying that salt is not allowed on Paleo eating plans...
Diet Review: Paleo Diet for Weight Loss
The following is a summary of foods generally permitted on the diet:
Allowed: Fresh lean meats, fish, shellfish, eggs, nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, olive oil, coconut oil, and small amounts of honey. Certain root vegetables like sweet potatoes and cassava may be allowed in moderation because of their high nutrient content.
Not Allowed: Whole grains, cereals, refined grains and sugars, dairy products, beans, white potatoes, legumes (peanuts, beans, lentils), alcohol, coffee, salt, refined vegetable oils such as canola, and most processed foods in general.
Calorie counting and portion sizes are not emphasized. Some plans allow a few “cheat” non-Paleo meals a week, especially when first starting the diet, to improve overall compliance.

Bottom Line
The Paleo diet includes nutrient-dense whole fresh foods and encourages participants to steer away from highly processed foods containing added salt, sugar, and unhealthy fats. However, the omission of whole grains, dairy, and legumes could lead to suboptimal intake of important nutrients. The restrictive nature of the diet may also make it difficult for people to adhere to such a diet in the long run. More high-quality studies including randomized controlled trials with follow-up of greater than one year that compare the Paleo diet with other weight-reducing diets are needed to show a direct health benefit of the Paleo diet. Strong recommendations for the Paleo diet for weight loss cannot be made at this time.
https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritions ... aleo-diet/
...I have my doubts.

Here's another:
The "Paleo Diet" -- Back to the Stone Age?
Without grains, legumes and dairy, vegetarians may be hard pressed to eat enough protein.
This one also says that salt is excluded from Paleo eatong plans.
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diet-and ... -stone-age
:?: :?: Vegetarians :?: :?: Paleo eating plans are certainly not vegetarian. This "point" has nothing to do with Paleo eating.

And the third article linked above from Scientific American seemed to be trying to compare an authentic paleo ancestor with people of today supposedly living a "paleo" lifestyle and showing how that is not desireablw or even possible.

The actual foods eaten (by people on the Paleo eating plans of today) need to be the issue.
The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body
https://www.amazon.com/Paleo-Approach-R ... o+approach
.
The Paleo Approach Cookbook https://www.amazon.com/Paleo-Approach-C ... o+approach


About the Author
Sarah Ballantyne, Ph.D., earned her doctorate degree in medical biophysics at the age of 26. She spent the next four years doing research on innate immunity and inflammation before becoming a stay-at-home mom. After her second daughter was born, she began to experiment with the Paleo lifestyle. It had an amazing effect on her health.

Over time, she healed herself of a long laundry list of physical complaints including irritable bowel syndrome, allergies, and the autoimmune disorder, Lichen Planus, an inflammatory skin condition. Inspired by her success, Dr. Ballantyne created the popular health blog http://www.ThePaleoMom.com and became co-host of a top-rated podcast, The Paleo View. Her passion for providing straightforward explanations of the science behind her diet and lifestyle recommendations for managing autoimmune disease, plus her love of food and cooking as well as her conviction that healing your body does not have to come at the expense of enjoying food, form the foundations of The Paleo Approach and The Paleo Approach Cookbook.

Here is her website: https://www.thepaleomom.com/start-here/
Last edited by THX1138 on Sun Aug 26, 2018 3:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 2:48 pm

take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 2:52 pm

also, thought you still had some test results pending. if not, my bad. i know your zinc and copper came in
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
jimmylegs
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Posts: 11709
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 4:00 pm

Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby THX1138 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 3:52 pm

So, being I am on the AIP partly now and am transitioning to a full AIP eating plan (which is an Elimination Diet), what are your dietary, etc. recommendations :?:

