negative oligoclonal bands

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Postby Lyon » Sun Feb 25, 2007 4:16 pm

thinkingoutloud86 wrote:what i am more referring to now is if you have a lesion (albeit, one that maybe isn't active) and the cns heats up...is the autoimmune system drawn to the cns and the lesion that is already there (in an effort to deal with it)...as i've said, i have nothing to base this on besides speculation.
Man, I wish I had something meaningful to add to that because it does lead one to wonder. A little earlier you summed the situation very well
how much we don't know about MS (even by the most renowned experts)
.
When I run into these kinds of currently unknowable questions I have to distance myself by considering the imminent improvements around the corner and comfort myself that at that point the answers to multitudes of questions like these are going to seem immaterial....we will no longer have need to care.

Not that your question isn't a good one, and maybe along the way there has been a study using MRI to determine if exercise leads to exacerbation. I never cease to be amazed by the brainiacs around this place who can randomly pull obscure studies like that out of their kiester :lol: I personally have a hard time just keeping track of my car keys :(

I'd be interested to see such a study......After they wipe it off of course!

Bob
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Postby scoobyjude » Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:29 pm

Bob and TOL, I don't have any study info just my own experiences. I have found that when I really get into an exercise program, I tend to overdue it. I exercise everyday and hard. This has caused my symptoms to flare in my right leg quite often. It usually lasts for about a week but I wouldn't say it causes an exacerbation just worsening of old symptoms. I did however have that one exacerbation after an exercise injury so because of all this, I am kind of afraid to exercise. I know it's good for me but I don't trust my body. It sucks cause I'm now about 30 lbs more than I'd like to be. Most of it I've gained after I started Rebif. So I've bought an elliptical machine because I was told it was a lot less stress on the joints. I'm hoping to start another exercise program soon so I'll let you know how it goes.
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Postby Lyon » Sun Feb 25, 2007 6:39 pm

Hi Scooby,
I've bought an elliptical machine because I was told it was a lot less stress on the joints. I'm hoping to start another exercise program soon so I'll let you know how it goes.
No, you can't store it at my house! The cobwebby weight bench, weights, mini trampoline and, I must admit, Cadillac of walking machines, already take up far too much space.
I have found that when I really get into an exercise program, I tend to overdue it. I exercise everyday and hard. This has caused my symptoms to flare in my right leg quite often. It usually lasts for about a week but I wouldn't say it causes an exacerbation just worsening of old symptoms.
I don't mean to downplay this, but I'm curious.
just worsening of old symptoms
Does that mean there is something progressive about it or the symptoms go away and in the long run you're no worse for wear?

Bob
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Postby scoobyjude » Sun Feb 25, 2007 9:25 pm

Believe me this isn't the first exercise equipment I've bought either. I'm still looking for the machine that does the exercise for you while you sleep :lol:

I usually have the leg problems for a week or so and then back to normal. Whether it is progressive or has caused lasting damage, I don't know. Let me explain what I mean about leg problems. My right leg has been affected everytime I have had a relapse. So when I say my old symptoms worsening, it can be in a number of ways. Sometimes it's stiffness, sometimes tingling and sometimes it's a little off balance. None of these are to any degree that I experienced during my relapses. The thing is that these are also problems you can get from exercising without MS so I don't really know for sure what causes them. I just assume it's because I already have an underlying weakness in my right leg and hard exercising triggers it. Hopefully that's all there is to it.
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Postby thinkingoutloud86 » Mon Feb 26, 2007 1:10 am

Lyon and Judie-

It's interesting how one topic turns into something else important. I don't know if this is old news or any help, but when others have suggested exercising, i've often heard about swimming. Not only is it good cardio, supposedly the cool water helps to keep the body temp down....this thread has made me think again about working out. I think I'll give it a shot tomorrow. Anyways, thanks for all of the input.

