thoughts please

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thoughts please

Postby scorpion » Sat Oct 03, 2009 1:48 pm

I am freaking out here guys. My youngest daughter, only 8 years old, is having problems swallowing her food. I took her to the doctor who ordered a swallow study. The radiologist who observed the study stated he saw no problems with the strength of her swallowing. In other words everything looked fine. She has no neurological symptoms but I am still freaking out guys. The pediatrician listened to my concerns and reminded me my daughter chances of getting MS are higher then the general population but were still very very low(1%-3%), especially considering her age. This should have made me relax but I have been absolutely stressed out all week. What do you guys think? I feel so fortunate to be able to "talk" to you guys about this because I am not sure others understand my fear. What a great forum(yes even you CCSVI people,lol)!!!
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Postby LR1234 » Sat Oct 03, 2009 4:14 pm

I would wait and see if something happens again. she may have been conscious of her swallowing or something for some reason. Is she happy and acting normally?

I wouldn't draw her attention to it too much as you could make her more anxious and focus on it more. I am not suggesting that it is not organic in nature but sometimes children do have issues that come and go.

When you say she can't swallow is she actually choking on her food? or did she have an experience that is making her think she might choke on her food?
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Postby scorpion » Sat Oct 03, 2009 4:48 pm

She is acting completely normal.Her energy level has not changed a bit. No she is not choking on food but is struggling with hard stuff. Liquids are no problem for her. I am trying not to show her I am over concerned about it but it is hard.
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Postby Sharon » Sat Oct 03, 2009 8:40 pm

scorpion

I am sure you have searched the Internet for answers for your daughter. Just in case though, here is a site with some information on childhood swallowing problems
http://www.asha.org/public/speech/swall ... ildren.htm

She's your baby - it is hard for a parent to see their child sick or hurting. Take care and know we are thinking of you.

Sharon
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Postby Lyon » Sat Oct 03, 2009 9:26 pm

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Last edited by Lyon on Sat Nov 26, 2011 9:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby jimmylegs » Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:55 am

sounds scary, s.
i have to say, i had my swallowing looked at by one of those specialists and he didn't find anything wrong, but i'm not an idiot and there was definitely something so wrong, i was afraid i could die.
in my case, magnesium was very helpful.
i don't know why an 8-yr-old would be that low on magnesium, there could be other reasons for her dysphagia (maybe iron, maybe b vits), and it could be transient and never come back.
but, the mag fix is my dysphagia experience, for what it's worth.
btw, have you had your daughter's d3 tested? it's known that low d3 status is associated with greater risk of ms development (as ww has been reporting recently).
hope everything is back to normal for your family asap!
jl
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Postby Loobie » Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:26 am

I'll be dead honest. If it was my daughter I'd get her in the MRI tube. As we know from Avonex to Campath to even CCSVI. Catching it early is the key. If you get an MRI and there's nothing in it, maybe you can relax and take a wait and see attitude about the swallowing, but I'd be like you, I'd be freakin' out and would get it done for my own peace of mind.
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Postby patientx » Sun Oct 04, 2009 7:28 am

Scorpion:

Could you describe your daughter's problem a little more? Is it something she is complaining about, or something that you can observe?

The reason I ask, is it possible she has something like a bad sore throat, and it hurts to swallow, rather than a problem with actually getting food down?
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Postby scorpion » Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:25 am

I had her to the doctor twice and they checked her throat and even took a throat culture to check for strep. On Friday I took her for a barium swallow study and the radiologist said he could not see any problems. I am waiting to hear back from her pediatrician to see what to do next. The weird thing is she is fine in every other way. She is playing soccer, running and playing with her friends outside, etc. The radiologist did tell me, because I asked, that it would be strange if she has something neurological going on relating to her swallowing for problems not to show up on the barium study. That is where we are!
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Postby patientx » Sun Oct 04, 2009 9:47 am

Well, it sounds like all bases are being covered. I hope they find out what is causing her problem.
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Postby Lyon » Sun Oct 04, 2009 10:18 am

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Postby jimmylegs » Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:38 pm

children and infants rely on their parents or clinical physicians to be alert to the signs and symptoms of their swallowing
problems...

swallowing issues can fail to show up on a barium study! they don't necessarily feed you things of the same consistency as what is giving you trouble. in my case, the liquid was too thick. i was having problems with liquid the consistency of my own spit, not a smoothie :S that was not the entire reason they didn't see much, but it was part. do you think they gave her hard enough stuff to set off her symptoms?

i googled dysphagia deficiency in general, and besides magnesium it came up with B vitamins and iron. iron is such a common deficiency, and there's a link to that pesky helicobacter pylori in the mix when you get into GI stuff and iron deficiency

there's some good reading out there by the looks of it, could help you get a handle on the possibilities?

