MS and NO2

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MS and NO2

Postby Kev » Wed Jun 20, 2007 5:06 am

Does anyone have info on the possible effect of Nitric Oxide supplements on MS?
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Postby Wonderfulworld » Thu Jun 21, 2007 4:50 am

Hi Kev and welcome
I've only ever heard of Nitric Oxide in a negative sense to MS - implicated in a possible cause of relapses.
Never heard of taking it as a supplement...
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Postby Kev » Thu Jun 21, 2007 5:20 am

Thanks for the welcome. I take the NO when I work out in the gym, since it seems to help with recovery.
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Postby TwistedHelix » Thu Jun 21, 2007 6:41 am

Hello Kev, and welcome to the gang!
As WW says, NO has historically been implicated in the process of damage during MS activity. If you take a look at the link below you'll see the consensus of opinion, (even though they are all from 2003, I don't think the position has changed):
http://lansbury.bwh.harvard.edu/ms_and_nitric_oxide.htm

Peroxynitrite is a derivative of NO and directly causes damage. It is scavenged by uric acid, and uric acid is known to be generally low in MS sufferers. I take Inosine as a supplement to increase my uric acid levels, and although you can find Inosine as an ingredient in some body building preparations, I'm not sure it will be enough to counteract any additional NO you may be taking,
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Postby Kev » Thu Jun 21, 2007 8:22 am

Thanks to all. I'll never take the stuff again!
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Postby jimmylegs » Thu Jun 21, 2007 2:41 pm

yea sounds like a great idea, kev. i even have a note to file with my dentist too, no laughing gas please and thank you!
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Postby Wonderfulworld » Fri Jun 22, 2007 2:17 am

Hey Kev
just thought of something else that u might find interesting.

I take alpha-lipoic acid and n-acetyl-n-carnitine, both of which are antioxidants and have shown some signs of helping fatigue and ms activity in limited studies - I'm sure one of the info-whizzes on the site will dredge up the references for you! :lol:

I also train regularly and I don't know if these things help at all, or if I'm going through a good phase physically of MS that would have happened anyway, but that's working well for me at the moment.

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Re: MS and NO

Postby NHE » Sun Jun 24, 2007 4:29 pm

jimmylegs wrote:yea sounds like a great idea, kev. i even have a note to file with my dentist too, no laughing gas please and thank you!

Laughing gas is nitrous oxide which has a chemical formula of N2O. That's a different molecule from nitric oxide or NO. In addition, NO2 given in the original subject for this thread is the formula for nitrogen dioxide, a toxic reddish brown gas which is a component of photochemical smog (note that NO2 is also the chemical formula for nitrite but this has a different chemical structure in the arrangement of its electrons). Now that we've cleared up that bit of confusion, it may still be a good idea to avoid nitrous oxide as it's listed as an oxidizing agent (that's why it's used in race car engines so that more fuel can be burned).

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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jun 26, 2007 10:10 am

haha, thanks for clearing that up NHE :) i've just been trying to stay away from anything with and N or an O. stupid air's been a bit of a stumper so far ;)

nitrous oxide can contribute to b12 deficiency which can cause spinal lesions similar to those seen in ms patients - and i have a long relationship with b12 deficiency so that's why i try to avoid it.
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Postby jimmylegs » Tue Jun 26, 2007 1:51 pm

interesting, was just having a think about magnesium and ran across this:

Med Hypotheses. 2001 Feb;56(2):163-70.
The multifaceted and widespread pathology of magnesium deficiency.Johnson S.
sjohnson@qwksilvr.com

Even though Mg is by far the least abundant serum electrolyte, it is extremely important for the metabolism of Ca, K, P, Zn, Cu, Fe, Na, Pb, Cd, HCl, acetylcholine, and nitric oxide (NO), for many enzymes, for the intracellular homeostasis and for activation of thiamine and therefore, for a very wide gamut of crucial body functions. Unfortunately, Mg absorption and elimination depend on a very large number of variables, at least one of which often goes awry, leading to a Mg deficiency that can present with many signs and symptoms. Mg absorption requires plenty of Mg in the diet, Se, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamins B6 and D. Furthermore, it is hindered by excess fat. On the other hand, Mg levels are decreased by excess ethanol, salt, phosphoric acid (sodas) and coffee intake, by profuse sweating, by intense, prolonged stress, by excessive menstruation and vaginal flux, by diuretics and other drugs and by certain parasites (pinworms). The very small probability that all the variables affecting Mg levels will behave favorably, results in a high probability of a gradually intensifying Mg deficiency. It is highly regrettable that the deficiency of such an inexpensive, low-toxicity nutrient result in diseases that cause incalculable suffering and expense throughout the world. The range of pathologies associated with Mg deficiency is staggering: hypertension (cardiovascular disease, kidney and liver damage, etc.), peroxynitrite damage (migraine, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, etc.), recurrent bacterial infection due to low levels of nitric oxide in the cavities (sinuses, vagina, middle ear, lungs, throat, etc.), fungal infections due to a depressed immune system, thiamine deactivation (low gastric acid, behavioral disorders, etc.), premenstrual syndrome, Ca deficiency (osteoporosis, hypertension, mood swings, etc.), tooth cavities, hearing loss, diabetes type II, cramps, muscle weakness, impotence (lack of NO), aggression (lack of NO), fibromas, K deficiency (arrhythmia, hypertension, some forms of cancer), Fe accumulation, etc. Finally, because there are so many variables involved in the Mg metabolism, evaluating the effect of Mg in many diseases has frustrated many researchers who have simply tried supplementation with Mg, without undertaking the task of ensuring its absorption and preventing excessive elimination, rendering the study of Mg deficiency much more difficult than for most other nutrients.
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