TOL
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Postby Muu » Wed Feb 28, 2007 3:29 am

Heat and MS? One thing that sprang to mind is the following- women have a far greater incidence of ms than men. Women's body temperature increases as part of the menstrual cycle prior to/ during ovulation. Menopausal hot flushes need no explanation. Possible link? Just a thought.
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Postby Manchester » Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:27 am

There does appear to be a link between rigorous exercise in heat and the BBB permeability. See below, second link, it also suggests that good fluid intake during exercise limits this. Though if this would make someone more likely to relapse is a different issue, it definitely wouldn't seem a good idea to take the chance if you are already having a relapse!

However, up to now there doesn't look like much research is specifically geared towards this vis a vis MS. See below first link

Excercise and heat are thought to cause-sometimes- a temporary worsening of symptoms (not contributing to new ones but awakening old ones, just as fatigue can do) because of a 'conduction block' that results from becoming overheated, nothing seems to relate this to BBB allowing immune cells through.

Studies in this 'conduction block' theory seem more abundant when related to people with mild or moderate MS and it seems to say that the benefits outway the negatives. I guess it all means to take care you don't overheat but otherwise it could be more beneficial than harmful. But I can definitely understand why you are so cautious as there is very limited information on this. Manchester

http://tinyurl.com/yugvl5
Exercise and multiple sclerosis: physiological, psychological, and quality of life issues.Sutherland G, Andersen MB.
School of Human Movement, Recreation and Performance, Victoria University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia. georgina.sutherland@students.vu.edu.au

The case for the benefits of physical activity has been well documented in healthy individuals, and the potential for reducing the risk of mental and physical ill health is substantial. Yet, individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) have long been advised to avoid participation in exercise in order to minimise the risk of exacerbations and symptoms of fatigue. There is, however, increasing interest in how acute and chronic exercise affect physiological and psychological functioning in MS. Much of the research has examined physiological tolerance to exercise and focused on responses in terms of heart rate, blood pressure, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle function, and symptom stability. Little research has focused on understanding how exercise affects psychosocial functioning and brings about changes in depression, affect, mood, well-being, and quality of life. This paper provides a summary of the research exploring the efficacy of physical activity for people with MS. In addition, the key issues that face clinical practice are examined, and considerations for research are discussed.



http://tinyurl.com/27y2l7

Exercise in the heat: effect of fluid ingestion on blood-brain barrier permeability.Watson P, Black KE, Clark SC, Maughan RJ.
School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, United Kingdom. p.watson2@lboro.ac.uk

INTRODUCTION: This study examined changes in serum S100beta concentration, a peripheral marker of BBB permeability, in response to exercise in the heat with and without fluid ingestion. METHODS: Eight physically active males completed up to 90 min of intermittent exercise at a power output corresponding to 55% VO2peak in a warm environment (35 degrees C, 56% rh). Trials were completed with (F trial) and without (NF trial) the replacement of sweat losses. During the fluid trial, an aliquot of plain water was ingested at 15-min intervals to match the volume of sweat lost during the previous period of exercise. RESULTS: Exercise time was 80.7 +/- 13.0 min in the NF trial and 85.1 +/- 9.5 min in the F trial (P = 0.107). Fluid ingestion resulted in a smaller rise in core temperature (P = 0.050) and heart rate (P = 0.027) during the latter stages of exercise. Serum S100beta concentrations were 0.08 +/- 0.02 microg.L at rest, increasing to 0.20 +/- 0.06 microg.L at the end of exercise in the NF trial, with this response attenuated by the ingestion of fluid (0.13 +/- 0.03 microg.L; P = 0.046). Both serum sodium concentration (P < 0.001) and serum osmolality (P = 0.003) were significantly lower at the end of exercise in the F trial than in the NF trial. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrate that water ingestion can limit exercise-induced increases in serum S100beta, consistent with the preservation of BBB integrity. It is possible that this response was mediated through the maintenance of lower extracellular osmolality late in exercise, thus potentially limiting the osmotically driven movement of fluid across the BBB.
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