What is the AIP?
The Autoimmune Protocol, or AIP, is a specialized version of the Paleo diet, with an even greater focus on nutrient density and even stricter guidelines for which foods should be eliminated. Foods can be viewed as having two kinds of constituents within them: those that promote health (like nutrients!) and those that undermine health (like inflammatory compounds). (While there are constituents that neither promote nor undermine health, they are not used to evaluate the merit of an individual food.) Some foods are obvious wins for a health-promoting diet because they have tons of beneficial constituents and very few or no constituents that undermine health—good examples of these superfoods are organ meats, seafood, and most vegetables. Other foods are obvious fails because they have a relative lack of health-promoting constituents and are rife with problematic compounds—good examples are gluten-containing grains, peanuts, and most soy products. But many foods fall into the amorphous world of gray in between these two extremes. Tomatoes, for example, have some exciting nutrients, but they also contain several compounds that are so effective at stimulating the immune system that they have been investigated for use in vaccines as adjuvants (the chemicals in vaccines that enhance your immune response to whatever you’re getting immunized against). The biggest difference between a standard Paleo diet and the Autoimmune Protocol is where we draw the line between “yes” foods and “no” foods in order to get more health-promoting compounds and fewer detrimental compounds in our diet. Those who are typically quite healthy can tolerate less-optimal foods than those who aren’t. You can think of the Autoimmune Protocol as a pickier version of the Paleo diet; it accepts only those foods that are clear winners.

As such, the Autoimmune Protocol places greater emphasis on the most nutrient-dense foods in our food supply, including organ meat, seafood, and vegetables. And the Autoimmune Protocol eliminates foods allowed on the typical Paleo diet that have compounds that may stimulate the immune system or harm the gut environment, including nightshades (like tomatoes and peppers), eggs, nuts, seeds, and alcohol. The goal of the Autoimmune Protocol is to flood the body with nutrients while simultaneously avoiding any food that might be contributing to disease (or at the very least interfering with our efforts to heal). It is an elimination diet strategy, cutting out the foods that are most likely to be holding back our health. After a period of time, many of the excluded foods, especially those that have nutritional merit despite also containing some (but not too much) potentially detrimental compounds, can be reintroduced.

While the Paleo diet is sometimes labeled as a fad diet, its health benefits are supported by scientific research. The body of research pitting Paleo against other dietary strategies is in its infancy, but the studies that have been performed uniformly support Paleo. They prove that it beats out other recommended diets, even the Mediterranean diet, for weight loss, management of diabetes, improvement of cardiovascular disease risk factors, and reversal of metabolic syndrome. Studies have also shown that it has therapeutic potential for the debilitating autoimmune disease secondary progressing multiple sclerosis. And while anecdotal stories cannot be used to validate any dietary approach, the tens of thousands (and counting!) of people who have successfully used variations of the Paleo diet, including the Autoimmune Protocol, to mitigate and even completely reverse their diseases is compelling. See Paleo Diet Clinical Trials and Studies.

In a recent study, fifteen patients with active inflammatory bowel disease were placed on the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol following a 6-week gradual transition followed by a 5-week maintenance phase. (In fact, patients were given my first book, The Paleo Approach, as a resource for following the protocol.) Clinical remission was achieved by week 6 in eleven of the fifteen participants (73%!!), and they stayed in remission throughout the 5-week maintenance phase of the study.
https://www.thepaleomom.com/start-here/ ... -protocol/

How Does The Autoimmune Protocol Work?
The Paleo Autoimmune Protocol works by addressing four key areas known to be important contributors to chronic and autoimmune diseases. Drawing on insights gleaned from more than 1,200 scientific studies, these diet and lifestyle recommendations specifically target:

