SIGNIFICANCE(?) OF THE FAROE ISLANDS

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SIGNIFICANCE(?) OF THE FAROE ISLANDS

Postby Lyon » Mon Aug 17, 2009 1:06 pm

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Postby turtle_fi » Mon Aug 17, 2009 2:19 pm

very interesting studies. if i understood correctly, they are saying that ms comes originally from infection, and has spread e.g. with the vikings to US. and the british bought it to faroe islands.
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Postby Lyon » Mon Aug 17, 2009 3:57 pm

Well, Dr Kurtzke is saying that his lifetime of assembling and disseminating information convinces him that the increased incidence of MS is the result of the introduction of an unidentified infection.

I'll have to look again but I don't remember him mentioning a Viking gene, that's usually attributed to Poser, but even at worst the idea of a Viking gene isn't a long stretch of the imagination considering that drastically increased MS incidence in the "developed" populations started among those of fair haired, fair skinned ancestry, usually farther N and S of the equator.

Sorry Turtle, that's the long way of saying that what you assume is basically correct......or at least not far from the truth :lol:
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Mon Aug 17, 2009 6:11 pm

The first and last are not available for free. You have some sort of access that is really cool. You are getting me ever so close to putting up very large infection theory post. Would it be plagiarism to take one of those articles and incorporate it into my post? :wink:

Very tempted. Ken
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Postby Lyon » Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:30 pm

notasperfectasyou wrote:You are getting me ever so close to putting up very large infection theory post. Would it be plagiarism to take one of those articles and incorporate it into my post? :wink:

Very tempted. Ken
I don't think someone can get nailed for plagiarism if they only give the author(s) due credit and I don't picture you taking credit for something you didn't write.
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Tue Aug 18, 2009 7:00 am

Oh, no, just giving you credit for finding the article. If I link it, it's going to be the second one. I strongly prefer articles that everyone can read for free.I wonder if Kurtzke is still around? These articles peg him a a local for me. Ken
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Postby Lyon » Tue Aug 18, 2009 10:26 am

Gosh Ken, I only leave these copyright infringement articles on the net for a short while so I wouldn't link to them, but if you save the article to your hard drive you sure can quote to it....while giving the author(s) credit.

Do you mean is John still alive?? Alive and kicking at.....82 or 83 I think. We worked on a powerpoint presentation last year for a neuro presentation in Mexico City he was giving and I was having a hell of a time coming up with his 1955? article on Isoniazid regarding it's possible effaciacy w/MS and the accompanying peer review from the Veteran Administration study group?

I'd like to get him here at MSU to do a talk as a matter of fact. Yeah, he's still busier than I am at 54!

*So there is no mistake, I worked on the presentation and John was the brains of the operation :lol:
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Tue Aug 18, 2009 11:39 am

I thought you were going to write up a short review? I have to admit it's a little slow reading Kurtzke. Ken
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Postby Lyon » Tue Aug 18, 2009 12:53 pm

notasperfectasyou wrote:I thought you were going to write up a short review? I have to admit it's a little slow reading Kurtzke.
After opening my big mouth I was hoping I could weasel out of that one.

Right after I mentioned it, I started running through mind what I would write and that the Faroese data is open to a huge spectrum of interpretation. We all know that I'm already convinced that Kurtzke's "unidentified infection" is actually the loss of of the Faroese "evolutionary normal infections" which the British occupation eliminated rather than introduced, and I'm just not sure how open mindedly I could explain it all.....
Bob
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Tue Aug 18, 2009 1:19 pm

Bobbie,
How many times have I told you not to make promises you can't keep?

I can see the complexity in going at it. I mean, it's a complicated idea to explain, way harder than bacteria having a party in your head.

I do think that sometime .... You're going to need to explain yourself, sonny.

But, I suppose that will come with time.

Ok, so, "Antibiotics for MS - Research Q&A" is coming........
Ken
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Postby Lyon » Tue Aug 18, 2009 1:38 pm

Now reading what someone else has written is something I'm capable of.

Let's get with the program big boy!
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Postby notasperfectasyou » Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:50 pm

Lyon wrote:Let's get with the program big boy!


Done. You like it?

Ok, on this thread, I've just about got this Faroe Island thing figured out. It's a multi-step process:

The abreviation for Mississippi is MS
Brett Farve is from MS
Brett Farve is a Viking

It's all very clear now. Ken
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Postby Lyon » Thu Aug 20, 2009 1:06 pm

notasperfectasyou wrote:The abreviation for Mississippi is MS
Brett Farve is from MS
Brett Farve is a Viking

It's all very clear now. Ken
Clear as mud! It's obvious that you have a Brett Farve fetish, or it's at least obvious that you should say "Brett Farve fetish" three times very fast.


napay wrote:Done. You like it?
I was going to mention five minutes after you posted it that I hadn't read the links but you had done a great job. Sadly, I still haven't taken the time to read the links and I can still only say that you've done a great job of putting all the info together.

Bob
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Postby sojourner » Sat Aug 22, 2009 10:26 am

Another take on the Faroes' MS Epidemic. I guess it's all in one's perspective. Researcher Markus Fritzsche offers his opinion here:


The arrows on Fig. 6 represent the migratory
routes of seabirds, if a number of species such as
puffins and seagulls are taken together. To avoid
very cold and hot weather, seagulls usually move
parallel to latitude or they simply disperse over
comparatively short distances along rivers.
Although epidemics of MS have been attributed to
changes in ascertainment or better diagnosis, par-
ticularly of more benign cases in the post-war
era, another common setting for MS is proximity
to islands or coastal areas where seabirds nest. At
a site near three major seabird colonies in south-
eastern Alaska, for example, MS was unknown until
its first outbreak occurred in 1965. Tunisia, which is
reached by European migratory birds introducing
Ixodes ticks and B. burgdorferi, scores the highest
rate of MS in Africa. And on the Faroes, where
Ixodes ticks have reportedly transmitted Lyme bor-
reliosis from seabirds to human bird catchers, MS
unfolded after an annulled ban on fowling seabirds
during a food shortage in World War II. Mainly
responsible for the transhemispheric exchange of
B. burgdorferi are puffins or shearwaters. Between
September and December, these birds spend their
time along the American coast from Rio de Janeiro
in the north to the Rio de la Plata in the south. By
March and April, the puffins leave their breeding
colonies on the Falklands and other islands in the
South Atlantic heading northwest across the equa-
tor to the rich fishing waters off Newfoundland.
By the end of July, they gradually move back across
the North Atlantic, where they are often seen
around Scotland, Ireland and the Faroes during
the traditional puffin-hunting season. In the south-
ern oceans, where the winds blow almost continu-
ously eastwards in the roaring forties and furious
fifties, a ringed great puffin has even been found
in Australia. Short-tailed puffins are limited to this
part of the southern hemisphere, where the birds
breed on islands off the coast of New Zealand and
Australia, and in Tasmania, as on the Faroes, their
so-called mutton-bird chicks are fowled regularly.
Although of hitherto unexplained low prevalence,
Lyme borreliosis as well as MS can be found in
South East Asia, namely in Japan and Taiwan down
to the Philippines, where the Wallace Line limits
the southward spread of Borrelia harbouring Ixodes
ticks.


From his 2005 paper : Chronic Lyme borreliosis at the root of multiple
sclerosis – is a cure with antibiotics attainable?
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Postby Talisker » Wed Aug 26, 2009 12:12 am

The idea of infection being a cause of ms in the Faroe Islands is an old one. The infection being sexually transmited contiversially being put forward in 2002.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2264447.stm
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