eyes

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eyes

Postby robbie » Sat Feb 07, 2009 9:35 am

has anyone gone to a person/doctor that can tell your problems and deficiencies from looking into your eyes?
Had ms for over 19 years now.
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Postby robbie » Sat Feb 07, 2009 1:32 pm

Just another fraud probably
Had ms for over 19 years now.
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Postby mrhodes40 » Sat Feb 07, 2009 2:17 pm

No, I did hear there was a kind of "iris reading" thing that did not work for a friend of mine.......but I have never seen practitioners who tried to sell me on the idea that such a thing would work.

I believe that it is possible for an opthamoligist to see fibrin cuffs on the vessels by looking into your eyes onto the retina, but you already know you have MS, I think :wink:

I have noticed that there are lots of wierd practitioners out there who claim MS is helped by their approach.

One time a gal told me she had a "scio" computer that she could connect to you with electrodes and it could "read" your entire "biorhythems" and it could say all that was wrong with you....
You'd enter your birthdate and birthplace, and the computer would then know your specific biorhythems out of all the humans on earth ..... then it would take the readings and say what you needed to do to get well....
cue "twilight zone" music
it's a scam see that here
http://thesecondsight.blogspot.com/2007 ... chmio.html

Recently our evening news mentioned that company had been involved in some legal action for fraud. Ya think????

No money changed hands! :lol:
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Postby robbie » Sat Feb 07, 2009 2:34 pm

but you already know you have MS, I think
LOL
thanks
Had ms for over 19 years now.
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Postby Lyon » Sat Feb 07, 2009 3:58 pm

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Last edited by Lyon on Sat Nov 26, 2011 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby BioDocFL » Sat Feb 07, 2009 4:04 pm

Eye doctors are trained to look at the back of your eye for early signs of high blood pressure damage. They can also look for signs of diabetes, that can lead to blindness. The color of your eyes, changing from white to yellow can signify jaundice, or infection, I believe. The opthamologists and optometrists are important so let's not ignore that. Even the speed at which dillation occurs when flickering a light in front of the eyes can be telling. I don't know much about the eye or opthamalogy but I do think reputable optometrists and opthamalogists are very important.

A lot of people are afraid to go to doctors for a physical but will go to an eye doctor for glasses, so that may be their only real opportunity at detection of something significant occurring in their health.
Of course there may be charlatans out there. You should check out the credentials and references. If you are talking about fortune-telling or 'palm-reading' of the eye, okay that's weird stuff.
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Postby mrhodes40 » Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:16 pm

I agree genuine doctors like opthomologists and optometrists can diagnose a lot of issues by looking at the retina.

I perhaps misunderstood, but thought Robbie might be thinking of the thing that my friend had no results from, iridology, like this

http://iridologynow.com/page4.html 8O
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Postby jimmylegs » Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:17 pm

a couple years ago i didn't give iridology too much credit and i've never had my irises 'read'... BUT my irises have totally changed since i started eating a wider variety of foods and taking supplements so i think there is something to it. i used to have all these weird yellow flecks and basically grey eyes, they are a much more even blue-grey now.
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Postby Wonderfulworld » Sun Feb 08, 2009 7:18 am

9 years ago I did go to a "healer" who did Iris reading and general wafting his hands around me! He told me that MS was to do with "past life issues" and I thought that was a handy get-out clause for having to deal with it in the here and now. I got a very strong smell of the old BS off the whole thing.
He ran an iris scan based on the imprint of my fingerstips on a computerized pad - it made up the iris picture, don't know how. Anyway a whole chunk of "energy" was missing from the section he claimed to be to do with ears - and I'm totally deaf in one ear. So it was slightly accurate there. But I'm 99.9999999% sceptical about him. Never went back.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Concussus Resurgo
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RR-MS dx 1998 and Coeliac dx 2003
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Copaxone, Cymbalta. EPO, Fish Oils, Vitamin D3 2000 IU daily, Cal/Mag/Zinc, Multivitamin/mineral, Co-Enzyme Q10, Probiotics, Milk Thistle.
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Postby EyeDoc » Mon Feb 09, 2009 12:33 pm

Iridology is crap. Trust me :)
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Postby jimmylegs » Mon Feb 09, 2009 2:06 pm

iridology aside, are there conditions that can alter iris pigmentation?
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Postby EyeDoc » Wed Feb 11, 2009 8:41 am

jimmylegs wrote:iridology aside, are there conditions that can alter iris pigmentation?