Nutrient density. The immune system (and indeed every system in the body) requires an array of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, essential fatty acids, and amino acids to function normally. Micronutrient deficiencies and imbalances are key players in the development and progression of autoimmune disease. Focusing on consuming the most nutrient-dense foods available enables a synergistic surplus of micronutrients to correct both deficiencies and imbalances, thus supporting regulation of the immune system, hormone systems, detoxification systems, and neurotransmitter production. A nutrient-dense diet further provides the building blocks that the body needs to heal damaged tissues.
Gut health. Gut dysbiosis and leaky gut are key facilitators in the development of autoimmune disease. The foods recommended on the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol support the growth of healthy levels and a healthy variety of gut microorganisms. Foods that irritate or damage the lining of the gut are avoided, while foods that help restore gut barrier function and promote healing are endorsed.
Hormone regulation. What we eat, when we eat, and how much we eat affect a variety of hormones that interact with the immune system. When dietary factors (like eating too much sugar or grazing rather than eating larger meals spaced farther apart) dysregulate these hormones, the immune system is directly affected (typically stimulated). The Paleo Autoimmune Protocol diet is designed to promote regulation of these hormones, thereby regulating the immune system by proxy. These and other essential hormones that impact the immune system are also profoundly affected by how much sleep we get, how much time we spend outside, how much and what kinds of activity we get, and how well we reduce and manage stress.
Immune system regulation. Immune regulation is achieved by restoring a healthy diversity and healthy amounts of gut microorganisms, restoring the barrier function of the gut, providing sufficient amounts of the micronutrients required for the immune system to function normally, and regulating the key hormones that in turn regulate the immune system.
Inflammation is a factor in all chronic illnesses, and this is one area where the foods we eat can make a huge difference. In some cases, an immune system that isn’t regulating itself properly directly causes the illness; in others, inflammation is merely an element of the illness or a contributor to how the illness came about—but it is always a player and a problem. What this means is that reducing inflammation and giving the immune system the resources it needs, as well as the opportunity to regulate itself, can help in every single chronic illness. This is important because inflammation is strongly influenced by what we eat, how well we sleep, how stressed we are, and how active we are. And this is why chronic illness can respond so positively to changes in diet and lifestyle.

Food has therapeutic potential for every chronic illness—but that’s not the same thing as calling food a cure. Depending on the illness you’re struggling with, how long you’ve had it, how aggressive the disease is, and what confounding factors you’re dealing with, dietary changes may get you as far as a complete reversal of your disease, or they may slow the progress of your illness, or they may simply improve your quality of life. These are all successes worth celebrating. Good food may not be the miracle cure you’re hoping for, but it’s pretty darn powerful all the same.
https://www.thepaleomom.com/start-here/ ... -protocol/

As you adopt the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol, your food choices become focused on consuming the nutrients to support this healing—foods that provide everything your body needs to stop attacking itself, repair damaged tissues, and get healthy again: proteins, carbohydrates, and fats to sustain a normal metabolism, build new tissue, and produce hormones, important proteins, and signaling molecules; and the full range of fat-soluble vitamins, water-soluble vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants to get rid of inflammation, regulate the immune system, and support the normal functioning of all the body’s systems.



What To Eat and What To Avoid
Following the AIP diet involves increasing your intake of nutrient-dense, health-promoting foods while avoiding foods that may be triggers for your disease.

In summary, the rules of what to eat are:

organ meat and offal (aim for 5 times per week, the more the better)–read more here.
fish and shellfish (wild is best, but farmed is fine) (aim for at least 3 times per week, the more the better)–read more here and here.
vegetables of all kinds, as much variety as possible and the whole rainbow, aim for 8-14 cups per day
Green vegetables
Colorful vegetables and fruit (red, purple, blue, yellow, orange, white)
Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, kale, turnips, arugula, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, watercress, mustard greens, etc.)
Sea vegetables (excluding algae like chlorella and spirulina which are immune stimulators)
Edible Fungi, like mushrooms
herbs and spices
quality meats (grass-fed, pasture-raised, wild as much as possible) (poultry in moderation due to high omega-6 content unless you are eating a ton of fish)
healthy fats (pasture-raised/grass-fed animal fats [rendered or as part of your meat], fatty fish, olive oil, avocado oil, coconut oil, palm oil[not palm kernel])
fruit (keeping fructose intake between 10g and 40g daily-note that 20g is probably optimal)
probiotic/fermented foods (fermented vegetables or fruit, kombucha, water kefir, coconut milk kefir, coconut milk yogurt, supplements)–read about them here and here.
glycine-rich foods (anything with connective tissue, joints or skin, organ meat, and bone broth)
Source the best-quality ingredients you can.
Eat as much variety as possible.
https://www.thepaleomom.com/start-here/ ... -protocol/

