Hey Gang....

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.

Hey Gang....

Postby cheerleader » Sat Feb 09, 2008 6:06 pm

Because I wanted to chill out, and give the boards some space from my ramblings (SO sorry about the whole pork thing :oops: )

I am now writing my l-o-n-g, involved, sometimes off topic musings down in a journal. If anyone is so inclined, hop on over to the journals and check it out-

http://www.thisisms.com/journal-display-jid-381.html

This way I'll free up space in my brain for more productive thoughts, and space on the boards for more helpful conversations.

best,
AC
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Stress, HPA Hyperactivity and Neurodegeneration

Postby Shayk » Tue Feb 12, 2008 6:51 pm

Hi AC

I checked out your journal. I think "HPA Activity" and MS is a relevant topic--as are things to help manage stress, such as Yoga.

Thought you (and anyone interested in stress and MS) might be interested in this video by Robert Sapolsky:Stress, Neurodegeneration and Individual Differences

It's not specific to MS, but does talk about hippocampal atrophy and glutamate toxicity (both associated with MS) and offered up a new concept for me, that of "neuronal endangerment". I'd always sort of imagined that the glutamate toxicity from cortisol contributed to offing our neurons and axons but the idea of "neuronal endangerment" from high levels of cortisol might just help explain some of the individual variability in MS--we're all endangered by the high cortisol levels but at the same time possess other unique factors that impact each of us differently.

Anyway, fair warning, it's a long video (1 hr. 20 min.), not professionally taped and ends rather abruptly--seemingly without a conclusion, but I think Sapolsky is one of the experts in this area and there's lots of interesting info.

Sharon
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Postby cheerleader » Wed Feb 13, 2008 2:03 pm

Thanks so much for sharing this, Sharon! Enjoyed listening to Sapolsky this morning. His research is fascinating, it made me want to go back to school. I took copious notes for my own research pile.

I think this is recommended watching/listening for all MSers and caregivers, since he deals with the neuronal effects of chronic stress and elevated glutocorticoids.

I loved his primate study results, showing the psychological stressors which can create a rise in glucocorticoids in the brain, and his recommendations for any of us that might be creating our own stressful responses to situations. (The chronic high stress response of female primates in a male dominated society made me go "hmmmm.....") My own dealings with post traumatic stress syndrome after the Loma Prieta earthquake and the lessons learned thru yoga and breathing have made me a believer. Perception is 99% of the battle. A sense of control really helps.

I also thought it was interesting that his research has shown worse neuronal damage for stroke patients given corticosteroids in the hospital...that the short term result of less inflammation gives way to long term degeneration from increased glucocortisol in the hippocampus, and "steroid dementia". He recommends using mannitol instead of steroids.

Anyway, an interesting video. Thanks for all of your wise insights and encouragement, Sharon. It is truly appreciated. I'm thankful for this "social outlet" for my stressors :)

best,
AC
Husband dx RRMS 3/07
dx dual jugular vein stenosis (CCSVI) 4/09
http://ccsviinms.blogspot.com
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Postby Shayk » Wed Feb 13, 2008 7:55 pm

Hi AC

So glad you enjoyed the lecture. I didn't take notes and should've.

Mmmmm is right when it comes to his finding the chronic high stress response of females in a male dominated society. Fits right in with my personal biases. Would be interesting to know the incidence/prevalence of MS in female dominated societies. I still think one "environmental" reason for the recent increasing incidence of MS in women and not men might be stress.

Besides the impact he notes in stroke patients, steroids given to people with PPMS also seemed to worsen their condition and I think I read once long ago that they no longer recommend using steroids for traumatic brain injury either because of worse outcomes. Some researchers have questioned their use in MS as well but I don't know if anyone is actually studying that at this point.

You're so right--perception is indeed a big part of the battle and I too am thankful for this outlet for my stressors--MS being one of them. :)

Take care--

Sharon
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