Experimental cancer drugs

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Experimental cancer drugs

Postby scorpion » Fri Jan 15, 2010 6:38 pm

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Postby sou » Sat Jan 16, 2010 6:47 am

Hi.

That would be great, but I am afraid that it is not something concerning us, since it will not overlap with our lifespan.

sou(r)
Shortest joke: "We may not be able to cure MS but we can manage its symptoms."
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Postby scorpion » Sat Jan 16, 2010 7:26 am

I hear you Sou. It seems like so much that we post on this site is hope for the next generation which is not a bad thing but it is frustrating. Hopefully we will at least be around long enough to see some of the treatments that are early in the pipeline kick some serious MS butt before we go!
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Postby Algis » Sat Jan 16, 2010 7:45 am

I would not bet on that....

We are living exciting times :) What we know today will looks like basics in 20 years....


I want to see it; I want to know the end of the story :D

Cheers!!
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Postby dignan » Sat Jan 16, 2010 10:39 am

Well, in the spirit of this thread, I thought I'd post a couple of other articles that are a long way from maybe one day helping people with MS.


Researchers led by Royce Mohan, associate professor of ophthalmology and visual science in the UK College of Medicine, found that the small molecule withaferin A can simultaneously target two key proteins — vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) — implicated in a damaging biological process called reactive gliosis.
http://www.physorg.com/news182779972.html


In the February 1st issue of G&D, Dr. Brian Popko (The University of Chicago) and colleagues describe how mutation of a gene called ZFP191 leads to disordered CNS myelination in mice -- reminiscent of what is seen in human multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.
http://www.physorg.com/news182716860.html
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