In addition, remove the following from your diet:

Grains
Legumes
Dairy
Refined and processed sugars and oils
Eggs (especially the whites)
Nuts (including nut butters, flours and oils)
Seeds (including seed oil, cocoa, coffee and seed-based spices)
Nightshades (potatoes [sweet potatoes are fine], tomatoes, eggplants, sweet and hot peppers, cayenne, red pepper, tomatillos, goji berries etc. and spices derived from peppers, including paprika)
Potential Gluten Cross-Reactive Foods
Alcohol
NSAIDS (like aspirin or ibuprofen)
Non-nutritive sweeteners (yes, all of them, even stevia)
Emulsifiers, thickeners, and other food additives
https://www.thepaleomom.com/start-here/ ... -protocol/
Last edited by THX1138 on Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:13 pm

any undergrad paper that talks about 'studies' without specific citations loses marks.

some homework: list your personal daily dietary requirement in milligrams of calcium, magnesium and zinc. provide sources to justify your numbers for each essential nutrient.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby THX1138 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:17 pm

some homework: list your personal daily dietary requirement in milligrams of calcium, magnesium and zinc. provide sources to justify your numbers for each essential nutrient.

That's part of what I came to you for.
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:31 pm

handy that's what we're working on then, isn't it! the info i've asked you for is readily available to everyone. dri tables, if you need a hint. happy hunting :)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby THX1138 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:37 pm

RHR: Debunking Paleo Diet Myths—with Sarah Ballantyne

Paleo Principles: The Science Behind the Paleo Template, Step-by-Step Guides, Meal Plans, and 200+ Healthy & Delicious Recipes for Real Life
https://www.amazon.com/Paleo-Principles ... hrikres-20
Editorial Reviews
Review
If you want to restore your digestive health, balance hormones, and support your immune system, then Paleo Principles is the book for you. Dr. Ballantyne offers the latest medical research, nutrition advice, and Paleo recipes to transform your health. She has created a comprehensive and well-researched guide to better health through nutrition and lifestyle. Not only will Paleo Principles help you reach your health goals, but it will most likely have you feeling better than ever before.

Josh Axe, DNM, CNS, DC, founder of DrAxe.com, bestselling author of Eat Dirt and co-founder of Ancient Nutrition

Twenty years ago the Paleo diet had a few review papers or references in anthropology books and papers. Many detractors cited a “lack of research” to support the Paleo diet/Ancestral health template. That story has changed. We now have well-conducted human trails on a host of different topics, with a consistent theme which paints the Paleo diet as safe, effective, and beneficial over the long haul. There are still detractors who cite a paucity of research, but we now have Dr. Sarah Ballantyne’s Magnum Opus, Paleo Principles, which compiles and puts into context the vast body of research which now encompasses the Paleo diet.

Robb Wolf, New York Times bestselling author of The Paleo Solution and Wired to Eat

Reading Paleo Principles is like having a heart-to-heart with one of the world’s foremost experts on health in your kitchen—not only does Dr. Ballantyne take the time to thoroughly explain the science behind the Paleo template, but her understanding and compassion shine through in her writing. With this book, not only will you find answers to your health challenges, but an ally for your health journey.

Izabella Wentz, PharmD, FASCP, pharmacist and New York Times bestselling author of Hashimoto's Protocol

In Paleo Principles, Dr. Ballantyne lays the complete scientific foundation for the Paleo lifestyle while providing a huge collection of practical tips, visual guides, delicious recipes, and meal plans. Her book is a complete guide to achieving your best health.

Chris Kresser MS, LAc, New York Times bestselling author of The Paleo Cure

Sarah Ballantyne’s brilliant new book—packed with science, easy-to-follow advice, and luscious recipes— holds all the answers you need to go from overweight, overmedicated, and fatigued to slim, energetic, and healthy. If you’re ready to change your life, read this book now.

