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New here

Postby AworldGONEmad » Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:10 am

Was diagnosed in spring of 2011 after a very severe attack that left me in a wheelchair. [EDSS of 7.0 to 7.5] Have tried copaxone. MRI showed more activity so switched to rebif. Was not tolerating this well at so discontinued use. Now, just searching for answers like everyone else. Well, hello. :-D
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Re: New here

Postby lyndacarol » Sun Sep 01, 2013 9:19 am

Welcome to our ThisIsMS community, AworldGONEmad.

We are all searching for the answers. You will find lots of information posted here. Please join our discussions and add the information you find.
My hypothesis: excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia) plays a major role in MS, as developed in my initial post: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-discussion-f1/topic1878.html "Insulin – Could This Be the Key?"
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Re: New here

Postby Munnsy » Tue Sep 10, 2013 12:24 pm

Hello to everyone, everywhere!
I am new to the site but, unfortunately, not so new to this condition we share. I consider myself to have been lucky though, I have had MS for twenty one years diagnosed and despite the fatigue (there's no fighting that, is there?) I am still doing really well. I have been married for 15 years and have a beautiful daughter of 12.
I did have a very frightening period before diagnosis when I developed an awkward limp and was falling all over the place. I had severe numbness in my hands, chest and feet. I struggled to hold a pen, cut food, etc. Despite this, my recovery from my one and only relapse was pretty much full and I am so thankful for that. I have always remained positive and smile through each day but it is a hard struggle and so difficult as I think we MSers portray ourselves better to others outwardly but the inward struggle remains a tough and personal one.
Yesterday I became emotional about having to admit to the Driving Licence Agency that I even have MS at all. I live in the UK and have recently moved house thus prompting the need to mention my illness. It is a legal requirement to change address on a licence so I applied for a pack to do so. However, on the form there is a question which asks you to tick if you have any of the following illnesses. Of course, MS is on there! Trouble is that there is a statement about falsifying information on there which could lead to a hefty £1000 fine, even 2 years in prison. I now feel that if I do tick the box it means that I also have to fill in a questionnaire which means I have to admit to my date of diagnosis but that was in 1993!! I have never informed them as I feared the hefty premiums on my insurance (all other insurances I have purchased been heavily weighted due to MS). I suppose what I'm wondering is - has anyone else experienced similar and, do you think I'm worrying too much. I guess that my options are to admit the MS and take the flack for not having told them for all these years or continue hiding the full truth. If I was in any way a risk to anyone on the road due to my health I would not drive but I am lucky to be this well and suppose I resent being penalised for no reason. I apologise for the heavy introductory letter, does anyone have any advice to share?

Keep smiling
:)
Munnsy
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Re: New here

Postby lyndacarol » Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:06 pm

Munnsy wrote:Hello to everyone, everywhere!
I am new to the site but, unfortunately, not so new to this condition we share. I consider myself to have been lucky though, I have had MS for twenty one years diagnosed and despite the fatigue (there's no fighting that, is there?) I am still doing really well. I have been married for 15 years and have a beautiful daughter of 12.
I did have a very frightening period before diagnosis when I developed an awkward limp and was falling all over the place. I had severe numbness in my hands, chest and feet. I struggled to hold a pen, cut food, etc. Despite this, my recovery from my one and only relapse was pretty much full and I am so thankful for that. I have always remained positive and smile through each day but it is a hard struggle and so difficult as I think we MSers portray ourselves better to others outwardly but the inward struggle remains a tough and personal one.
Yesterday I became emotional about having to admit to the Driving Licence Agency that I even have MS at all. I live in the UK and have recently moved house thus prompting the need to mention my illness. It is a legal requirement to change address on a licence so I applied for a pack to do so. However, on the form there is a question which asks you to tick if you have any of the following illnesses. Of course, MS is on there! Trouble is that there is a statement about falsifying information on there which could lead to a hefty £1000 fine, even 2 years in prison. I now feel that if I do tick the box it means that I also have to fill in a questionnaire which means I have to admit to my date of diagnosis but that was in 1993!! I have never informed them as I feared the hefty premiums on my insurance (all other insurances I have purchased been heavily weighted due to MS). I suppose what I'm wondering is - has anyone else experienced similar and, do you think I'm worrying too much. I guess that my options are to admit the MS and take the flack for not having told them for all these years or continue hiding the full truth. If I was in any way a risk to anyone on the road due to my health I would not drive but I am lucky to be this well and suppose I resent being penalised for no reason. I apologise for the heavy introductory letter, does anyone have any advice to share?

Keep smiling
:)
Munnsy


Welcome to ThisIsMS, Munnsy.

Since you have assessed yourself as being no risk to anyone on the road, my opinion is that you are justified in reading the question very carefully and parsing the words. If the questionnaire asks, "Do you have MS?" and you do not have active symptoms that would cause an MS diagnosis today, I think you could honestly answer, "No." MS is misdiagnosed at times; this could have been your situation so many years ago.
My hypothesis: excess insulin (hyperinsulinemia) plays a major role in MS, as developed in my initial post: http://www.thisisms.com/forum/general-discussion-f1/topic1878.html "Insulin – Could This Be the Key?"
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Re: New here

Postby Munnsy » Wed Sep 11, 2013 11:27 am

Thank you so much for your speedy response, lyndacarol.
Munnsy. :)
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