More EBV research

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More EBV research

Postby bromley » Mon May 04, 2009 11:48 pm

Epstein-Barr virus linked to Multiple Sclerosis


Infection with Epstein-Barr virus appears to raise the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), Boston researchers report.

The findings offer the strongest evidence to date implicating the virus as a trigger for the chronic progressive autoimmune disorder of the brain and spinal cord that affects more than 350,000 Americans, says Lily Jung, MD, medical director of the neurology clinic at the Swedish Neurology Institute in Seattle. Jung was not involved in the study.

Almost everyone is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by the time they reach adulthood. Infection early in childhood typically does not cause severe illness, although infection that occurs in adolescence often leads to mononucleosis.

Researchers have searched for decades for a viral or bacterial agent that may trigger MS in people who are genetically susceptible. Epidemiology professor Alberto Ascherio, MD, DrPH, and colleagues at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston have published several studies suggesting that the Epstein-Barr virus may be that agent.

The new study shows "that people who are not infected with Epstein-Barr virus do not get MS," Ascherio tells WebMD. "All 100% of people who got MS in our study were infected with Epstein-Barr virus," he says.

The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology.

MS Risk and Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies
For the study, the researchers were granted access to more than 7 million blood specimens stored in the Department of Defense Serum Repository. The U.S. military maintains service members' medical records in electronic databases.

The researchers identified 305 service members who were diagnosed with MS plus had up to three blood samples taken prior to diagnosis. Researchers compared these blood specimens with samples from 610 people who did not develop MS but were similar in age, race, sex, and other characteristics to those who did.

The initial blood sample tested negative for EBV-fighting antibodies in 10 (3.2%) of people who developed MS and 32 (5.3%) of people who didn't. Measuring antibodies, which are proteins produced by the body to fight specific infections, is one way to determine the intensity of infection.

Importantly, all 10 of the people who developed MS went on to test positive for Epstein-Barr virus antibodies before the onset of neurological symptoms, Ascherio says. They tested EBV-positive an average of four years before symptoms of the disorder first appeared.

In contrast, only 30% of the people who didn't develop MS later tested positive for Epstein-Barr virus.

Further analysis showed about a 50-fold increased risk of MS among people with the highest levels of EBV antibodies, compared with those with the lowest levels.

Ascherio says that Epstein-Barr virus most likely works in concert with environmental factors to trigger MS in people who are genetically vulnerable to the disease. "We think one of those factors may be vitamin D deficiency," he says.

Source: WebMD © 2009 WebMD, LLC (05/05/09)
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Postby ssmme » Tue May 05, 2009 6:05 am

Bromley,

Where did you find this article? If there's a link please list if for me.

Thanks,
Marcia
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Postby chrishasms » Tue May 05, 2009 7:10 am

It makes sense. I was an adolescent Mono guy and never felt quite right ever since until the treatment.

So here is a question: Will a study liked this lead to doctors to RX Copaxone for a year after the Mono just to make sure the immune system stays tolerant of Myelin. Will it work if its done that early?
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Postby peekaboo » Tue May 05, 2009 7:37 am

what about all the connections w/ CPn? If ms is viral activated...it must be more than one type. Do you thing? :?:
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Postby ssmme » Tue May 05, 2009 8:09 am

Bromley,

Where did you find this article? If there's a link please list if for me.


Never mind, I found it.

Thanks,
Marcia
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Postby Wonderfulworld » Tue May 05, 2009 2:18 pm

Very interesting. I got Epstein Barr 6 years before diagnosis, got MS symptoms about 3 years after EB. I'd say I have been vitamin D deficient most of my life because I was an undiagnosed coeliac.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Concussus Resurgo
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
RR-MS dx 1998 and Coeliac dx 2003
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Copaxone, Cymbalta. EPO, Fish Oils, Vitamin D3 2000 IU daily, Cal/Mag/Zinc, Multivitamin/mineral, Co-Enzyme Q10, Probiotics, Milk Thistle.
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Postby rainer » Wed May 06, 2009 9:55 pm

Digging around on EBV research I found "dioxolane nucleosides" listed as a pre-clinical (ugh) compound.

From a 2000 study :x

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articl ... rtid=90192

In summary, it has been suggested that anti-EBV therapy could be useful in the clinic for the prevention or therapy of EBV-associated diseases, including posttransplant lymphoma and hairy leukoplakia lesions of AIDS patients (10, 11, 17, 41). Since L-I-OddU is the most effective anti-EBV l-nucleoside studied to date, its potential should be examined. While its metabolism and mechanisms of action are still under investigation, L-I-OddU, based on its low toxicity and potent antiviral effect, warrants further investigation as a specific anti-EBV chemotherapeutic agent.

Be nice to know what the **** it has been doing the last 9 years...
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Postby mommasan » Thu May 07, 2009 10:42 am

Well, large viral loads and bacterial loads and toxins can cause immunological changes that break down the BBB. So, this could be the endovascular catalyst.
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