Does anyone here use a inversion table ?

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Does anyone here use a inversion table ?

Postby skydog » Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:22 pm

I have been using a inversion table for about 3 yrs. Started using it before I officially had ms. I have lived with back pain for 33 yrs. Skiing jumping at 18 yrs left me with disc problems. I now use it daily. At first it made my head feel funny, but no problems lately. Used to hear and feel the separation taking place up and down my spine. Now I have actually increased some lost height and have a noticeably straighter spine. Love to here if anyone on this site uses one. May also be some other benefits as well that could help some of us. Sunny Day... Back for more sun !! Mark
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Inversion table

Postby lyndacarol » Fri Mar 06, 2009 7:11 pm

How timely that you have posted about the inversion table! It was mentioned in a recent magazine article and I wondered if I would find it helpful. The cost was listed at $350, which seemed rather high.

I don't recall that the article gave the information of where to find one -- I have not looked around. I am still only considering it. Where did you get yours three years ago?

Perhaps it would be best to see one in person and try it out. I guess I am still thinking about it.
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Postby skydog » Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:54 am

lyndacarol I don't know if I ever got back to you on this. Paid around $350.00 for mine new. Ordered it from teeter hang ups through amazon. They do show up used on e-bay or craigs list at times. Worth every penny. Helps straighten out the kinks after too much google time at the computer.http://www.teeterhangups.com/ Check it out... Feel free to ask any questions... Hang in there Mark
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Postby mrhodes40 » Sat Mar 21, 2009 9:18 am

My Costco had one recently, you might try that?
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Postby lyndacarol » Fri Feb 12, 2010 6:40 pm

I saw the Dr. Oz program today. One of the Alternative Health Secrets that he said he was going to try this year was an inversion table! He even had his "assistant of the day" demonstrate how it is used:

http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/two-alternative-medicine-secrets

I believe he said it costs about $100. I am still intrigued by this device and think I must look into it more.
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Inversion Tables

Postby tashenoir » Sat Feb 13, 2010 7:43 pm

I have one and LOVE it! I don't hang everyday, because if you have dizzy MS feeling it will make it worse. If my back feels stiff or getting sore, I hang upside down for only 10 minutes and the next day my back feels fine.

I hang partway sometimes, not totally inverted. It still helps when gravity pulls on you the other way. I highly recommend them! :D
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Postby newfie-girl » Sun Feb 14, 2010 3:31 pm

Hi guys, wow it was only yesterday I was thinking about the inversion table, I've been kicking around the idea of trying one for years. My delema is now thou, I have just started IBT (inclined bed therapy) and wouldn't this be the opposite of inversion? I guess this is one for Andrew to answer. Bye the way IBT is anothe great therapy too, the most noticeable thing so far is my left foot is toasty warm at night. It use to be like a junk of ice and it's only been 7 nights and costs nothing!!!!! [/b]
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Trendelenburg Harmful

Postby AndrewKFletcher » Mon Feb 15, 2010 5:31 am

Inclined Therapy applies the same tension to the spinal column without the need for an inversion table.

Head down tilt as mentioned does make one dizzy, it also prevents the filtration of blood in the kidneys, as my wife and I found in an experiment, measuring urine density. The urine produced head down, was around the same density of water, indicating that the toxins that should have come out of the blood, remained in the body.

Over time this would be disastrous for our health.

There are a huge amount of published papers on the detrimental affects to the body from inversion, though most relate to short term head down rest and long term head down rest. Search terms Head down tilt hdt, Trendelenburg

Myth: The Trendelenburg position
improves circulation in cases of shock
Sonia Johnson, BA; Sean O. Henderson, MD
, http://www.caep.ca/CMS/temp/pg48%281%29.pdf

Trendelenburg position versus
passive leg raising
Reich and coworkers compared the Trendelenburg position
to passive leg raising in 18 hypotensive patients with coronary
artery disease. Trendelenburg positioning was associated
with higher mean arterial pressure (82 mm Hg v. 77
mm Hg; p < 0.05) and cardiac output (4.53 L/min v. 4.24
L/min; p < 0.05); however, the adverse effects outweighed
the benefits because both interventions stressed the right
ventricle and led to deterioration of pulmonary function.8
Terai and colleagues performed a similar study comparing
the autotransfusion effect of the Trendelenburg position
and passive leg raising in 8 healthy adult males. In this
study both positions increased left ventricular filling,
stroke volume and cardiac output, but the effects were
transient and returned to baseline within 10 minutes. These
authors suggested that both positions might be beneficial;
however, given the small sample size and the use of
healthy volunteers rather than hypovolemic patients, these
conclusions are questionable.9
Conclusion
The Trendelenburg position is taught in schools and on the
wards as an initial treatment for hypotension. Its use has
been linked to adverse effects on pulmonary function and
intracranial pressure. Recognizing that the quality of the
research is poor, that failure to prove benefit does not
prove absence of benefit, and that the definitive study examining
the role of the Trendelenburg position has yet to
be done, evidence to date does not support the use of this
time-honoured technique in cases of clinical shock, and
limited data suggest it may be harmful. Despite this, the
ritual use of the Trendelenburg position by prehospital and
hospital staff is difficult to reverse, qualifying this as one
of the many literature resistant myths in medicine.
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Postby AndrewKFletcher » Mon Feb 15, 2010 5:34 am

newfie-girl wrote:Hi guys, wow it was only yesterday I was thinking about the inversion table, I've been kicking around the idea of trying one for years. My delema is now thou, I have just started IBT (inclined bed therapy) and wouldn't this be the opposite of inversion? I guess this is one for Andrew to answer. Bye the way IBT is anothe great therapy too, the most noticeable thing so far is my left foot is toasty warm at night. It use to be like a junk of ice and it's only been 7 nights and costs nothing!!!!! [/b]


Newfie-girl

Stay with Inclined Therapy, Inversion does not tick all the boxes for people who are healthy, let alon people who have ms. Please add your voice on the inclined Bed Therapy thread when you notice any changes.

Regards

Andrew
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