Kellyann Petrucci, MD, New York Times bestselling author, Dr. Kellyann’s Bone Broth Diet, and host of the PBS special 21 Days to a Slimmer, Younger You

Crack open this encyclopedic tome, which answers more questions in its jam-packed pages than you ever thought to ask about diet, lifestyle, and health. Sarah’s exhaustive, all-in-one textbook for Paleo living leaves no stone unturned!

Michelle Tam, New York Times bestselling cookbook author and creator of Nom Nom Paleo
About the Author
Sarah Ballantyne, PhD, earned her doctorate degree in medical biophysics from the University of Western Ontario at age 26. She spent the next four years doing research on innate immunity, inflammation, critical care medicine, gene therapy, and epithelial cell biology at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, and at the University of Arizona before becoming a stay-at-home mom, a decision motivated largely by her poor health at the time.

After her second daughter was born, Dr. Ballantyne began to experiment with the Paleo lifestyle. It had an amazing effect on her health, contributing to her 120-pound weight loss. Over time, she healed herself of a laundry list of physical complaints, including irritable bowel syndrome, acid reflux, migraines, anxiety, asthma, allergies, psoriasis, and the autoimmune skin condition lichen planus.

Inspired by her success, Dr. Ballantyne created the popular and award-winning health blog http://www.ThePaleoMom.com and became co-host of a top-rated syndicated podcast, The Paleo View. Together, her passion for providing straightforward explanations of the science behind her diet and lifestyle recommendations for managing autoimmune disease and her conviction that healing your body does not have to come at the expense of enjoying food form the foundation of her books, The Paleo Approach and The Paleo Approach Cookbook.
Last edited by THX1138 on Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
THX1138
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:53 pm

re the first non-link non-citation
https://chriskresser.com/debunking-pale ... allantyne/

"Comments
Christopher Grove
JULY 8, 2018 AT 10:48 AM

Ugh!! I’m SO tired of Sarah’s book being referred to as some kind of scientific tome. There is ONE chapter that has a series of study references in regards to the paleo diet and how it can influence specific illnesses like diabetes or MS. HOWEVER, the book is FULL of references to so-called studies WITHOUT CITATIONS! So, apparently I’m supposed to simply take Sarah’s word for it that eating over 20gr per day of nuts and seeds increases risk for stroke (or any number of other out of context references).
Paleo Principles LOOKS like a college textbook but I can’t recommend it to anyone who expects scientific proof of anything but the value of Paleo in general terms for disease mitigation.
On top of that it seems that the paleo rat pack is out to give each other unqualified accolades in order to sell each others’ books.
As someone who tries to promote a Paleo Diet & lifestyle that is a horrible position to be in when confronted with someone convinced of another, unscientific, dietary or medical way of life!"

you go, grove
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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jimmylegs
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby THX1138 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:58 pm

jimmylegs wrote:handy that's what we're working on then, isn't it! the info i've asked you for is readily available to everyone. dri tables, if you need a hint. happy hunting :)
OK, so the info I need
is
readily available to everyone.
Is that what I came to the great JL for ? Maybe, but I came requesting help from someone who I know to be extremely knowledgeable.

You did have some good advice for me in your earlier post. Thanks :-D
THX1138
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:00 pm

i'm growing your investigative skill set. if googling dri tables is beyond you, i don't think i'll be able to help.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
jimmylegs
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby THX1138 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:29 pm

i'm growing your investigative skill set.
...
Investigative skills are great...Especially if you have the health to use them. When you're doing as poorly as I am you are not much into schooling.

Right now, as I had previously stated, I am in dire straights and I do believe I will end up in a nursing home soon if things don't turn around.
I am getting so bad that I think I will probably end up in a nursing home this year. That would be the end of me.


What I asked for is advice for my situation (within the AIP diet context), not learning about learning, good as it is.
THX1138
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Re: JL, Help Needed!

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:33 pm

all right i am not your person for help with AIP. you give evidence of being able to find the things you want to find, in spite of your condition. i hope it works for you :)
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
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