In 573 normal infants and children, we found the concentration of serum ferritin to parallel known changes in iron stores during development. The median serum ferritin concentration was 101 ng/ml at birth, rose to 356 ng/ml at 1 mo of age, and then fell rapidly to a median value near 30 ng/ml (95% confidence limits: 7-142 ng/ml) between 6 mo and 15 yr of age. In the adult, median concentrations diverged according to sex, 39 ng/ml in the female and 140 ng/ml in the male. In 13 children with iron-deficiency anemia, the serum ferritin concentration was 9 ng/ml or less.


The prevalence rates of [iron deficiency anemia] IDA, H pylori infection, and H pylori-associated IDA in female [adolescent] athletes were higher than in the control group. The relative risk of IDA was 2.9 (95% CI, 1.5 to 5.6) for those with H pylori infection. Athletes who exhibited H pylori-associated IDA showed significant increases in hemoglobin, iron, and ferritin levels after H pylori eradication. The subjects in the control group who were treated orally with iron alone showed no significant changes.


The differential diagnosis of dysphagia in children is widespread. Dysphagia is defined here as any process that produces difficulty with active transport of food and liquid from mouth to stomach. This article divides diagnostic pediatric dysphagia into categories including congenital, infectious/inflammatory, systemic, neoplastic, traumatic, and miscellaneous causes (Table 1).

Feeding and swallowing disorders during childhood are on the increase and typically occur in conjunction with multiple and complex medical, health, and developmental conditions. A multidisciplinary approach is essential for the evaluation of these disorders and the prompt initiation of appropriate treatment. Following a brief description of the terms feeding and swallowing, this article provides an overview of the available epidemiologic data on dysphagia and its common diagnostic conditions, impact, evaluation, and management in the pediatric population.

Difficulty swallowing or dysphagia can be present in children and adults alike. Pediatric dysphagias have long been recognized in the literature. Certain groups of infants with specific developmental and/or medical conditions have been identified as being at high risk for developing dysphagia. Still others may present with a swallowing or feeding problem as their primary symptom. Left untreated, these problems in infants and children can lead to failure to thrive, aspiration pneumonias, gastroesophageal reflux, and/or the inability to establish and maintain proper nutrition and hydration. Awareness of the prevalence of pediatric dysphagia in today's population and the signs and symptoms of this condition aids in its treatment. Early detection of dysphagia in infants and children is important to prevent or minimize complications. This article provides a review of symptoms, etiologies, and resources available regarding management of this condition to help the primary care physician and the families of young children and infants in its management... children and infants rely on their parents or clinical physicians to be alert to the signs and symptoms of their swallowing
problems...
Objective swallowing assessments used may include
a videofluoroscopic swallow study (often called a cookie swallow), which is performed with radiology and determines how well the infant or child can tolerate amounts and types of liquids and soft foods... barium esophogram can be used to assess esophageal motility and rule
out gastroesophageal reflux
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Postby scorpion » Sun Oct 04, 2009 2:51 pm

Thanks jimmylegs. I will look through the literature you posted. I think that Lyon is hinting I need to step back and get out of my "MS zone" and relax. I do not know about other parents on this board but I am constantly watching for "signs" of MS in my kids. I really do appreciate everyone's input.
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Re: thoughts please

Postby NHE » Sun Oct 04, 2009 3:21 pm

Can the problem be as simple as she's just not chewing her food enough? I know that some young children get used to having their parents cutting up their food into small bite sized pieces but then have a problem transitioning over to doing it for themselves. I have seen this be a problem with my own niece and nephew.

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Postby Lyon » Sun Oct 04, 2009 3:38 pm

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