Parasitic infection is found to benefit MS patients

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Postby Lyon » Sun Aug 16, 2009 9:24 am

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Combination of two hypotheses

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:26 am

In my continuing effort to understand how hyperinsulinemia can explain facts and other hypotheses of MS, I put this idea before you:

What do helminths eat? I know that glucose (blood sugar) is a food source for bacteria; I would assume that the same applies to helminths. If so, they would effectively reduce the glucose level in the body; an increased glucose level triggers an increase in insulin production, a reduction in glucose should elicit a corresponding reduction in insulin. Therefore, wouldn't helminths indirectly be reducing the insulin level?

In addition to a modern, developed-country diet higher in carbohydrates (which increase glucose), the disappearance of helminths may cause higher glucose levels. Both would lead to excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia).
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Postby Lyon » Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:38 am

oo
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Postby Terry » Sun Aug 16, 2009 12:56 pm

Pathogenesis. The hookworm and an American hookworm are localised in a thin intestine, mainly in duodenal and lean intestines. Larvas of hookworms get to an organism of the master mainly through a mouth and educe in an intestine without migration. American hookworm larvas usually take root activly through a skin, inpour into vascular capillars, migrate on the big and small circles of a circulation. Having reached lungs, through pneumatic pathes, a larynx and a pharynx they get to an esophagus and an intestine where in 4-5 weeks educe in adults of helminths. Parasitizing in an intestine, helminths eat basically blood, putting to an intestine mucosa fine wounds by chitinous arms of a stomatic capsule. In head and cervical parts there are glands which excrete the special anticoagulants which cause a long bleeding. The intensive invasion, especially at children's and young age, can lead to a delay in physical and mental development, to attrition and a cachexia. Quite often in these cases the invasion comes to an end with a lethal outcome. Lifetime of helminths, possibly, 3-5 years, probably, more longly. The majority of Ancylostoma perishes in 1-2 years after penetration into a body of the human.
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On helminths

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Aug 16, 2009 4:04 pm

It seems to me that the information Terry posted could explain a factoid I have read (although I cannot produce a reference to published evidence): some people with MS report an improvement in symptoms after donating blood (The Red Cross began accepting such donations again some time ago.).

Thank you to all who contribute to this mental exercise and discussion.
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Postby jimmylegs » Sun Aug 16, 2009 4:38 pm

they accept blood donations from ppl with ms??!!
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Postby Lyon » Sun Aug 16, 2009 5:48 pm

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Blood donations

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Aug 16, 2009 7:11 pm

I am QUITE sure there was an item in an NMSS publication that stated the Red Cross was now accepting blood donations from people with MS. A call to the MS Society should be able to confirm this.
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Postby Lyon » Sun Aug 16, 2009 7:16 pm

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Postby lyndacarol » Sun Aug 16, 2009 7:55 pm

Look what I found, compliments of Scoobyjude, November 15, 2007:
I know that this question has been asked before so I thought I'd post an answer. According to the newest issue of the NMSS magazine the Red Cross now accepts blood from those dxed with MS since there is no evidence it is trasmitted via blood. It also says that most medications taken for chronic illnesses won't disqualify a donor. Just thought I'd share.


http://www.thisisms.com/ftopic-4716-previous.html

Perhaps that will give you more clues to help find the article, Lyon.
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Postby Lyon » Sun Aug 16, 2009 7:59 pm

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Postby turtle_fi » Mon Aug 17, 2009 2:38 pm

Lyon wrote:I'll help look but I thought we discussed this about a year and some states were and some states weren't accepting blood.


really red cross accepting blood donations from people with ms? i was so sad i had to stop donating, since my blood is of popular O brand, but in Finland, they don't accept my blood.

Visits to other countries by normal blood-donating people also prohibit donating for a few months (e.g. going to US, was it 3 months break or so before you can donate again)
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Postby Terry » Mon Aug 17, 2009 3:08 pm

Going CCSVI'ish on you.
Maybe this is one reason that parasitic infections are helpful to MSers.
In head and cervical parts there are glands which excrete the special anticoagulants which cause a long bleeding.
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