Hello

New members should feel free to introduce themselves here

Hello

Postby QuicheLorraine » Thu Dec 27, 2012 5:31 am

I thought I should introduce myself. I am a 46 year old female Army veteran. I have recently been diagnosed with secondary progressive MS. I was undiagnosed during the relapsing/remitting stage. Years ago, the Army diagnosed me with migraines (that I now know were actually MS headaches.) I kept quiet about many of my other symptoms because I did not want anyone (including my husband) to think I was some sort of hypochondriac. About a year ago, while I was getting dressed one morning, I started getting vertigo, I fell on the floor and I was unable to move my legs or talk. I was able to move my arms and dialed 911 on my cell phone. I had the doctors at the ER puzzled. This started the ball rolling, and I was referred back to the VA for testing. They sent me to the neurologist, who informed me that MS had shown up in a CT scan form 3 years ago. No one bothered telling me! Now, after a spinal tap and a zillion other tests, I finally have a firm diagnosis.

I am hoping to learn a lot from this board, and make some new friends as well. :-D
User avatar
QuicheLorraine
Getting to Know You...
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2012 1:56 pm

Re: Hello

Postby lyndacarol » Thu Dec 27, 2012 1:51 pm

Although we have exchanged ideas already in the Veterans forum, this is my "official" welcome to ThisIsMS, Lorraine. Many of us here have our own unique ideas on MS – mine revolve around excess insulin.

I have no medical background; but as I look at the description of your experience, I wonder if an endocrinologist, rather than a neurologist, would have been more appropriate. I realize that MS is diagnosed with imaging that shows lesions on the brain or spine; but with my belief of excess insulin involvement in MS, I think MS will eventually be moved to the area of endocrinology. In my own case, I had symptoms for years but my first three MRIs showed NO lesions.

Excess insulin leads to insulin resistance in muscle cells and could be the reason for your inability to move your legs a year ago, especially if you have insulin resistance in skeletal muscles and muscle weakness has persisted. My standard recommendation for everyone with an MS diagnosis is to request a "fasting blood insulin test." The optimal test results should be 3 UU/ML or lower. MY first test came back with 12 UU/ML; later tests have never been below 9. Six of my friends with MS have had this test and have found elevated results also.

We are glad you found us, QuicheLorraine.
Last edited by lyndacarol on Thu Dec 27, 2012 7:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
My hypothesis: excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia) plays a major role in MS, as developed in my initial post: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-discussion-f1/topic1878.html "Insulin – Could This Be the Key?"
User avatar
lyndacarol
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2253
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:00 pm

Re: Hello

Postby QuicheLorraine » Thu Dec 27, 2012 2:07 pm

My insulin levels have always been quite low. I have a direct history of diabetes in my family (my mother, her dad, his mom), and I had gestational diabetes with all of my four kids. I have a fasting blood insulin test coming up in February. I will keep an eye on it. ;)
User avatar
QuicheLorraine
Getting to Know You...
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2012 1:56 pm

Re: Hello

Postby want2bike » Thu Dec 27, 2012 6:28 pm

Since you have been in the military you were probably exposed to vaccines. Doctor Bergman seems to think there is a relationship between vaccines and autoimmune disease. His belief is healing is done through diet, sleep, exercise and meditation. Hoping you find the path to good health.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGmyUppmt-g
want2bike
Family Elder
 
Posts: 738
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2011 9:15 am

Re: Hello

Postby lyndacarol » Thu Dec 27, 2012 6:45 pm

QuicheLorraine – Diabetes is diagnosed by a high blood sugar (a.k.a. glucose) level. The fasting blood insulin test that I recommend is not used to diagnose diabetes, has only been available since about 1960, is not routinely done (is usually a special request), and is done with a blood draw in the lab (not with a finger prick and glucose meter). It must be tested soon after the blood is drawn because the insulin quickly degrades. If the blood cannot be quickly tested, it should be frozen to preserve the insulin sample until it can be tested.

If your family members had type II diabetes, their insulin levels were elevated. When you had gestational diabetes, your insulin level was elevated (a woman's body produces excess insulin to support the fetus while she is pregnant). Excess insulin promotes insulin resistance (insulin becomes ineffective) and the blood sugar level rises (i.e., diabetes is diagnosed!).

The glucose test and the insulin test are often confused. They are TWO different tests. If you are having the insulin test in February, I hope you will share the results with me. All the best to you.
My hypothesis: excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia) plays a major role in MS, as developed in my initial post: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-discussion-f1/topic1878.html "Insulin – Could This Be the Key?"
User avatar
lyndacarol
Family Elder
 
Posts: 2253
Joined: Thu Dec 22, 2005 4:00 pm

Re: Hello

Postby QuicheLorraine » Thu Dec 27, 2012 8:14 pm

All three were type 1. Mother and Grandfather were both insulin dependent from a faily young age. Great grandmother went blind around the age of 20, so hers was juvenile onset as well. My insulin test was ordered by my GP in conjunction with my yearly physical. They do this every few years. And, yes, I will share my results. ;-)
User avatar
QuicheLorraine
Getting to Know You...
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2012 1:56 pm


Return to Introductions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


Contact us | Terms of Service