Yes. There are certain conditions that can alter the appearance of the iris. They are rare. So rare, in fact, that I rarely encounter any. Most have to do with conditions that alter pigment throughout the body, like albinism.

That is a good question you pose. I need to look up some info and see if there are some that I have forgotten....it's always good to have a refresher on stale knowledge :)
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Postby jimmylegs » Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:56 pm

yea i never figured i was a statistical norm or anything. i mean how many studies out there are tracking possible iris changes in vegans over 15 yr periods :S hehehe

what does the following mean... if something can affect retinal pigment epithelium, might it also affect the iris? what are some iris structural terms i could be using to search for how malnutrition might or might not affect them?

Zinc, a trace element that influences cell metabolism through a variety of mechanisms, appears to play an integral role in maintaining normal ocular function. This element is present in high concentrations in ocular tissue, particularly in retina and choroid. Zinc deficiency has been shown in a number of species to result in a variety of gross, ultrastructural and electrophysiologic ocular manifestations. The physiological functions for zinc have been studied predominantly in retina and retinal pigment epithelium where zinc is believed to interact with taurine and vitamin A, modify photoreceptor plasma membranes, regulate the light-rhodopsin reaction, modulate synaptic transmission and serve as an antioxidant. Suboptimal zinc status in North America may influence the development and progression of several chronic eye diseases. Zinc supplementation trials and epidemiological studies have produced conflicting results concerning the role of zinc in age-related macular degeneration. Additional well-controlled supplementation trials are indicated to clarify the role of zinc in this disease. Future investigations must also expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which zinc regulates ocular morphology and function.
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Postby EyeDoc » Fri Feb 13, 2009 11:05 am

jimmylegs wrote:yea i never figured i was a statistical norm or anything. i mean how many studies out there are tracking possible iris changes in vegans over 15 yr periods :S hehehe

what does the following mean... if something can affect retinal pigment epithelium, might it also affect the iris? what are some iris structural terms i could be using to search for how malnutrition might or might not affect them?

Zinc, a trace element that influences cell metabolism through a variety of mechanisms, appears to play an integral role in maintaining normal ocular function. This element is present in high concentrations in ocular tissue, particularly in retina and choroid. Zinc deficiency has been shown in a number of species to result in a variety of gross, ultrastructural and electrophysiologic ocular manifestations. The physiological functions for zinc have been studied predominantly in retina and retinal pigment epithelium where zinc is believed to interact with taurine and vitamin A, modify photoreceptor plasma membranes, regulate the light-rhodopsin reaction, modulate synaptic transmission and serve as an antioxidant. Suboptimal zinc status in North America may influence the development and progression of several chronic eye diseases. Zinc supplementation trials and epidemiological studies have produced conflicting results concerning the role of zinc in age-related macular degeneration. Additional well-controlled supplementation trials are indicated to clarify the role of zinc in this disease. Future investigations must also expand our understanding of the mechanisms by which zinc regulates ocular morphology and function.


I guess the answer is yes, if something affects the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) it can also affect the iris, but it is more complex than that. Back to albinism...an albino lacks pigment throughout their body. So they do not have enough pigment in their RPE and therefore their vision is abnormal. Consequently, they also lack pigment in the iris. The RPE is one of the 10 layers of the retina and contains pigment, but is not just pigment.

In the article you quoted they are talking about Zinc's role in retinal metabolism. The argument is that an insufficient amount of zinc can harm the eye. We recommend supplements containing Zinc for patients with macular degeneration, but it is not just zinc, but other imporant compounds as well. Anyhow, a lack of zinc, to my knowledge, will not adversely affect the iris. It is in the metabolism of the retina where the problems are which is unrelated to the iris.

As far as metabolism and the iris I would think to look at the effect of malnutrtion on the iris dilator and iris constrictor muscles.
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Postby cheerleader » Fri Feb 13, 2009 2:56 pm

Wilson's disease is caused by excess copper in tissue and nervous system, and causes brown/copper colored rings around the iris...right Eyedoc? Are there other metals that can change eye color? Here's one for ya...how about excess iron?
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