2018 study: long-term air pollution exposure & MS incidence

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.

2018 study: long-term air pollution exposure & MS incidence

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Sep 30, 2018 5:09 am

Long-term exposure to air pollution and the incidence of multiple sclerosis: A population-based cohort study
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 5118303013

Highlights
• No associations of MS incidence with PM2.5 and NO2 were observed.
•There was a tendency for increasing MS incidence in relation to O3.
•Females exhibited a higher risk of developing MS in association with O3 than males.

Abstract
Background
Evidence of the adverse neurological effects of exposure to ambient air pollution is emerging, but little is known about its effect on the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common autoimmune disease of the central nervous system.

Objectives
To investigate the associations between MS incidence and long-term exposures to fine particles (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3)

Methods
We conducted a population-based cohort study to investigate the associations between long-term exposures to PM2.5, NO2, and O3 and the incidence of MS. Our study population included all Canadian-born residents aged 20–40 years who lived in the province of Ontario, Canada from 2001 to 2013. Incident MS was ascertained from a validated registry. We assigned estimates of annual concentrations of these pollutants to the residential postal codes of subjects for each year during the 13 years of follow-up. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each pollutant separately using random-effects Cox proportional hazards models. We conducted various sensitivity analyses, such as lagging exposure up to 5 years and adjusting for access to neurological care, annual average temperature, and population density.

Results
Between 2001 and 2013, we identified 6203 incident cases of MS. The adjusted HR of incident MS was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.86–1.07) for PM2.5, 0.91(95% CI: 0.81–1.02) for NO2, and 1.09 (95% CI: 0.98–1.23) for O3. These results were robust to various sensitivity analyses conducted.

Conclusions
In this large population-based cohort, we did not observe significant associations between MS incidence and long-term exposures to PM2.5, NO2, and O3 in adults in Ontario, 2001–2013.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 11770
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm

Advertisement

Re: 2018 study: long-term air pollution exposure & MS incide

Postby Petr75 » Sun Sep 30, 2018 7:55 am

Yes, it may be the end of the theory. general-discussion-f1/topic28652-30.html#p253857
User avatar
Petr75
Family Elder
 
Posts: 121
Joined: Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:17 am
Location: Czech Republic

Re: 2018 study: long-term air pollution exposure & MS incide

Postby jimmylegs » Sun Sep 30, 2018 10:41 am

i was interested in the age range the authors selected, also that they cut off analysis before coal plants were shut down locally. many fewer smog days (ie 0) from 2014 onwards, but who knows if that would affect the analysis where ms incidence is concerned.
take control of your own health
pursue optimal self care at least as actively as a diagnosis
ask for referrals to preventive health care specialists eg dietitians
don't let suboptimal self care muddy any underlying diagnostic picture!
User avatar
jimmylegs
Volunteer Moderator
 
Posts: 11770
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 3:00 pm


Return to General Discussion

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service