Which Supplements for Neuroprotection & MS?

If it's on your mind and it has to do with multiple sclerosis in any way, post it here.

Which Supplements for Neuroprotection & MS?

Postby SammyJo » Thu Nov 18, 2004 10:24 am

Odduck wrote:
Raising BDNF is only one of many ways to help provide neuroprotection. Maintaining neuronal (via ion channels) sodium density is also a form of neuroprotection. (Keppra - i.e. levetiracetam - helps to provide neuroprotection, also.) Most of the AEDs have neuroprotection mechanisms of action. There are several neurotrophins that will help provide neuroprotection.

And can/should it be inexpensive? Absolutely! It's fairly easy to find substances/drugs that will assist with neuroprotection.

Neuroprotection is a major part of helping MS.
--------------------------------------------------------
I am wondering what we can take for Neuroprotection that is non prescription. How do we raise sodium density, eat more salt?

Any opinion on Anti-Inflammatories May Help Neuron Replacement?
http://www.thisisms.com/modules.php?nam ... =0&thold=0

Has anyone found a comprehensive reference on supplements for MS? There is one, with user ratings at RemedyFind
http://remedyfind.com/type.asp?id=62&TYPE_ID=2

but I'd be interested in seeing others, as it doesn't have all, like ferulic acid or inosine.

SammyJo
User avatar
SammyJo
Family Elder
 
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 4:00 pm

Advertisement

Postby adjanimals » Thu Nov 18, 2004 10:41 am

Check out www.eniva.com
I've been using there VIBE product along with some others since October and with the combination with LDN I have felt much better than I did 6 months ago. Small steps, as in various items are starting to get somewhat better. PM me and I can give you some contact info. Listen to a 15 minute phone presentation. 1-888-363-9480 it's a toll free number.
User avatar
adjanimals
Family Member
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Minnesota, USA

Postby raven » Thu Nov 18, 2004 11:27 am

Ibuprofen seems like a good bet

Some, but not all, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (indomethacin and ibuprofen in particular) also have activating effects on PPARgamma. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest on the one hand a role for PPARgamma-activating drugs in the treatment of chronic neuroinflammatory diseases-as shown for a patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis by Pershadsingh et al.


We have developed quantitative in vitro assays for measuring neurotoxicity of microglia or other mononuclear phagocytes. Neuronal like SH-SY5Y cells are cultured in supernatants from activated cells of the human monocytic THP-1 line and their survival is followed. Respiratory burst is directly measured on the activated cells. We tested inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase (COX) or the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathways as possible neuroprotective agents. The COX pathway generates inflammatory prostaglandins, while the 5-LOX pathway generates inflammatory leukotrienes. We found that inhibitors of both these pathways suppressed neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent fashion. They included the COX-1 inhibitor indomethacin; the COX-2 inhibitor NS-398; the mixed COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor ibuprofen; the nitric oxide (NO) derivatives of indomethacin, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen; the 5-LOX inhibitor REV 5901; and the 5-LOX activating protein (FLAP) inhibitor MK-886. The FLAP inhibitor also reduced respiratory burst activity in a more potent manner than indomethacin. Combinations of COX and 5-LOX inhibitors were more effective than single inhibitors. The data suggest that both COX inhibitors and 5-LOX inhibitors may be neuroprotective in vivo by suppressing toxic actions of microglia/macrophages, and that combinations of the two might have greater therapeutic potential than single inhibitors of either class


I really have this thing with the microglia :wink:

Robin
User avatar
raven
Family Elder
 
Posts: 240
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Bristol, England

Postby OddDuck » Thu Nov 18, 2004 12:37 pm

Robin,

That's like my "thing" with norepinephrine! HAH!

SammyJo, the "sodium density" that I referred to isn't directly related to "salt". It's regarding ions and the ion channels between neurons - electrical impulses, etc. Difficult to explain, but salt "intake" isn't what I'm referring to. It's like "calcium influx". It's not directly related to your dietary intake of calcium at all. It is confusing, though, that they use the same words in biology and physiology, isn't it?

Green tea, antioxidants, Vitamin E, gingko biloba, grapeseed, etc. etc. (as far supplements go) all provide various types of neuroprotection. You can do an internet search and find many types of things (even eating fruit) that helps with neuroprotection. I have to say that "vibe" product that adjanimals referred to just now (I just went and took a peek) goes along with the items I just mentioned! (How coincidental was that?)

Deb
User avatar
OddDuck
Contributing Author
 
Posts: 1040
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby JFH » Fri Nov 19, 2004 4:58 am

Best bet diet folk offer this list:

http://www.direct-ms.org/supplements.html

I quite like this site but I cant do sat-fat free, diary free, gluten free and legume free all at the same time!
John
I am what I am
User avatar
JFH
Family Elder
 
Posts: 288
Joined: Sun Jul 11, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: England

Postby dignan » Fri Nov 19, 2004 2:38 pm

This new book, co-authored by Ray Kurzweil, might have some interesting things to say about neuroprotection...I haven't read it yet mind you...

http://fantastic-voyage.net/
User avatar
dignan
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1608
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2004 3:00 pm

Postby Sharon » Fri Nov 19, 2004 4:37 pm

Supplements / COX-2 inhibitor

In a prior post from Robin she quotes information about COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors. Zyflamend (patent pending) is a natural supplement which is advertised as a COX-2 inhibitor to relieve the inflammation of arthritis. It was recommended to me for the relieve of sinus pain and headache (this was before I knew of my MS dx) My husband and I have been taking for about five years. He was diagnosed with a form of Lupus about twenty years ago. Has the Zyflamend helped with the MS or the Lupus? - I do not know - I do know that neither one of us has arthritis (and we are 61 years of age), my sinus problems have not gone away, but they are not as troublesome. You can get more information by searching on the word "Zyflamend" - pick your site as there are a few.

Another note about Zyflamend - there are articles which reference its use for prostrate cancer (Columbia University has completed research) and also to replace the arthritis drugs such as Voix.

Sharon

edit: I just realized there is another "Sharon" who posts - I do not want to confuse anyone, so henceforth I will sign off as SharonR.
User avatar
Sharon
Family Elder
 
Posts: 1236
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2004 4:00 pm
Location: Colorado

Postby raven » Sat Nov 20, 2004 3:56 am

Just a quick reply...

The she is a he! :wink:

Don't worry Sharon, no offence taken. Robin is a unisex name, although it appears in the UK to be predominantly used for males whereas in the US it appears to be mostly females.

Robin
User avatar
raven
Family Elder
 
Posts: 240
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Bristol, England

Postby OddDuck » Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:03 am

Oh...good! NOW I know for sure, Robin! (Well, I can put away the coin I've been flipping all this time as to whether you were male or female.)

How have I done keeping my responses to you non-gender specific? :lol:

Deb
User avatar
OddDuck
Contributing Author
 
Posts: 1040
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby raven » Sat Nov 20, 2004 7:26 am

You did very well Deb.. :lol:
User avatar
raven
Family Elder
 
Posts: 240
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2004 3:00 pm
Location: Bristol, England


Return to General Discussion

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Youarethecure


Contact us | Terms of Service