Research on Exercise

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Research on Exercise

Postby Sharon » Tue Nov 09, 2004 1:24 pm

This maybe of interest to some in the community.

I am currently a participant in a research program involving Maximum Effort Exercise (MEE). The program has the support of the Veterans Administration and the U.SA. Dept of Defense. The principal investigator is Michael L. Kuchera, DO. FA at the Philadelphia College of Osteopatic Medicine. The study can be viewed at
:http://www.aventurasenmontezuma.com/downloads.html

The exercise program uses a machine called the ISOPUMP. Purpose is to gain strength without fatigue.

I have completed ten weeks of exercise and I am happy to report that I have gained strength in my whole body. The great thing about this type of exercise is that it takes only 15 minutes, twice weekly. My strength will be tested in one month - theory is that a person will sustain the strength gained without additional exercise for a period of at least 13 weeks. I look forward to seeing the test results for the program - it has to be positive. The chance at a better quality of life without another pill or injection - sounds good to me!

Sharon
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Postby OddDuck » Tue Nov 09, 2004 1:40 pm

Hi, Sharon.

I went to the website, but I didn't see a picture of it. What is it exactly? What does it do? I'm trying to visualize it, but can't.

Deb
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Postby Sharon » Tue Nov 09, 2004 2:11 pm

Hi Deb -

The following website has a video which you can view. It shows the machine in use. One of the unusual parts of the exercise is that you hold your breath for four seconds while you exerting the muscle energy. Most exercise programs teach you to breathe in-and-out while performing a set. My muscles were tired, but they never hurt during or after a session. I found myself breathing deeper also. Hardest part of the ten weeks was taking a PSAT test three times!
http://isopumpinternational.com/articles.html

I will be glad to answer any other questions.
Sharon
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Postby OddDuck » Tue Nov 09, 2004 2:26 pm

Oh, cool!!!

Geez, that's wild....you mentioned holding your breath when you exercise with this program? You know what I find myself doing a LOT when I exercise on my stationary bike? I find myself holding my breath! Then I think "uh oh, I think I'm supposed to breathe". :D Maybe I'm doing the right thing, then!

Ok.....I'll check it out! Thanks, Sharon. Sounds interesting.

Deb
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Postby Sharon » Tue Nov 09, 2004 4:50 pm

Deb - Caution on holding your breath. In a set of exercise we were using all of our strength for a period of four seconds, and then resting for thirty seconds. This type of exercise is different than riding a bike. There was a reason for us holding our breath (sorry, I do not know) - maybe someone who is familiar in the field of neuromuscular would be able to give an answer.

Sharon
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Postby OddDuck » Tue Nov 09, 2004 5:31 pm

Thanks!

Don't worry, though.....I don't hold it that long anyway. Probably couldn't end up holding it for all that long in any event. I start huffing and puffing after about 5 minutes into it anyway. :wink:

I was just trying to find more reasons and incentive to keep exercising. hehehe........

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Postby Sharon » Wed Dec 08, 2004 10:38 pm

An update on my experiences with the exercise program:

To summarize the basis for the research http://www.aventurasenmontezuma.com/

The topic of this research is the effect of progressive non-aerobic high-intensity maximal effort exercise (MEE) and on deconditioned persons such as those with multiple sclerosis (MS). People with a diagnosis of MS commonly become debilitated, deconditioned, and weak. Additionally, MS patients have problems tolerating aerobic exercise, fatigue easily, and recover slowly from fatigue. The broad long-term objective of this line of research is to determine the efficacy of MEE for treating weakness and deconditioning in people with MS and similar debilitating conditions. In persons with a diagnosis of MS, the proposed multi-center randomized study with a wait-list cross-over design will determine if MEE can cause measurable improvement in strength compared to values measured in the wait-list period. The study will also collect data to estimate the effect of these interventions on three core measures of function in persons with MS, the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite measure (MSFC). These measures consist of a 25-foot timed walk, the nine-hole peg test , and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). The study will also track health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures using the Functional Assessment of Multiple Sclerosis (FAMS) and fatigability using the Subjective Perception of Fatigue test



Exercise was completed on the IsoPump Machine - video can be seen at
[/url]http://isopumpinternational.com/

After 10 weeks of exercise (twice weekly 10-15 minutes each session) I am happy to report that my strength did increase. Measurement for the leg press more than doubled (about a 250% increase in strength) and measurement in the lunge doubled. My walking gait is a straight line, longer stride and I have more endurance. I have had less headaches, less sinus problems, and the most exciting news is that my golf game has improved. My left leg has improved dramatically.

Yesterday I went for the follow-up visit. Part of the study was that we could not add any exercise to our normal routine - we could continue anything we were doing prior to the study. So, for a month I have done my regular morning routine of stretches. Results of my follow-up exercise session - I have retained all the strength I gained in the study. This is amazing to me! I will be tested again in one month. Supposedly, I should retain the strength for 9 months without any further conditioning.

Sorry for the length of this post. I would encourage anyone who wants further information to look at the two referenced websites. Results of the current study will not be available for awhile. Of course I will be glad to answer any questions.

Sharon
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